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Assistant or Associate Professor for Applied Economics

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first_imgThe Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and AgriscienceEducation is seeking candidates for a 9-month, tenure trackposition of Assistant or Associate Professor in Applied Economics,with a promising record of applied economic research inagricultural, food, resource, or environmental economics. Thefaculty member will be responsible for developing and deliveringcourse content in agribusiness and/or applied economics withprimary emphasis in data science and analytics (Big Data),statistical/econometric and computational methods, demonstratedPython, Stata, R, and/or SAS programming experience as well asdeveloping a quality academic research program with a promisingrefereed publication record. Prospective candidates are alsoexpected to assist with the leadership of the Department’sAnalytical Survey Laboratory, to provide knowledge of qualitativeand quantitative methods with applications of Big Data analytics,and to provide analytic expertise to expand the Department’sresearch portfolio. Excellence in teaching and curriculumdevelopment is required with strong consideration offirst-generation and diverse student populations. Continuousservice involvement with the profession, Department, College,University, and Community are also expected.last_img read more

St. Hugh’s drops Aung San Suu Kyi’s name from common room

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first_imgAung San Suu Kyi, the State Counsellor and de facto leader of Myanmar, studied PPE at St. Hugh’s, graduating in 1967. She has received international condemnation for the Myanmar government’s treatment of its Rohingya minority.The decision to rename the room follows the college’s earlier removal of an Aung San Suu Kyi portrait to in September. Last week, Oxford City Council concluded that it was “no longer appropriate” for Aung San Suu Kyi to hold Freedom of the City of Oxford.The Myanmar leader has also been criticised by fellow Nobel Peace Prize laureates including current Oxford University student, Malala Yousafzai.This condemnation extends from the view that Aung San Suu Kyi has been perceived as inactive in actively dealing with the severe humanitarian crisis in Myanmar’s Rakhine state.The UN described the atrocities being inflicted upon the Rohingya as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”. In a previously released official statement, the college stated that it “shares the grave international concern about the persistent ethnic violence towards, and treatment of, the Rohingya community,” and they “earnestly hope that Aung San Suu Kyi will do everything within her power to stop the violence and address the underlying issues as a matter of urgency”.The JCR Committee will now work to have the College add a letter of condemnation to this statement. Speaking about the consequences of the ballot passing, the JCR Secretary Curtis Crowley said: “JCR Committee will be going back to the JCR to seek further arguments and evidence for both sides before petitioning the principal and other college officials”.He stressed the need for a “strong and well-evidenced case” to be put to college authorities, who have already responded to the crisis in Myanmar. St. Hugh’s JCR has voted to remove the name of its Junior Common Room, currently named after the controversial leader of Myanmar Aung San Suu Kyi.In a meeting last week, the JCR resolved to remove the name of their common room. According to the motion, it would be a statement of “solidarity with the persecuted and oppressed minority of Myanmar”. The motion aimed to show students of the college “condemn crimes against humanity and Aung San Suu Kyi’s stance on this issue”.The motion also mandated the JCR Committee to petition the Principal and other college officials to write an open letter of condemnation to Aung San Suu Kyi on behalf of the college.The vote was in the form of an anonymous online ballot. The motion passed with 115 votes in favour of the motion, 45 votes against, and 11 abstentions.Affnafee Rahman, the second year student who proposed the motion, told Cherwell: “The fact that Aung San Suu Kyi studied in this college… makes the Rohingya crisis far more relevant to the students of Hugh’s.” According to Rahman, the passing of the motion means “that we, as concerned global citizens and promoters of peace have done some justice to our moral responsibility in standing up for the oppressed and those who don’t have a voice, and that for me is the most important thing”.The motion was delayed following Sunday night’s JCR meeting. Several students felt that the highly important nature of the resolutions should be settled in an anonymous online ballot.Elise Page, who seconded the JCR motion, said: “the symbolism of our condemnation has more weight,” given Aung San Suu Kyi studied at the college.Recognising the meeting’s debate on the issue, they said: “Several members of the common room have pointed out that this is a complex issue – it is. What is not complicated is deciding whether human rights offences are wrong.“We cannot sit by idle while the suffering continues. We must work with what we have namely, the prestige of an Oxford college, and one associated with Aung San Suu Kyi at that – to help those in need as much as we can.”last_img read more

A professor’s journey to belief

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first_imgHarvard Kennedy School Professor Khalil Gibran Muhammad bears a famous name and is the progeny of an equally famous religious leader. He was born into the counterculture of the 1960s, to parents inspired by the mysticism of Lebanese-American poet Khalil Gibran, and spent his early childhood on the South Side of Chicago within the community of the Nation of Islam, the religious and political group led by his great-grandfather, Elijah Muhammad.On Wednesday night, beneath the bright lights of the main hall of the Smith Campus Center, Professor Muhammad reflected on these, and other, defining forces of his life, in the first installment of a new series of conversations hosted by Muslim Chaplain Khalil Abdur-Rashid. Titled “Life Matters,” the series presents an opportunity for Harvard students to learn from the experiences of esteemed members of the University community, through dialogue addressing the role that religion, spirituality, and ethics have played during their lives.Throughout the evening, Muhammad shared insights from a life that in many ways he has “grown into,” beginning with his reflections on how it has always been a work in progress to understand the significance of sharing Gibran’s name. In seventh grade, an English teacher gave him a signed copy of the poet’s most renowned work, “The Prophet,” a gift that Muhammad says marked “the first time in my life I realized how important my namesake was, and I began to read and study and I realized that I could make something of this, in terms of his legacy, and my own.”Bearing the name wasn’t always easy. As a child, he said, he often had to explain it to his public school classmates (the majority of Nation of Islam students attended religious schools, but he did not); his seventh-grade yearbook described him as Kahlua Muhammad. Later in life, he said he was denied financial aid for a Ph.D. program when a member of the search committee admitted concern that he was affiliated with the Nation.The Nation forged a large part of Muhammad’s cultural identity, but it was not the only influence. His mother, “a product of the ’60s” who never joined the Nation herself, raised him with the humanist values by which she lived her life — concepts that became more prominent in his upbringing when his parents divorced. By the time Muhammad was “7, 8, 9, the world I had known as a small child completely transformed and changed … I was an orphan within a context of a religion that was most prominent in my life.”For much of the rest of his youth, Muhammad was neither Muslim nor Christian, in any traditional sense, even as he was powerfully influenced by the culture of the Nation. In 1984, when he was 12, he met a lasting mentor, “a Jewish dude from Edison, N.J.,” who hired him to fix computers for University of Chicago professors. He was the first Jewish person Muhammad had known well. Time spent with this mentor, whose own perspective was largely secular, helped expand Muhammad’s worldview beyond the South Side. As he grew, religion provided a rich source of knowledge and understanding, but in general involved more culture than belief.“My parents never positioned their own faith journey, no matter how active or engaged it was personally, as some litmus test for how to judge the character of other people,” said Muhammad. “It was less about what they said and more about how they treated people.”,“My parents never positioned their own faith journey, no matter how active or engaged it was personally, as some litmus test for how to judge the character of other people. It was less about what they said and more about how they treated people.” — Khalil Gibran Muhammad, pictured above, left At age 18, Muhammad became more intimately associated with a specific system of beliefs when he entered his first real relationship, with a woman who was active in the Pentecostal tradition. Since then, Muhammad has identified as a Christian. The beginnings of his journey in this faith were accompanied by his mother’s newfound interest in going to church, and in the proliferation of the megachurches that marked American spiritual life in the early 1990s. His Christianity was solidified when he met and married his wife, Stephanie Lawson, a Southern Baptist who grew up in Florida.“My Christianity and my experience with religion has always turned on its grounding in a distinct black church tradition,” he said, “and that’s been fortified by the fact that my family — I now have three children — has depended upon religious communities for our cultural nourishment.” This was especially the case when Muhammad taught at Indiana University, in Bloomington, which had a very small black population compared to where he grew up.There have been significant challenges in Muhammad’s life, and he shared some of those. When he was very young, the death of his father’s younger brother Omar, and the devastating grief of his family, shook Muhammad in a way that made him mortally afraid of the deaths of himself and his parents. News stories during the Cold War would send him into a tailspin; an exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science that foretold the death of the solar system when the sun is extinguished — in 7 to 8 billion years — caused him to break down on the spot.Today Muhammad is a prominent professor of history and a respected author. His book “The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America” won the 2011 John Hope Franklin Best Book award in American Studies. But early on, it wasn’t evident that he would have a successful career in higher education. In high school and college, he says he regularly slept through class. Later, working as an accountant at a prominent firm, he would frequently hide in the office’s bathroom stalls to take naps. At 22, he was diagnosed with narcolepsy, a condition he has managed without medication for the past two decades. (Asked about his advice for students who may be suffering from a similar condition or disability, he said, “If you are experiencing something that makes you do something that other people don’t do, get help. Don’t wait … It definitely changed my life.”)As the evening drew to a close, Abdur-Rashid asked Muhammad a final, encapsulating question, “Why does life matter?”“For me, the older I get, the harder it is to imagine that my life is not fundamentally about the people in it,” he said, “and that the thing that I can control is how I love those people, how I model the values that I have, in particular because I have three children and a partner who has been my best friend for 20-plus years now. For me, life matters because life is a gift, for ourselves and for those people we experience life with. And if we experience those people with greater love and compassion and care and sensitivity, then it all makes sense.”last_img read more

Peruvian Armed Forces to Deploy Military Engineers to the Central African Republic

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first_imgTo maintain this prolonged effort, Peru will supply its first contingent of service members to MINUSCA for a year, with a second group of Peruvian Soldiers relieving them in November 2016. Currently, there is no end date regarding Peru’s commitment to the mission. “All combatants who participate in a peacekeeping operation must realize that they are going into a conflict zone and understand what they will have to confront,” Col. Chapoñan explained. “We have taken all necessary precautions to secure the perimeter. We won’t be alone in the zones with the most action; there will be battalions and Troop leaders from other countries.” The Peruvian Armed Forces have much to contribute to international peacekeeping operations. “The airfields in the Central African Republic are rather unkempt due to the religious conflict. A lot of work is required – work that will help the United Nations deploy other types of aircraft. The populace will also benefit from the arrival of humanitarian aid or commercial flights, which to date are not occurring at the airfields due to the serious defects.” Peruvian Troops participate in several UN peacekeeping missions By Dialogo September 15, 2015 We are all free slavery has ended “Our country has always been sensitive to the sustained efforts that the UN has deployed in the course of its history to contribute to reaching and fostering the noble objectives of peace and peaceful coexistence, to which all peoples of the world aspire since they are indispensable to their social and economic development,” the Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff website reports. As of July 31, more than 200 Peruvian service members were participating in five of them: the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH); the UN Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO); the African Union/UN Hybrid operation in Darfur (UNAMID); the UN Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS); and in UN Operations in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI). Such efforts have taken Peruvian service members all over the world in recent years, assisting peacekeeping operations in the Western Sahara, the Congo, Cyprus, Lebanon, Iran-Iraq, the Golan Heights, Eritrea-Ethiopia, Burundi, Sudan, Namibia, Côte d’Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Haiti. Composed of 160 Military engineers and 45 service members responsible for their protection and security, the Airfield Construction and Maintenance Company will work on 35 airfields in the Central African Republic. Peru’s Armed Forces received approval to deploy the contingent in July after a meeting with a delegation that included officials with the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the UN Department of Field Support (DFS). “This is not something that can be done in a short amount of time. We estimate the work will last approximately 10 years.” Preparing for the UN mission The Peruvian Armed Forces will deploy 205 service members in November to construct and repair important airfields in the Central African Republic as part of the United Nations (UN) Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission (MINUSCA). Since December 2013, the Central African Republic has been battered by waves of violence, a consequence of conflict between Christians in Antibalaka and Muslims in Séléka. The bloodshed has killed at least 5,000 people, and in 2014 displaced more than 900,000 residents. As of early 2015, more than 500,000 people remained displaced, with half of the country’s population of 4.6 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. “The plan is for this first contingent, commanded by Military Engineering Colonel Antonio Córdoba, to carry out its first mission in the city of Bouar (prefecture of Nana-Mambéré), in the western part of the Central African Republic, beginning next November,” said Colonel Juan Chapoñan Vinces, head of the Office of International Affairs, Peruvian Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in an interview with Diálogo. MINUSCA’s mandate to protect civilians and support stability in the Central African Republic began in September 2014. To buttress the effort, the UN formed the UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in the Central African Republic (BINUCA) and assumed the responsibilities of the African-led International Support Mission in the Central African Republic (MISCA). In total, the UN is deploying 9,110 Armed Forces Troops, 144 Military observers, and 1,552 police officers to the peace mission. They are being supported by 462 civilian personnel, 219 local civilian staff members, and 76 UN volunteers. To prepare for the assignment, the Peruvian contingent of engineers, technicians, captains, and Soldiers trained for five weeks in April and May in Peru’s Joint Peace Operations Training Center (CECOPAZ), in accordance with UN standards. The training focused on patrol techniques, physical fitness, threat response, building entry, humanitarian law, and countering ambushes – all essential skills for Troops who are deploying to a potentially violent and volatile region. Peru is a major contributor to such UN peacekeeping missions. These efforts continue a record of generous contributions by the South American country to overseas peacekeeping operations since 1958. Peru formalized its willingness to serve in such missions by signing a Memorandum of Understanding with the UN in November 2003. Supporting stability Along with these highly trained Soldiers and Military engineers, the Peruvian government will also provide equipment and material to repair the airfields, including front loaders, bulldozers, steamrollers, steam shovels, water tanker trucks, fuel, engines, and combat vehicles. “The Peruvian Armed Forces have experience in real combat, the terrorism problem we have faced for many years has obligated us to,” Col. Chapoñan said. “That experience is leveraged to send out this sort of contingent. They can help the United Nations peace missions. [Furthermore], the peace operations have increased the high level of professionalism in Peru’s defense sector, international cooperation, and mutual confidence.”last_img read more

What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida

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first_img August 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida Associate EditorWhen Florida’s newest justice, Raoul Cantero III, was introduced by the governor at a news conference on the Capitol steps, a reporter asked whether he opposes the death penalty.“I have no views,” Justice Cantero replied.That many judges and judicial candidates — from county court to the state’s highest court — are reluctant to express views on controversial and political issues is playing it safe with the Code of Judicial Conduct designed to protect the impartiality of the judiciary.But there’s a new wave of debate rippling through Florida about whether the lips of judges or judicial candidates must be sealed on such hot issues after all. That debate was recharged June 27, when the United States Supreme Court, in a 5-4 ruling, found that Minnesota’s canon prohibiting judicial candidates from announcing their views on disputed legal and political issues violates the First Amendment ( Republican Party of Minnesota v. White ).What impact will that ruling have on Florida’s judicial elections?That depends on whom you ask.Ask the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee, chaired by Dade County Judge Jeffrey D. Swartz, and the answer is a resounding: no impact in Florida.In an explanation of the ruling mailed to every judicial candidate and challenged incumbent judge in Florida, Swartz highlighted in bold print that White “has no impact on the statutory or code provisions which regulate judicial elections in Florida.”While the distinction is clear-cut in his mind, Swartz said there has been a lot of confusion out there in the real world of judicial campaigning.“We have been inundated as a committee since White with a number of requests for opinions that clearly indicate there are a number of judicial candidates — and incumbent judges, too — that we believe don’t understand the impact, or lack thereof, of White, ” Judge Swartz said. “That’s why we sent a copy of our opinion to everyone up for election. And it says in bold, ‘In Florida, nothing has changed.’ We have a couple who like to argue a different position. We tell them we’re just an advisory board. We’re not an enforcement board.”But others predict looser lips, pumped-up politics, and on the plus side, greater information for voters who often complain they don’t know enough about judicial candidates to cast meaningful ballots.“Though Florida’s Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee issued a statement saying the Minnesota decision means nothing here, hardly anybody else believes that,” wrote St. Petersburg Times columnist Martin Dyckman. “And, of course, the interest groups will be firing up their candidate questionnaires.”The Christian Coalition of Florida, for one, welcomes the opportunity to better size up judicial candidates, saying the top question they receive from their members is: “Where do judges stand on the issues?”American Bar President Robert E. Hirshon warned the ruling “will open a Pandora’s box. We will now have judicial candidates running for office by announcing their positions on particular issues, knowing that voters will evaluate their performance in office on how closely their rulings comport with those positions. It is not the type of justice system the American people want.”At least one Judicial Qualifications Commission case — regarding Escambia County Judge Patricia Kinsey’s challenge to paying a proposed $50,000 fine for alleged improper campaign speech against an incumbent judge — is pending before the Florida Supreme Court (case no. SC96629) and will pause for the filing of briefs to address the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in White. But in explaining the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee’s “no-impact” stance, Judge Swartz stresses the distinction that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision is “very narrow and expressly limited to the ‘announce clause’” — which was removed from Florida’s Code of Judicial Conduct in 1994.Like Minnesota, Florida’s current judicial code does, however, include a “pledges or promises clause,” which separately prohibits judicial candidates from making pledges or promises of conduct in office other than the faithful and impartial performance of the duties of the office — and the U.S. Supreme Court specifically noted that prohibition was not challenged in White, and therefore the court expressed no view.What’s the difference, practically speaking, on the judicial campaign trail? In an interview, Judge Swartz acknowledged the difference is “very subtle.”“A promise or a pledge would be: ‘Every person who commits first-degree murder goes to the electric chair.’“Then you take a look at a judge in a nonpartisan setting who says, ‘I believe the death penalty is appropriate, and in appropriate cases should be applied to serve as a deterrent.’ Those are announcements of positions of political and controversial issues and come short of a pledge or promise,” Judge Swartz explained.Because Florida does not have the announcement clause, Judge Swartz said, judges are able to state positions in general, as long as it is not done in a partisan setting.“Don’t go to a gathering of the Republican Party and say you are against abortion, because you know that will get you votes,” Swartz said. “Don’t say at the Democratic Party event that you are against school vouchers. That would be deemed to seek partisan support.”But it would be okay, Swartz said, for a judicial candidate to address a group of senior citizens at a condo meeting and express opinions about Social Security issues or health care for the elderly.Special interest groups may be able to get judicial candidates to tell them their personal views on abortion, Swartz said, but that candidate “cannot say, ‘I will do everything I can to impede Roe v. Wade. ’”At Florida State University College of Law, visiting Assistant Professor Howard Wasserman, who specializes in First Amendment law, said the White case “certainly will inject more politics into judicial elections.”What Wasserman found most interesting was Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s concurring opinion, in which she took the opportunity to blast the process of electing judges, sometimes rife with million-dollar-plus campaign contributions, in practice in 39 states, including Florida.“If the state has a problem with judicial impartiality, it is largely one the state has brought upon itself by continuing the practice of popularly electing judges,” O’Connor wrote.“An undercurrent of the opinion is that if you take this step and allow judges to be elected by the political process, you are stuck with a robust, wide-open, and uninhibited debate on public issues,” Wasserman said.“If you want to elect judges, fine. But we’ve got this thing called the First Amendment. It will give you headaches, but you are stuck with it. That’s the bottom line. And the gloves are going to come off.”Speaking as an individual judge, not as chair of the committee, Swartz said, “I can tell you that politicalization of the judiciary is something that has been happening. It just started a short time ago, and it is more pronounced.“I think that certain legal issues and political issues have divided us and polarized us to the extent that both sides of issues are demanding answers that border on the pledge or promise they are not allowed to get,” Swartz said.“Some parties, organizations, and groups of people would like to see us do away with a nonpartisan judiciary. These are the kinds of things that are a real attack on the independence of the third branch of government. It’s very disconcerting.”The nation’s highest court was divided on how far judicial candidates should go in expressing their views, with the goal of balancing free speech rights with maintaining an impartial and open-minded judiciary.“The notion that the special context of electioneering justifies an abridgment of the right to speak out on disputed issues sets our First Amendment jurisprudence on its head.. . . We have never allowed the government to prohibit candidates from communicating relevant information to voters during an election,” Justice Antonin Scalia write in the majority opinion.But in her dissent, Justice Ruth Ginsberg made a sharp distinction between candidates for the judiciary and for the other branches of government, because judges must be concerned with the due process rights of litigants.“When a judicial candidate promises to rule a certain way on an issue that may later reach the courts, the potential for due process violations is grave and manifest,” Ginsberg wrote. And she argued the “announce clause” and “pledge or promises clause” are not so conveniently separated.“The constitutionality of the pledges or promises clause is thus amply supported; the provision not only advances due process of law for litigants in Minnesota courts, it also reinforces the authority of the Minnesota judiciary by promoting public confidence in the state’s judges. The announce clause, however, is equally vital to achieving these compelling ends, for without it, the pledges or promises provision would be feeble, an arid form, a matter of no real importance,” Ginsberg wrote.In Florida, the “announce clause” went by the wayside, sparked by a 1990 ruling from U.S. District Judge William Stafford, of the Northern District of Florida, who sided with the American Civil Liberties Union in giving judicial candidates greater latitude in discussing disputed legal or political issues.“A person does not surrender his constitutional right to freedom of speech when he becomes a candidate for judicial office. A state cannot require so much,” Judge Stafford said at the time. “Indeed, when a state decides that its trial judges are to be popularly elected, as Florida has done, it must recognize the candidates’ right to make campaign speeches and the concomitant right of the public to be informed about judicial candidates.”In the current JQC case, Roy Kinsey, Jr., on behalf of his wife, Judge Patricia Kinsey, told the Florida Supreme Court in an order to show cause: “This may be an appropriate time for this court to issue the ‘narrowing construction’ called for by Judge Stafford in his order granting plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment following the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals’ remand of American Civil Liberties Union v. The Florida Bar, 999 F.2d 1486 (11th Cir. 1993), and provide future candidates easily understood guidelines that will permit them to fully discuss issues relevant to the office they seek without fear of violating the Canons.”What political views are okay for judicial candidates to express?Professor Wasserman notes that in White, Minnesota’s code of conduct provided an approved list of topics to inquire of judicial candidates, such as cameras in the courtroom, how minorities and women are treated in the court system, and how a judge might reduce case loads.While not “hot-button” political issues — like the death penalty or abortion rights — Wasserman said, they still contain political ramifications, nonetheless. And the argument can be made that voters have a right to seek and gather information about candidates — judicial or not.“If we have to make judges open to popular elections, then the gloves come off. Do we hope judges behave with slightly better comportment than candidates in the political branch? We hope they do. Does it hurt judicial independence? No more than popular elections, in and of itself,” Wasserman said.Judge Swartz concluded that freedom of speech could end up tying judges’ hands in the courtroom, because expressing their views makes judges vulnerable for removal on certain types of cases that come before them. For example, a judge who has proclaimed he is against abortion, would likely be asked to recuse himself on all cases about abortion rights.“All a candidate can tell you is: ‘I love the law. I believe in the law. Are there things I don’t like about the law? Yes, but as a judge, it’s my job to enforce the law the way it’s written, and that’s what I am going to do,’” Swartz said.“Asking judges to do more is committing them to a course of action they cannot carry out.”Bottom line: No matter what the Supreme Court says about free speech, lawyers will still be able to ask to disqualify a biased judge.last_img read more

‘Fifty Shades of Grey’: Guiltless, Mindless, Glorious Indulgence

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The premiere of the Fifty Shades of Grey film is sparking two kinds of buzz throughout the country—from the I-can’t-wait camps, and from the I’d-rather-eat-glass-than-watch-that-drek crowd. Critics, from the Daily Beastlast_img

Pavilions Hotels launches franchise model to property owners | News

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first_imgNewerEmirates Group slumps to US$3.8bn six-month loss Guests are looking more to branded properties that offer safety and known standards in the post Covid-19 world. Key advantages for owners under the Pavilions Hotels & Resorts franchise model include that they can maintain full operational control of their property.At the same time, the group says, owners gain immediate market presence and global distribution from the brand website and other sales channels, access to development, sales, marketing and operational support. – Advertisement – The Pavilions Hotels & Resorts has launched a franchise model to hotel owners and operators.The group aims to add to its existing portfolio of nine hotels and resorts across Asia and Europe under ownership and management. – Advertisement – OlderSO/ Moscow set for 2023 opening in Russia For the launch of the new franchise model, up until January the company is waiving the initial joining fee for all new properties.Within Asia, use of the franchise model has been limited, compared with the United States, where it is estimated that over 70 per cent of hotels are franchised, rather than under traditional hotel management agreements. For independent hotel operators, it is becoming increasingly competitive and harder to stand out amongst the international brands. – Advertisement – The Pavilions’ first franchise property joined the group earlier this year as the Pavilions El Nido Resort, on Palawan island in the Philippines.The Pavilions Hotels & Resorts began 20 years ago by passionate founder and owners Gordon and Danielle Oldham. “We are seeing a definite change in expectations from owners in Asia.  “There are many great boutique properties across the region, delivering great experiences to guests in their properties. “However they are struggling to attract business to the property without being a known brand and seeing the high costs involved in the marketing of a stand-alone property,” said Scot Toon, the Pavilions Hotels & Resorts managing director, Asia. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Advent in Zagreb was named the best in Europe for the third time in a row

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first_imgZagreb’s Advent has been the best in Europe for the last three years and is breaking all records.Thus, for the third time in a row, it was named the best Advent in Europe by the European Best Destinations Advent portal in Zagreb. Thus, the Croatian capital in a competition of 20 cities defended the title that it will carry for 2018 and also became the only city that holds the title of the best Christmas destination for three years in a row, and the Tourist Board announced that it will no longer run.In the selection for the best Christmas destination in 2018 on the European Best Destinations portal, 200.596 people from 131 countries participated, and 38.830 voters gave their vote among the candidate cities to Zagreb, while the second-placed Colmar received a total of 24.625 votes. It is interesting that 72% of the votes came from Europe, while voters from Australia, America and Russia gave the most votes to Zagreb, while Zagreb is in second place among voters from Austria and England.Of course, there is always the question of the relevance of the choice, but in the end only one thing is important, and that is how Advent breaks all tourist records this year as well. Thus, in the first nine days of Advent 2017 (December 1-10.12.2017, 37.685), 28 arrivals of guests were recorded, which is 9 percent more than in the first 2016 days of Advent 68.480, and 23 overnight stays were realized, with a growth rate of 20.158 percent . Of these, domestic guests realized 22 overnight stays (an increase of 48.322 percent), while foreign guests registered 24 (an increase of XNUMX percent). Apart from guests from Croatia, most overnight stays were realized by tourists from Italy, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Great Britain and the USA.So, whatever others think, Advent in Zagreb is a big hit, and TZGZ took advantage of the opportunity and made good money for the title of the best Christmas destination in Europe. The figures on the growth of arrivals and overnight stays show how relevant it is, and the story of the relevance of the European Best Destinations portal comes to an end. The title of the best Christmas destination is as relevant as the Tourist Board makes it relevant, and the Tourist Board succeeded in that and branded the whole story very well, and in the end it charged.In the final analysis, the figures speak for themselves, as well as justify the hypothesis that investing in a manifestation is an investment, not an investment. By the way, last year, according to a survey, the total consumption generated by Advent in Zagreb was estimated in the range of 390 to 438 million kuna.<br />
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Thailand shooting: Soldier who killed 20 shot dead in shopping mall siege

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first_imgPolice have identified the suspected shooter as 32-year-old soldier Jakrapanth Thomma.The killings began at around 3 p.m. (0800 GMT) on Saturday when the soldier opened fire in a house before moving to an army camp and then to the mall, posting messages on Facebook as he went.Thai media said the suspected shooter had worked at an army base close to Nakhon Ratchasima, which is about 250 km (155 miles) from the capital Bangkok. Before the attack, Jakrapanth had posted on his Facebook account that he was out for vengeance — but he did not say for what.A provincial health official told a news conference that a total of 20 people had been killed and 42 wounded, revising down an earlier figure of 21 dead given by other officials. “We don’t know why he did this. It appears he went mad,” Defence Ministry spokesman Kongcheep Tantrawanit told Reuters.Overnight, soldiers and police stormed into the mall and escorted hundreds of trapped people to safety.”It was frightening because I could hear the occasional gunshot…we waited a long time for the police to come and help us, many hours,” said Suvanarat Jirattanasakul, 27, her voice trembling after she emerged.The mall was busy with shoppers on a long weekend for the Buddhist Makha Bucha holiday.CCTV footage from inside the mall posted on social media showed the gunman dressed in black and wearing a mask, his gun slung over his shoulder with no sign of other people around.Facebook said it had removed the suspect’s account.”There is no place on Facebook for people who commit this kind of atrocity, nor do we allow people to praise or support this attack,” a Facebook representative said in a statement.Major shootings are rare in the Southeast Asian country other than in the far south, where a decades-old insurgency persists.  Thai security forces on Sunday shot and killed a rogue soldier who went on a rampage in a shopping mall in a northeastern city, ending an overnight siege after a series of attacks that left at least 20 people dead.Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul confirmed the soldier had been shot dead at the Terminal 21 mall in the city of Nakhon Ratchasima.”Thank you police and army for ending the situation. Shooter shot dead!!!” Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul said in a post on Facebook. Police and the army also said he had been killed.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Eagles Reaction to the Lesotho’s Goal was Magical, Says Rohr

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first_imgAFCON 2021 QUALIFIERFemi Solaja with agency reportStill smarting from the 4-2 away win on Sunday night in Maseru, Head Coach, Gernot Rohr, has said that he is contented with Super Eagles’ conceding first so far the end result is positive for his team.The Franco-German gaffer was reacting to Eagles come back after conceding an early goal against Lesotho in Nigeria’s AFCON 2021 qualifier against the southern African nation. Super Eagles Coach, Gernot Rohr Just like it happened in the opening match last week in Uyo against Republic of Benin, Super Eagles had to dig deep to overcome the Crocodiles of Lesotho.Right hailed his players for showing that his team is a force in football.He said he saw only the positives whenever his side conceded first.“Some matches, you score the first goal and in some matches you concede first,” he said.“We scored first against Brazil and Ukraine but we didn’t win, so I prefer to concede first and win the match.“This has proven that my players have a good spirit because they never give up.“They continue to play well and do not panic. We have a very young team and what I like is the enthusiasm to play football.”He is also full of praises for the Super Eagles for putting up a brave performance despite arriving Maseru a few hours before the game.“We know that it’s difficult to win in Lesotho especially when you concede the first goal. They played very well in the beginning but we had to take the game in our hands,” Rohr continued.“We had a long travel by night and you can see that at the beginning, my players were not fully concentrated.“In the second half, we changed our organisation a little bit and it was better and better. I feel that my players have fun when they play football and that is most important.“We won but congrats to my colleague, he has a good team they gave us a lot of trouble.”Having won their two games, Nigeria top Group L with six points. They host Sierra Leone in their next match on August 31, 2020.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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