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Briefing

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first_img Previous Article Next Article A round-up of news from the professional journalsFine exemption bid Community nurses in central London will face hefty charges every time theytravel by car unless a union campaign to win them exemption is successful.London mayor Ken Livingstone plans to introduce a daily £5 congestion charge totravel into the centre of the capital by January 2003. But Tom Sandford, theRCN’s regional director for London, was “optimistic” nurses will winexemption. Nursing Times 18 July Death risk scoring A new scoring system for assessing a patient’s risk of death fromcardiovascular disease is available online. The system calculates an adult’srisk of death based on 11 factors, including age, sex, systolic blood pressureand total cholesterol levels, smoking, and diabetes. Nursing Times 13 July Staffing success A national staffing agency run by the NHS is benefiting nurses and managers,a conference on the progress ofNHS professionals has heard. The agency has beenpiloted since November at 15 sites, with a further 30 set to join the scheme.The service offers trusts a single point of contact for finding staff throughcollaboration between NHS employers in local labour markets. Nursing Standard 25 July BriefingOn 1 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

OUSU elections dogged by technical problems

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first_imgHundreds of students are still waiting to be emailed codes which allow them to vote in OUSU’s annual elections this week.OUSU staff sent 19,000 emails to students last night, expecting that all would have received the messages (with personalised codes included) by this morning.However, reports suggest that technical problems have meant that only some emails have been sent out, with hundreds still waiting to be delivered.The polls close at 6pm on Thursday evening.last_img

Former Finland prime minister headed to Harvard

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first_imgEsko Aho, former prime minister of Finland and current executive vice president for corporate relations and responsibility at Nokia, has been appointed a 2012-13 senior fellow at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government (M-RCBG) at the Harvard Kennedy School. As a senior fellow, Aho will pursue research on the changing role of the state in maintaining welfare and global competitiveness.The Senior Fellows Program is designed to strengthen the connection between theory and practice as the center examines and develops policies at the intersection of business and government.Other new M-RCBG senior fellows are Richard Balzer, a leadership and strategy consultant; Justin Fox, editorial director of the Harvard Business Review Group; Christian Gollier, director of the Toulouse School of Economics; and Lisa A. Robinson, a specialist in the economic analysis of environmental, health, and safety regulations.For more information.last_img read more

SOUTHCOM Donation Strengthens Honduran Elite Police Force

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first_imgBy Kay Valle/Diálogo July 10, 2018 In early May, the Honduran government inaugurated a training center for the Government Special Response Security Unit (TIGRES, in Spanish), an elite unit of the Honduran National Police. A $3 million donation from U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) financed the new center, located about 42 kilometers west of Tegucigalpa in Lepaterique, department of Francisco Morazán. The complex, officially opened on May 2nd, is home to about 200 TIGRES elements and serves as a deployment base for tactical operations as well as a training center for future members of the elite police force. The center was built in 18 months. “SOUTHCOM made a significant investment, not only for the National Police, but also for the country, when it created these new, modern facilities,” Deputy Commissioner Javier Díaz Herrera, director of the Honduran National Police Special Forces, told Diálogo. “[They are] equipped to a high standard [and] will be used to host our police officers and provide training.” The modern complex was built in a 4-hectare field and contains five administrative offices, two classrooms, 10 dorms, a gym, a nurse’s station, and a dining room. In addition, the premises have outdoor training areas and three shooting ranges. Rigorous training As of May, the base prepares future TIGRES with rigorous training, including theoretical instruction and physical conditioning. Students start their routine at 4:30 a.m. with physical activities. “In the beginning of the 12-week TIGRES course, only for active members of the National Police, students start with moderate training that progressively gets harder as the course progresses,” Deputy Commissioner Díaz said. “Then, tactic defense classes [start], so as to move forward with the TIGRES commando syllabus.” During the three-month course, police students specialize in human rights and the legal use of force to meet the main goal of the TIGRES force: to fight against organized crime. Future TIGRES are trained in raid operations, urban and rural patrolling, interdiction, mountain survival and rescue, and close combat operations. Additionally, the courses include training for riverine, maritime, and airborne operations and firearm instruction. Future TIGRES also receive first-aid training, something unprecedented in Honduran Police training. “It’s an innovative concept for [Honduran] police to know first aid,” Honduran National Police Commissioner José Alejandro Ramos Escobar told Diálogo. “An injured person might not survive if they are not assisted in due time. We’ve had confrontations with criminals, where police officers or citizens were seriously hurt, and our own [TIGRES] assisted with first aid, saving their lives.” Aside from the new training base in Lepaterique, the TIGRES force has an operational deployment base in El Progreso, Yoro department, dedicated to planning and developing operations in the northern and Atlantic region of the country. The base was financed with the same SOUTHCOM donation and opened in April 2018. The police also has facilities for TIGRES in San Pedro Sula, Cortés department. Elite forces The TIGRES elite force (whose acronym in Spanish spells tiger), counts with some 500 elements nationwide. The unit was created in June 2013 with the support of the U.S. and Colombian governments to fight against organized crime and narcotrafficking. U.S. Army members and elements of the Jungla Commando, a special operations unit of the Colombian National Police, trained the first TIGRES cohort in early 2014. “Every elite unit gets a moniker,” Deputy Commissioner Díaz said. “In police jargon, it [tiger] refers to a remarkable individual who does things well, so it fits this unit like a glove.” Since its creation, the TIGRES commando has been among the leading structures responsible for capturing drug lords and disrupting criminal organizations. TIGRES also takes part in joint operations, such as with the Honduran National Interinstitutional Security Force (FUSINA, in Spanish). “In the operations or raids we carry out at the national level against drug trafficking, organized crime, gangs, or high-impact operations benefitting from military-police training, the participation of TIGRES, which can easily adapt due to its training, is always crucial,” Honduran Army First Lieutenant José Antonio Coello, FUSINA spokesperson, told Diálogo. According to 1st Lt. Coello, FUSINA dismantled 23 criminal gangs in joint operations with TIGRES, so far in 2018. According to the U.S. Department of State’s 2018 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, Honduras is a main transit country for illegal drug trafficking and chemicals used in the production of narcotics. The report, however, indicates the Honduran government’s improvements in the fight against drug trafficking—and stresses on continuous support from the U.S.—thanks to special counter-narcotic units, such as the National Police’s TIGRES force. “SOUTHCOM’s essential support, the training and preparation of this personnel [TIGRES], the headquarters of Lepaterique, and the implementation of filters for admission and purging mechanisms in law enforcement agencies, as well as the support of land, air, and maritime defense, allows for direct combat against organized crime and drug trafficking,” 1st Lt. Coello said. “This is reflected at the international level, because Honduras is no longer one of the most violent countries in the world.”last_img read more

Get ahead of the purchase-money curve by engaging realtors

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first_imgWhat is top of mind for me as we approach the end of the year is the total pivot to the purchase money market for next year. We have seen refinancings continue to fall throughout the year to a smaller percentage of mortgage loans originated, now around only 30%.And there are a lot of signs that the Federal Reserve will raise rates a little bit more between now and next summer. This means purchase loans are the key to growing your market share.As credit unions know, purchase money lending requires more work to “get it done,” and loan officers need to kick it up a notch to compete successfully.THE POWER OF COMMUNITYPerhaps the greatest step a loan officer can take, and a credit union CEO or CLO can encourage, is to get out into the community and connect with everyone who can help bring in those loans.At the top of that list are Realtors.Think about it: Housing is local; credit unions are local; and Realtors are local.  We work within our communities to match people with homes. We know the local market (and for credit unions, our members) and can provide the best loan products as a result.Do you have relationships with your local Realtors? They can’t work with you if they don’t know you.And with the move to a purchase market, there exists a great deal of urgency for taking action now—before the home-buying season really starts heating up in the spring.ENGAGING REALTORS Here’s a quick list of my 2019 Initiatives for Realtor Engagement: Make and maintain a list of every Realtor you have contact with. Use the list in marketing campaigns, social media and other initiatives. Your efforts will get you closer to your Realtor network and can benefit you immensely. Create an Outreach Program for Realtors in your marketplace. Start with job descriptions of your employees and identify the required skill set and the kinds of people, including your existing loan officers, who should be trained to carry out the program, a critical task for finding loans in 2019 and beyond. Create a strategy to add Realtor Broker offices or companies on your SEG hit list. Set a goal for adding as many Realtors as possible to your FOM. (For the most part, FOM issues should not be an impediment.).WHAT WE DO BEST Being successful in the coming year will require that credit unions focus on doing what they do well, which is being close to their members and the community. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bob Dorsa Bob Dorsa is the President of the ACUMA (American Credit Union Mortgage Association) a professional trade association (co-founded by Dorsa in 1996). ACUMA is one of the most unique niche … Web: www.acuma.org Detailslast_img read more

MasterIndex: How do Croatian citizens see festivals and how many do they visit?

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first_imgMastercard, in cooperation with GfK – Center for Market Research, conducted an online survey among cardholders aged 18-55 in Croatia, according to which Croatia has experienced a festival boom in the past few years, which is most often discussed in terms of the number of tourists that festivals attracts.However, so far it was not known how Croatian citizens see festivals and how many they visit. According to the results of the MasterIndex survey, which Mastercard conducted in Croatia in May, half of the respondents (52%) have visited a festival in the last two years, and these are mostly street, music and cultural festivals in the country.Croats most often visit street festivals (42%), pop music festivals (32%), rock and metal music festivals (29%), gastronomic festivals (28%), electronic music festivals (21%) and various other cultural events.Respondents from northern Croatia most often go to festivals (57% of them have been to at least one festival in the last two years) and younger ones, aged 18 to 29 (58% of them have visited at least one festival in the same period). On the other hand, festivals are seldom visited by those between the ages of 40 and 49, and among them as many as 56% of those who have not been to any festival in the past two years. However, it is the group that most visits street festivals – according to research, the most popular among Croats.When it comes to festivals abroad, 7% of respondents have visited them in the last two years. This number is slightly higher among young people between 18 and 29 years of age (10%), Istrians (12%) and those with a monthly income of more than 9.000 kuna (18%).Pop music is loved by women, the most popular electronics in Northern CroatiaPop music festivals are most popular in Dalmatia (41%) and in Lika (41%). Women prefer them (41%) – only 22% of male respondents stated that they have visited one of the pop festivals in the past two years – and they are least visited by respondents from Zagreb (24%). Rock and metal music festivals are mostly attended by men (36% of them have visited such a festival in the past two years) and more often by people from Lika, and the least by residents of Northern Croatia.Photo: Klemen Štular, ForestlandGastronomic festivals are the most attractive to respondents from the age group 30-39 (33%), Zagreb and Lika, and the least among respondents from Dalmatia (19%). Jazz and classical music festivals are most often attended by respondents with incomes above 12.000 kuna (42%) and more often by Istrians and Slavonians. Electronic music festivals are most popular among respondents from Northern Croatia (27% of them have visited such a festival in the past two years) and in Istria, Primorje and Gorski Kotar and are more popular among men, young people and respondents with higher education. Film festivals are most popular among the people of Zagreb and in Lika, Kordun and Banovina.Consumption less than 1.000 kn per festival The majority of respondents who go to festivals (52%) have visited one to three festivals in the past two years, while 59% of respondents with incomes above HRK 12.000 have visited more than 3 festivals in the same period.The main factor influencing the decision to go to the festival and the choice of events are costs (68%). At the top of the list are the selection of performers (50%), atmosphere (40%), weather conditions or the season in which the event takes place (35%) and the duration and date of the event (19%). At festivals, Croats spend the most on drinks (90%), food (75%), transport to the location (54%), souvenirs (33%), accommodation (29%) and cigarettes (24%).As many as 43% of festival visitors said that they do not need accommodation, while those who take it usually choose apartments (26%), then hotels (20%), followed by hostels (13%), camps (11%) and other options. (11%). After the end of the festival, slightly more than a third of the respondents (36%) remain at the location. This share is slightly higher among young people (45%) and those with a monthly income of more than 9.000 kuna (almost 50%). Those who continue their stay, mostly stay at the location for another day or two (74% of them).An interesting fact is that only 17% of respondents spend over 1.000 kuna per festival, not including tickets, and consumption, of course, depends on individual preferences, but also the capabilities of visitors. Consumers from Zagreb and the surrounding area (1.000%), highly educated (20%), men (21%) and those with a monthly income of over HRK 22 (12.000%) have spending to a greater extent than HRK 44 per festival. As the most common method of payment, as many as 93% of respondents state cash, while cards are the primary means of payment for respondents with incomes above HRK 9.000.Photo: Zagreb Light FestivalWe usually visit festivals with a partner or friendsAlmost two thirds of respondents (62%) go to festivals with a partner, slightly less than half (45%) with a small group of friends and approximately one in five (21%) with family. Going to the festival with a partner is more common among those between 40 and 49 years of age (71%), and with friends among young people between 18 and 29 years of age (64%). Respondents with high incomes and those from Istria, Primorje and Gorski Kotar usually travel alone.”Festivals are a pledge to achieve even better tourist results. That is why we have included the Dubrovnik Summer Festival, ULTRA Europe, Pula Film Festival, Šibenik’s Changer and Špancirfest in our Priceless Croatia platform, so that citizens and tourists can experience experiences inaccessible to others at www.priceless.com.”Said Gea Kariž, Marketing Director at Mastercard for Croatia.The global digital platform Priceless Cities offers tourist experiences to Mastercard card users in a total of 42 destinations, thus promoting the tourist offer of numerous world and now Croatian destinations among travelers from 87 countries around the world. Apart from tourists, the experiences are also available to local residents, and the opportunities offered by Priceless Croatia relate to gastronomic, cultural and entertainment facilities that allow users to experience the country in a completely new and unique way.last_img read more

Town centres only choice in Hants

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

PSBB fails to flatten COVID-19 curve in East Java: Task force

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first_imgWhile other regions have claimed that large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) have helped flatten the COVID-19 infection curve, East Java health authorities say the policy has yet to flatten the curve in the provincial capital of Surabaya.East Java COVID-19 task force curative management head Joni Wahyuhadi said the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases had continued to rise in Surabaya and its neighboring regencies of Sidoarjo and Gresik, despite the imposition of PSBB in the regions since April 28.Ten days after the policy was implemented, Surabaya and its satellite areas recorded that the number of confirmed cases had increased by 53.7 percent from 508 to 781. Surabaya has become the disease epicenter in the province with 592 confirmed cases and 78 fatalities as of Thursday. The fatality rate in the area also remains high as it currently stands above 10 percent of total confirmed cases. The Health Ministry recorded 1,267 confirmed cases and 133 deaths in East Java on Thursday.Read also: Jakarta’s curve flattened? Experts question government’s claim“Our evaluation from the epidemiological approach shows that the contact index and transmission rate have remained high,” Joni told journalists on Thursday evening.He added that the task force believed the policy had failed to flatten the curve due to low public obedience to health protocols, such as maintaining physical distance and wearing face masks. Topics :center_img Joni recommended PSBB be enforced in a stricter manner in the following days.Governor Khofifah Indar Parawansa said earlier that her administration would likely extend the PSBB for another 14 days if the policy had not succeeded in curbing COVID-19 transmission.Read also: Police lock up 171 people for violating curfew during PSBB in Greater SurabayaApart from the increasing cases, health authorities have also discovered new clusters of virus transmission in the area, including in a factory owned by tobacco giant PT HM Sampoerna in Surabaya, where two workers died and 60 others were infected by the virus.The East Java COVID-19 task force has been working to track and test more people in the cluster to prevent further spread.The provincial task force is scrambling to establish emergency hospitals in Greater Surabaya as COVID-19 referral centers are overcrowded. According to data from health authorities, there are 403 beds at COVID-19 referral centers in Surabaya to handle 869 patients who need intensive care. In Sidoarjo, only 160 beds are available for 212 COVID-19 patients; while Gresik has 24 beds for 117 patients. (kuk)last_img read more

Robeco Institutional Asset Management appoints chief executive

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first_imgAt the same time, newly appointed supervisory chairman Bert Bruggink – who once served as chief financial and risk officer at Rabobank, Robeco’s former owner – has also resigned.Both Steyn and Bruggink have taken up new positions at Orix.Steyn succeeded Roderick Munsters – former CIO at the €372bn Dutch civil service pension fund ABP – who left Robeco in September last year and has been appointed chief executive for asset management at the Edmond de Rothschild Group.Van Hassel has more than 30 years’ experience in the financial services industry, mainly in asset and wealth management.Between 2009 and 2013, he served as global chief executive at ING Investment Management, now NN Investment Partners.He also held various executive positions in Europe, Asia and the US at JPMorgan.Jeroen Kremers, chairman of Robeco’s supervisory board, praised Van Hassel’s “deep understanding” of the asset management business and his “truly global outlook”.Robeco Group has €269bn in asset under management, nearly half of which is on behalf of institutional investors. Robeco Institutional Asset Management has appointed Gilbert van Hassel as chief executive and chairman of the management board.From 19 September, he is to succeed Leni Boeren, who will leave the Rotterdam-based company after the handover has been completed and successors have been appointed for her other board positions within Robeco Group.Boeren took over in May, when Japanese owner Orix introduced a new group structure that saw the asset management division become one of five Robeco subsidiaries.As a consequence, three board members, including chief executive David Steyn – appointed in November – left the company.last_img read more

Local conservationist commends governments decision to abstain from voting at IWC

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first_imgLocalNews Local conservationist commends governments decision to abstain from voting at IWC by: – July 21, 2011 Sharing is caring! 10 Views   no discussions Tweet Sharecenter_img Share Share Conservationist, Mr. Atherton Martin. Photo credit: draqroom.comLocal Conservationist Atherton Martin says it is sad that some Caribbean countries continue to follow Japans pro whaling lead at the International Whaling Commission.Dominica has for the past three years abstained from voting at the IWC, as Japan and other pro whaling nations make a case for lifting an existing moratorium to allow them to resume commercial whaling.At this year’s meeting in New Jersey last week, three Caribbean states, ST Kitts and Nevis, Grenada and St Lucia joined Japan in walking out of the meeting.Martin has commended Dominica for taking a position that reflects and compliments its whale watching business.He said other OECS nations should follow Dominica’s lead.“We are still letting Japan divide us on matters that is so crucial. I am happy that Dominica continues to display what we would consider a positive position of abstaining and not even attending the IWC.” he said.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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