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Glut of properties for sale building up in London and South, says Rightmove

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first_imgMany southern regions of the UK are experiencing a glut of stock as homes take longer to sell, it has been revealed, including in the East of England where there are 25% more properties on agent’s books than a year ago.And in the South East there are 20% more homes on the market than in May last year, the latest Rightmove house price index reveals, both figures driven by an overall year-on-year 2% reduction in the number of homes being sold.The glut of properties is also significant in the South West (+8.2%) and London (+16.4%).Rightmove also says that the UK is operating as two distinct markets. In the north and Wales activity remains stronger than in the south including in Scotland, the West Midlands, the North East and North West.Consequently the number of properties available to buy in these regions is lower than a year ago, including in the Scotland and Wales, where there are 10% fewer homes to buy when compared to last May.But despite the “challenging” conditions in the south, Rightmove says overall the Spring market has not been the disaster that many agents had feared.“Sales agreed by estate agents overall in May have bounced back from a slower start to the year and while still slightly below May last year they are ahead of 2016,” says Rightmove spokesperson Miles Shipside (pictured,  left).“This is a pleasingly strong flourish at the end the spring selling season given the political uncertainty and stretched buyer affordability.”Industry reactionPatrick McCutcheon of Yorkshire estate agent Dacre, Son & Hartley (pictured, right) says he believes the current lack of homes for sale on his patch is a trend that first began a year-and-a-half ago in the South and Midlands.“It is now clear that the phenomena has migrated  northwards, and the first few months of 2018 have witnessed a noticeable reduction in the number of homes being listed,” he says.Mark Reading of online agency HouseNetwork (pictured, left) says: “We are seeing less sales aborted in 2018 with our current sales withdrawal rate at 15% compared to 22.5% last year. Buyers appear far more committed, so while there is a small delay in sales completing the chances of doing so are higher, so the market is in a better place than expected.”Read more about house prices.Rightmove patrick mccutcheon housing stock Miles Shipside dacre son hartley estate agent June 18, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Glut of properties for sale building up in London and South, says Rightmove previous nextAgencies & PeopleGlut of properties for sale building up in London and South, says RightmoveHomes are taking longer and longer to sell in the south, the portal says, while in the North they’re being “snapped up”.Nigel Lewis18th June 201801,281 Viewslast_img read more

Poor JCRs £90,000 worse off

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first_imgJCR accounts display massive disparities in Common Room wealth across the University, with annual spending in different colleges amounting to some £90,000 variation.The average JCR Budget is around £32,840 per annum, although some JCRs are directly responsible for college sports funding which burdens this budget. Those JCRs with the largest budgets primarily come from student-run money-making enterprises, such as Hertford’s bar.Hertford College has an annual JCR Budget of approximately £100,000 compared to Oriel’s meagre £9,300 a year. Hertford’s Entz budget of £10,000 a year is therefore greater than Oriel’s entire budget. This allows the JCR to provide discounts, including subsidised £1 tickets to the popular student Wednesday club-night at Lava & Ignite.Their wealth also allows Hertford to provide a large amount of money for welfare. Its welfare budget of £10,000 is more than double the funds provided by every other college surveyed, while St Peter’s budget is around the £500 mark.Other JCRs have claimed that financial difficulties have led to the decision to disaffiliate from OUSU. Oriel JCR Treasurer, James Pickering, commented on how disaffiliation has freed up funds. He noted that by “being disaffiliated from OUSU we have been able to cut such costs as welfare and Michaelmas expenditure significantly.”OUSU membership costs can be expensive. When Trinity JCR disaffiliated in Hilary Term 2007, one of the arguments in favour of disaffiliation cited that the costs involved in affiliation amounted to around a third of the JCR Budget.This problem may be resolved if OUSU goes ahead with proposed changes to its funding structure.The accounts show that JCRs vary extensively in their spending priorities. One notable difference is the amount donated to charities. Queens was found to be one of the most charitable colleges, giving away around £11,000 a year. This is only £3,000 less than St Peter’s entire JCR Budget.Comparing charitable giving is difficult as it can further vary term on term. For example, instead of its usual termly contribution of £1,100 to its chosen charities, St Hilda’s JCR outlined plans to donate £1,400 straight off to the Haiti earthquake cause.Oxford University denied that it would ever consider a centralised funding system as a way of ridding the current collegiate funding system of variations in JCR budgets and college wealth.A spokesperson said that “any variations are outweighed by the benefits to students of the college system.” They further commented that “colleges do participate in a wealth redistribution scheme already.” They went on to say that all students receive the “same treatment in essential matters” in terms of courses, lectures, and library resources.Every JCR that responded to Cherwell investigations was keen to stress its commitment to making the most of whatever funding they have available to them.Mark O’Brien, St Catz Treasurer, stressed that the JCR committee’s main role was “to bring their enthusiasm and passion” to the job by “giving as much of our time and effort as we can, not by how much we spend.”St Catz has turned to entrepreneurial techniques of raising capital. The college sought support from local restaurants and businesses to provide for events in Freshers’ Week. The JCR also intends to implement a discount card based exclusively for St Catz students by working with these businesses.The evidence of JCR disparities comes just weeks before colleges publish their annual accounts.last_img read more

Leader In Me Program Introduced To 13 Evansville Catholic Schools

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first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare TwitterFacebook Leader In Me Program Introduced To 13 Evansville Catholic SchoolsAUGUST 1ST, 2018 CHRIS MASTROBUONO EVANSVILLE, INDIANAThe Diocese of Evansville adopts a new tool to give students and teachers leadership and life-readiness skills. Officials with the Diocese made the announcement in a press conference Wednesday morning.The Leader In Me program is inspired by Stephen Covey’s ‘7-Habits of Highly Effective People’ and is a model, impacting leadership, culture, and academics. Money for the program was made through a grant from the Koch Foundation.Dr. Daryl Hagan, Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Evansville, says, “So that when teachers are teaching students, are interacting with students, are collaborating they’re putting first-things-first and they’re understanding what that means. They’re using the habits to really utilize those habits in their daily lives and more specifically in the classroom.”School officials believe this model will help the continuous improvement in Catholic education. 13 schools in the Diocese will participate in this new program and will receive grant money.Trisha Memmer, a teacher at St. John the Baptist Catholic School in Newburgh, says, “It really has the seven habits that we can incorporate in our school day it strengthens our Catholic identity, we are definitely able to really embody what this model will mean for our future.”The model will be implemented for k-12th graders across 13 schools in the Diocese.Hagan says, “In order to move students from point a to point b and then c, d, e, and f, we need to know that there is the right mix there that we have the right parameters set up.”Faculty and staff will go through a three year professional and development training. The first two days of training focuses on teachers and they bring those skills to the classroom on the final day.Memmer says, “We all have those leadership skills we all have qualities we can use to become better leaders and more successful.”Leaders say people have been grateful for their time and money and they appreciate everything.Hagan said, “This recent donation and gift from the Koch’s is a perfect example of how coming together when the community cares about their kids and Catholic schools provide such a quality Catholic academic education it’s a win-win for everyone.”Diocese officials say while 50 percent of the schools have the Leader In Me program, they hope to expand the program to other schools in the near future.last_img read more

Hoboken City Hall kicks off prostate cancer awareness month

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first_img× HOBOKEN–On Tuesday, Sept. 4 Hoboken City Hall (94 Washington St.) “turned blue” to create awareness about prostate cancer, a disease that will affect one in nine men in the U.S. The color blue is recognized as the official color to bring awareness about prostate cancer.Cities and communities across the U.S. will light more than 40 famous landmarks and buildings blue to join the Prostate CancerFoundation (PCF) in kicking-off Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.This year marks the 25th anniversary of the PCF’s efforts of advancing prostate cancer research. In honor of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, the PCF is making it the Prostate Cancer ACTION month to create awareness, spark conversations about prostate cancer, and raise funds to help accelerate research. The public is encouraged to capture the blue landmarks with photos and/or videos and post it to their social media platforms using #PCFDoBlue to help share a message of hope and solidarity for anyone affected by this disease.As part of the PCF’s DO BLUE campaign, the PCF will be premiering a new public service announcement, I’d Rather starring actor Dax Shepard as well as launching the PCF Pushup Challenge.For more information about PCF and the DO BLUE campaign, visit www.PCF.org.last_img read more

UPDATE: Silver Alert cancelled for man reported missing in South Bend

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first_img Pinterest UDPATE: The statewide Silver Alert issued on Jan. 10, for Juan Delgado has been cancelled.ORIGINAL STORY: The South Bend Police Department is investigating the disappearance of Juan Delgado, a 49 year old Hispanic male, 5 feet 4 inches tall, 130 pounds, black hair with brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a black coat, shirt and jogging pants.Juan is missing from South Bend and was last seen on Saturday, Jan. 9, at 1:30 p.m.He is believed to be in extreme danger and may require medical assistance.Anybody with information about Juan Delgado is asked to contact the South Bend Police Department at 574-255-0506 or 911. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Google+ Previous articleMan hospitalized with gunshot wounds to the legs in Benton TownshipNext articleHolcomb not anxious to sign bill that modifies his emergency powers Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. WhatsApp Google+ WhatsApp Twitter IndianaLocalNews UPDATE: Silver Alert cancelled for man reported missing in South Bend By Jon Zimney – January 9, 2021 0 228 Facebooklast_img read more

Speech: Stewardship and governance

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first_imgIntroductionI am very grateful to the Investment Association for inviting me to speak to you today, to give a government perspective on stewardship and governance.This issue is vital to promoting trust in how our major businesses are run, and in how capital is invested on behalf of society.You will be aware of the corporate governance reforms that the government is implementing following our green paper consultation last year.I welcome the positive engagement of business and investors with that reform programme. I will come on to the specifics of the policy package in a little while.But first, I would like to speak about the broader policy context within which this reform sits.Wider policy contextAs set out in the Industrial Strategy, our ambition is to make the UK the best place to start and grow a business, and to remain strongly attractive to investors.All over the world, standards of governance are advancing, employment practice is changing, and investors are becoming more discerning.Our objective is not just to sustain our advantages in these fields, but to extend them to ensure we are world beating.In this way, we will further enhance the UK’s global business reputation, whatever the future holds.Success will be seen in the reputation companies enjoy with their workforce, with consumers, and with communities.We should not take this reputation for granted.As Greg Clark said when he first launched the Industrial Strategy: I know that the majority of UK companies and their investors share this view.Yet, according to Edelman’s latest Global Trust Barometer, trust in UK business declined from 45% to 43% last year, putting us even further below the current global average of 52%.So how can we rebuild that trust?For government, it is about recognising that its approach to the regulation of business, the labour market, competition and other areas is not a zero sum game.Business success should not depend on a lowering of consumer, employment, competition or governance standards. High regulatory standards should instead be an enabler of business success.High standards are essential to maintain confidence in capitalism and free markets as a system which serves society, and not the other way round.And the government’s role in this is twofold: it is not just to set and enforce minimum standards of behaviour, but also to encourage and extend best practice.Our measure of success is not merely the avoidance of failure: it is to have a regime which attracts investment because of the confidence investors can have; which attracts employment because of the rewarding work we provide; and which creates public confidence because of the wider good that our businesses deliver.We have unfortunately seen several instances of major corporate failure in recent times, both by large quoted and large private companies.But where there has been culpable incompetence or wrong-doing, it has not gone unpunished. And obligations have been upheld.In the wake of BHS, regulators fined the audit firm £10 million and the relevant audit partner was banned from any audit work for 15 years.And £363 million was eventually secured from the former owner of the company to help BHS pensioners.Setting baseline standards and taking effective enforcement action is vitally important. But, it is not enough.Government also has an important role to play in signalling what business behaviours it admires as progressive and likely to enhance public confidence and our international reputation.We strongly embrace the principle that there is not a choice to be made between good governance and competitiveness.Well governed businesses in the modern era are more sustainable, attract more investment, and in the long term are more competitive.Government is clear – and there is plenty of research to support this view – that the best performing companies in the long term have a clear purpose and a strong set of values and beliefs.Raw pursuit of the bottom line alone is not a sufficient basis for long term success and will not engender public support.Nor will it win the support of today’s employees.Good workWe need today to adapt our employment practice to a confident younger generation who are more digital, more knowledgeable, more global.They are looking for workplaces that have values and do good in the world.Employers who want to attract and retain the best talent available need to offer more.And the framework of law, regulation and practice which guides interactions between employers and employees needs to move with the times.So government is taking forward the vast majority of the recommendations in Matthew Taylor’s ground-breaking review of modern working practices.This includes steps to improve transparency for both employees and employers, and introducing a new right for workers to request a more predictable and stable contract.The success of these and other changes will clearly depend not only on the response of workers but also of the companies that create jobs, and the shareholders who provide the capital to invest in high quality and productive employment.Most businesses and investors get this and are engaging very positively with the actions that government is taking in response to Taylor.They recognise that today in Britain we have relatively full employment – one of the great achievements of modern times – and with that choices for employees.Gone are the days when people turn up for work just to earn a daily crust.As the UK moves towards an increasingly knowledge-based economy, competitiveness will depend on having engaged and motivated workforces.Today’s employees are looking increasingly for some involvement in their workplace. Not only a sense of purpose, but also that they can play a role in improving the business.Better information, better communications and opportunity to have a say.Good leadershipLet me turn now to boards.In a successful modern economy, great business leadership needs to be valued and respected.Part of that is ensuring that it is representative of society and reflective of the opportunities a modern Britain can create.This means diversity.UK institutional investors are making board representation an increasingly important part of their stewardship activities.I am grateful in particular to Chris Cummings, the CEO of the Investment Association, for the joint letter he and Sir Philip Hampton sent to a number of FTSE350 companies on this issue earlier in the year.Although there is room for improvement, encouraging progress has been made:Women now account for 27% of FTSE350 boards, up from just 9.5% in 2011. We now have just 5 all-male boards across the FTSE350 compared to 152 in 2011. And one third of our top companies – which are mostly very international in their reach – are run by non-UK nationals.However, the proportion of female executives on boards is still low – just 8% of the FTSE350 total.Moreover, as noted by the Parker Review, the lack of representation of ethnic minorities in the boardroom remains a concern: 54% of FTSE100 companies still not do not have any ethnic minorities on their boards.So overall in corporate leadership we have made encouraging progress, but we are not yet fully representative of wider society; we are not yet world leading.Markets and competitionTurning to the wider market context, we need to recognise how rapidly consumer markets are changing with the advent of the digital economy.In many areas, such as retail, we have arguably the most advanced digital economy in the world.We want to extend that lead.But with that we need to sustain public confidence and protect vulnerable consumers.That means we need to adapt competition policy to a new fast-moving, more complex and more demanding era.We will therefore publish a review of existing competition legislation by April 2019, while looking more broadly at how the UK’s competition and consumer regime is working to support consumers and businesses, including in digital markets.On mergers and acquisitions specifically, earlier this year the Takeover Panel amended its rules to require bidders to make earlier and fuller disclosures of their plans, and give bid targets more time to prepare their response.This will further enhance the integrity and transparency of our regime, keeping the UK open to foreign direct investment which generated almost 76,000 new jobs last year.Independent Review of the FRC and CMA market study of auditNew investment also depends on the confidence investors have in what businesses tell them, and the quality of corporate reporting is absolutely integral to a high investment economy.The UK has historically had a strong reputation for the rigour of our audit profession and very high standards in financial reporting.However, recent events have raised questions about whether we need to sharpen our standards further.Creating the best place to invest means having a place where shareholders prefer to invest because they know they get the best information.This concern for high standards and public and investor confidence is why Greg Clark invited Sir John Kingman in April this year to carry out a root and branch review of the Financial Reporting Council.It central aim is to ensure that the FRC can stand as “a beacon for the best in governance, transparency and independence.”And the CMA, again following a request from Greg Clark, is separately undertaking a market study of the audit market to ensure that regulation and competition are working hand in hand to deliver high quality audit.Sir John’s review is expected to be complete by the end of the year, and the CMA expects to publish provisional findings on a similar timetable.Corporate governance reformThis leads me on to corporate governance and stewardship, the themes of today’s conference.You will be aware that the FRC recently revised its UK Corporate Governance Code and will shortly be launching a review of its Stewardship Code.The updated Governance Code includes several changes requested by Greg Clark in light of the government’s consultation on the Corporate Governance Reform green paper.Perhaps the most significant of these is the new requirement on companies to enable greater board engagement with the workforce to understand their views.All good businesses already know that this makes sense, and many already do it in practice, and very effectively. Arguably, we are ahead of many other countries.But the modern workforce is looking for more explicit recognition, and for an opportunity to help shape their company’s success.And it is this workforce which engages daily with the company’s customers, suppliers and other stakeholders.So their attitude, their satisfaction in their work and pride in the business must be vital.The new Code provision for enhanced engagement complements an important new reporting obligation covering the existing duty on a company’s directors – under Section 172 of the Companies Act.This key section of company law requires directors to pursue the success of the company for the benefit of its shareholders, while also having regard to the interests of employees and other stakeholder interests.The government has accepted concerns from investors and wider civil society, as well as from the business community, that there is currently no systematic and consistent way of assessing how companies are meeting their Section 172 duty.So the new regulations we are introducing require companies to report annually how they are engaging with employees and other stakeholders under Section 172, and to set out the impact of this on directors’ decision-making.So that you, the shareholder stewards, will have a clear account of how boardrooms are approaching the issue.As recognised in the rich range of responses to the green paper from UK investors, this is not about increasing stakeholder rights at the expense of shareholder rights.Their interests are not diametrically opposed, as we have discussed, but inter-linked.A company which engages effectively with its employees, its customers, suppliers and other stakeholders will be more competitive, more sustainable and better able to create value in the long-term.I welcome, in this context, the new GC100 guidance, produced at Greg Clark’s request and published recently, which provides practical help to directors on their performance of the section 172 duty.And also the earlier joint guidance published by the Investment Association and ICSA on ‘The Stakeholder Voice in Board Decision-Making’.The effect is cumulative. We have the Code changes. We have the new section 172 reporting requirement. We have business and investor led guidance.And shortly, we will have a set of governance principles for large private companies through the work and leadership of James Wates and his team.The effect is, for the first time, to lock the importance of real boardroom engagement with stakeholders into the UK’s formal corporate governance architecture.To bring our business leaders into frequent, productive exchange with their employees, customers, and suppliers, as well as shareholders.Executive pay reformAlongside the section 172 measures, our corporate governance reform package introduces new reporting obligations on executive pay.The headline measure here is the requirement – from next year – for quoted companies to disclose and explain each year the ratio of their CEO’s pay to the median and quartiles of the company’s UK employees.Ministers have made clear that the intention here is not to prescribe what a ‘good’ or ‘bad’ pay ratio looks like.But ministers do want pay ratio reporting to drive companies to reflect on, and then explain, how they believe their approach to pay in the board-room aligns with pay and reward across the rest of the company.And we must acknowledge that executive pay remains an issue of public concern.It is actually the biggest barrier to UK public trust in business according to Edelman’s latest Trust Barometer, with 58% citing it as a problem.And with the median FTSE100 CEO earning £4 million last year, compared to £28,000 for the median UK worker, that is perhaps not hard to understand.I should nonetheless acknowledge the growing role of investors in challenging unjustified pay outcomes.As part of this, the government was pleased to accept the Investment Association’s proposal to establish a public register of those companies that experience significant shareholder dissent on executive pay or other issues.The register is now almost a year old and is serving not just as a list of companies that encounter shareholder dissent, but as a platform to highlight any action that a company chooses to take to address shareholder concerns.I also welcome the publication today of the Investment Association’s updated executive remuneration guidance for companies.This provides more stringent guidance on post-employment holding periods for shares and share options, better clawback provisions for performance pay where there has been dereliction of duty and closer alignment between pension benefits for directors and the wider workforce.All in all, the government’s corporate governance reforms, supported by business- and investor-led action, are intended to help reinforce the UK’s world leading approach to governance.And this in turn provides crucial underpinning for the Industrial Strategy to make this the best country in which to invest and do business.Final remarksI set out at the beginning of this speech how public support for a free market economy depends upon ensuring the system is seen to serve society, and not the other way around.All the policy areas I have referenced today are intended to support this goal.It means no race to the bottom on employment standards, no dilution of the rigour of our competition regime and no letting up in the UK being a world leader in corporate governance and stewardship, in audit and financial reporting.The UK must remain a high standards economy. And we must move with the times and reflect the attitudes and aspirations of a changing society in a changing world.This depends on the vital role that UK investors can and increasingly do play to help maintain those standards.Good stewards are active stewards. They recognise that a company’s long-term success depends on how it articulates its purpose and invests in its culture and values.On how it engages with and treats its employees, customers, suppliers and local communities.Where they see that pay ratios are out of line and unjustified, they apply pressure to put things right.Where they see that employee or stakeholder engagement is inadequate and inconsistent with running a sustainable, long term business, they insist that it is improved.We see many encouraging signs that this is happening. But we are ambitious for more.Because we want to be the best.Thank you very much. We have a worldwide reputation for fair dealing, but also examples of behaviour that tarnish the good name of business. This is no time to lower our sights or our standards. This country will never win a race to the bottom.last_img read more

PHOTOS: Matisyahu At Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas, 11/12/17

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first_imgMatisyahu | Brooklyn Bowl | Las Vegas, NV | 11/12/2017 | Photo: Erik Kabik Load remaining images On Sunday evening, rapper and beatboxer Matisyahu tore up Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas with a characteristically fiery performance. Currently, Matisyahu is in the midst of his extensive fall tour, with Sunday’s performance marking the beginnings of the tour’s west coast leg—until the end of November, Matisyahu will be performing across California, Oregon, and Washington, before landing in Colorado in the beginning of December.Spafford Welcomes Matisyahu During Wild ‘Lion King’ Halloween Show [Video/Photo]Check out photos from last night’s performance at Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas below, courtesy of photographer Erik Kabik.last_img read more

Food contest winner

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first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaCaroline Harless had planned to be in Swainsboro, Ga., on March 17 to prepare for hunters arriving at her Flat Creek Lodge. Instead, she stayed in Atlanta, where her Flat Creek Aztec Cheddar cheese won the third annual Flavor of Georgia food products contest.“I’m just still amazed. Amazed,” she said after Gov. Sonny Perdue announced her cheese as the 2009 grand prize winner.Flavor of Georgia 2009 was held in conjunction with Georgia Ag Day, which kicked off National Agricultural Awareness Week in Georgia. The events took place at the Georgia Freight Depot in downtown Atlanta.“I was impressed by the range of products submitted by Georgia food entrepreneurs. Despite challenging economic times, we received 112 submissions from 81 businesses from all over Georgia,” said Sharon Kane, who directed the contest. She is also a food business development specialist for the University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development.This was the first year that cheeses were entered in the contest, and judges took notice. “It’s definitely a cheddar,” Harless said of the Aztec cheddar. “It’s not as sharp as English or Vermont cheddar. It’s a little softer. It also has a … hint of cocoa and chili. It’s very subtle.”Flat Creek’s head cheese maker and culinary scientist Dane Huebner developed Aztec cheddar in the spring of 2008. He added cocoa and guajilla peppers to traditional, milled curd cheddar. The result is a cream-colored cheese marbled with brown and orange.“Dane is a very talented scientist, very much a food person,” Harless said. “He’s got a lot of great ideas cooking.” His next cheese project is of the sheep variety. Flat Creek Lodge currently has 40 ewes and 40 newly born lambs. Once the lambs are weaned, Huebner plans to develop different varieties of sheep’s milk cheese.Flavor of Georgia 2009 had entries as varied as peanut butter and jelly cookies, shrimp salad, jalapeno raspberry jam and peach cobbler bread.Flat Creek won the dairy category before being named overall winner. Christopher Myhre of Buzzy’s Fine Foods won the barbecue and hot sauces category with Buzzy’s Savannah Slather. Cathy Beecher of Cathy’s Sweets Inc. won the confections category with Lite Buddy candy. Janice Walters-Taylor of Appalachian Kitchens won the jams, jellies and sauces category with Miss Chatelaine’s Winter Apple Cider and Honey Spiced Red Wine Jam. Andrew Thompson of Thompson Farms won the meat category with All Natural Pork Chops. Kathy Werner of Mitera Granola won the snack foods category with Georgia Peach Granola. Douglas Horn of Vidalia Valley won the other/miscellaneous category for Southern Peach Vinaigrette. Flavor of Georgia is only a starting point for many of the category winners, Kane said. She followed up with the 2008 winners and found that nearly 90 percent increased their business contacts as a result of the contest. Also, 73 percent experienced increased interest in their products, and 70 percent saw an increase in the publicity for their products.“More than one-half of last year’s contestants saw an increase in their sales and profits following the contest,” she said.Flavor of Georgia 2009 was sponsored by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia Agribusiness Council, the Governor’s Agricultural Advisory Commission and the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Food Science and Technology. (Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Kenyan environmental tribunal cancels license for contested Lamu coal power plant

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first_imgKenyan environmental tribunal cancels license for contested Lamu coal power plant FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Daily Nation:The setting up of a coal plant in Lamu County now stands in limbo after an environment tribunal cancelled the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) license for the controversial project.The National Environment Tribunal (Net) on Wednesday faulted the National Environment Management Authority (Nema) for failing to conduct a proper EIA.Nema was also faulted for granting the project an EIA license that “appears to be generic and not specific to the project.”The tribunal said constructors of the coal plant omitted engineering plans and key facts of the project from public participation as well as failure to take consideration of Climate Change Act.The tribunal directed the coal company, Amu Power, and Nema to start a new EIA licensing process and ensure they comply with the law.More: Lamu coal plant in limbo as environment permit is cancelledlast_img read more

A 2020 forecast on the banking and payments industry

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first_img continue reading » According to Bloomberg’s analysis of United Nations’ data, Generation Z this year comprises 32% of the global population. By 2020, Gen Z consumers will have a greater impact on global banking and payments than ever before as they encroach on the market and emerge as the main customer base for banks. As the first generation of true digital natives, this transition will create a fundamental shift in how banking is consumed.Gen Z will drive an increase in conversational finance – specifically chatbots. We have already seen this happen in China, which has a very young population. There, the tech-savvy youth are embracing mobile payments and WeChat Pay at an ever increasing rate – according to Shrey Rastogi, Senior payments Strategist at Temenos. In fact, WeChat Pay is on track to handle one billion payments annually. As China adapts its banking models to suit this new customer base, in 2020 we will see the rest of the world follow suit.Gen Z may not represent the most profitable customer base for banks at the moment. However, their numbers and influence will soon become so significant that banks will have no choice but to redesign their services to suit their needs and requirements. In 2020, banks will need to incentivise their products and services, adding value, personalisation and even gamification techniques in order to retain a customer base that is by nature less loyal to their bank than previous generations.” 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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