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The influence of seasonal variation, diet and physical activity on Ssrum lipids in young men in Antarctica

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first_imgThe long-term effects of diet, physical activity and seasonal variation on serum lipids have been studied over a period of one year (1961) in members of the British and South African Antarctic Surveys based at Halley Bay (75.30°S) and Sanae (70.30°S). The duration of the study spanned roughly three seasons: (1) February to April (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –12 to –21°c., strenuous activity and average daily food intake of 3,850 calories; (2) April to September (winter) with polar night and outside temperatures ranging from –23 to –35°c., minimal activity and a food intake of 3,363 calories; and (3) September to January (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –6 to –14°c., strenuous activity (including sledging journeys) and food intake of 3,663 calories. Seasonal changes in serum total cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride levels were minimal although physical activity and dietary intake showed considerable variation; the latter factors apparently balancing each other. The changes in the alpha- and beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were significant. In winter beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels rose significantly while alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol levels fell significantly. Similar significant changes were shown after sledging journeys; increased activity and energy expenditure resulting in decreased beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration with a corresponding increase in alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. One month after the sledging journeys, the levels had returned to those which existed before sledging. Studies with subjects spending their second year in the polar regions showed attenuation of all lipid parameters investigated.last_img read more

Director, UF Genetics Institute (57462)

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first_imgThe University of Florida (UF) invites applicants for the full-timeposition of Director for the UF Genetics Institute ( www.ufgi.ufl.edu ). The Directorreports to the UF Vice President for Research.The aim of the UF Genetics Institute (UFGI) is to promoteexcellence in genetics and genomics at the University of Floridaby: (1) building community, facilitating collaboration, andcreating opportunities for intellectual exchanges amonginvestigators using diverse systems to study genetics and genomics,(2) supporting recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty ingenetics and genomics, (3) supporting graduate education ingenetics and genomics and (4) enhancing the ability of researchersat the University of Florida to compete for multidisciplinaryresearch grants in genetics and genomics.The 226-member faculty of the UFGI represents seven colleges and 51academic departments, as well as the libraries and the FloridaMuseum of Natural History. During the 2019-2020 academic year, UFGIinvestigators secured $102 million in sponsored research support,filed 55 US, patents and published 881 scholarly articles. ThreeUFGI members were cited as being among the top 1% of mosthighly-cited researchers world-wide over the last 10 years.The UFGI occupies one of two wings in the 270,000 square-footCancer & Genetics Research Complex, completed in 2006.Twenty-four UFGI faculty members from the Colleges of Medicine,Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Agriculture and Life Sciences arehoused in UFGI space, which provides a variety of shared equipmentfor molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics, as well as sharedworkspaces such as animal facilities, growth chambers forcontrolled environmental studies of plants, and a greenhousefacility. The UFGI has a weekly seminar series, an annualinternational genetics symposium, and a variety of regularlyscheduled focus group meetings in areas such as epigenetics,developmental biology, and RNA biology.Uniquely among UF Institutes, the UFGI maintains its own graduateprogram, the Genetics & Genomics Graduate Program (G&G),which emphasizes computational and analytic training in conjunctionwith wet laboratory experience, leading to the Ph.D. degree.Currently, the Graduate Program has 30 students training in 11different departments in 5 colleges. The UFGI also directs ascience education outreach program for underserved ruralcommunities in North central Florida. As part of this program,graduate students from G&G and other programs at UF travel tohigh schools in neighboring counties where they engage the localstudents in classroom-based scientific experiments and talk abouttheir own choice to pursue science as a career.ResponsibilitiesThe Director will be responsible for leading and facilitating theUniversity-wide strategic research initiatives in genetics,genomics, and the educational goals of the UFGI. This will includethe coordination, design, performance, and evaluation ofeducational and research programs within the Institute, researchacquisition (grant acquisition and fundraising), and development ofboth the faculty and the facility.Background InformationThe University of Florida is a top-10, public, land-grant researchuniversity, as well as the state’s oldest and most comprehensivehigher education institution. With 16 colleges and more than 170research centers and institutes on its Gainesville campus, UF isamong the nation’s six most academically diverse universities. Amember of the prestigious Association of American Universities, UFis consistently ranked among the nation’s best institutions: No. 6in U.S. News & World Report’s “Top Public Schools”(2020).UF is a leader in research and discoveries which improve the livesof individuals throughout the state, nation and world. Its 6,000faculty members had a record $928.6 million in researchexpenditures in 2019, with major funding from the public andprivate sectors. These research collaborations occur in diversefields that include human, animal and agricultural life sciences,engineering and the physical and social sciences.The university is also recognized as an international leader intechnology commercialization, dating back to its development of thesports drink, Gatorade in the 1960s. UF Innovate ( http://innovate.research.ufl.edu/) is regularly ranked among the top 10 institutions in the nationfor technology licensing, patents and start-ups, as ranked by theAssociation of University Technology Managers, and its two businessincubators have been named best in the world on severaloccasions.Candidates should have a Ph.D., M.D., or appropriate doctoraldegree, with an internationally recognized record of researchachievement in genetics and/or genomics, with appropriateadministrative experience.All applicants should apply at https://jobs.ufl.edu Requisition number57462. Application packages must include the following: (1)cover letter, (2) curriculum vitae, (3) a statementof leadership philosophy and administrative vision for the UFGI,and (4) the names, addresses and telephone numbers of threeprofessional references. Review of applications will beginimmediately and will continue until the position isfilled.The University of Florida is dedicated to excellence, equalopportunities, diversity, and inclusivity. The selection processwill be conducted in accord with the provisions of Florida’s‘Government in the Sunshine’ and Public Records Laws. Persons withdisabilities have the right to request and receive reasonableaccommodation.We highly encourage applications from women, minorities, andpersons with disabilities.Questions about the position may be directed to J. Glenn Morris(Chair of the Search Committee) at [email protected] or (352)273-7526.Final candidate will need to provide an official transcript tocomplete the hiring process. A transcript will not be considered“official” if a designation of “Issued to Student” is visible.Degrees earned from an educational institution outside of theUnited States are required to be evaluated by a professionalcredentialing service provider approved by the National Associationof Credential Evaluation Services (NACES), which can be found athttp://www.naces.org/ .The University of Florida is an equal opportunity institutiondedicated to building a broadly diverse and inclusive faculty andstaff. If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to applyfor this position, please call 352/392-2477 or the Florida RelaySystem at 800/955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibilityto work in the US. Searches are conducted in accordance withFlorida’s Sunshine Law.#category=104The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining.last_img read more

How Many Hours Should Online Students Spend Learning?

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first_imgHow much time should online students spend learning?After the state lost $47 million from two now-defunct virtual charter schools enrolling thousands of inactive students, Indiana lawmakers want to make sure online students are showing up.A new proposal that sailed through the House last week would seek to define online attendance and add steep consequences for students and schools when those enrolled don’t spend enough time on schoolwork or take standardized tests. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare “This kind of teaching can be very beneficial, but it’s not beneficial if the machine is never turned on and the student never participates,” said Rep. Ed DeLaney, D-Indianapolis.State lawmakers have been walking a tightrope on virtual charter schools: In recent years, they have taken small steps to crack down on the publicly funded sector’s low academic results, while not wanting to impose too many regulations on what they see as an important school choice option for students struggling in brick-and-mortar settings.But at the state’s remaining virtual charter schools, officials protested online education being painted with a broad brush because of the problems at Indiana Virtual School and Indiana Virtual Pathways Academy, which they say were isolated incidents of wrongdoing.“It’s not what’s happening across the board. It’s just not,” said Chandre Sanchez, executive director of two virtual charter schools, Indiana Connections Academy and Indiana Connections Career Academy. “It feels like an over-reaction.”State and local oversight officials found last year that Indiana Virtual School and Indiana Virtual Pathways Academy took in about $47 million combined in state funding for thousands of students who weren’t actively attending the online schools. While claiming perfect attendance rates, the two schools over-reported enrollment by keeping on their rolls students who hadn’t logged in for months, students who had moved out of state, and even at least one student who had died.School officials denied inflating enrollment, but the two troubled virtual charter schools closed in August under the weight of the scandal. The state recovered about $7 million before the closures.Under last week’s proposal, if a virtual charter school student doesn’t participate enough or doesn’t take the state’s mandatory tests, that student will be barred from continuing to attend virtual charter schools and the school will lose funding for that student.The two Connections schools, along with the virtual charter network that includes Hoosier Academy of Indianapolis and Insight School of Indiana, have slightly lower attendance rates than most brick-and-mortar schools — between 86% and 90%.They follow the same state attendance requirements as other schools, officials say: 180 days of instruction, with five hours per day for elementary students and six hours per day for middle- and high-school students.Test participation rates at those four virtual charter schools hover just under or at the state average. Getting students to show up for standardized tests is one of the toughest challenges virtual charter schools face, since they have to arrange test-taking sites across the state and sometimes provide transportation for students.For 2017-18, the most recent state A-F grades available, Hoosier Academy and Insight received Cs. Connections had a D, and Connections Career Academy was not rated because that was its first year open. Another school in the Hoosier Academies network, Hoosier Academy Virtual Charter School, closed in 2018 after eight straight years of F grades.Officials raised concerns that the proposed legislation would single out virtual charter schools — not applying the same consequences for truant students or students who miss state tests at brick-and-mortar schools or fast-growing district-run virtual programs.“It just doesn’t seem very fair,” said Jeff Kwitowski, senior vice president of public affairs for K12 Inc., the national for-profit online education company that manages Hoosier Academy and Insight. “If it’s a good policy to do it, do it across the board.”Officials also pointed out that a law approved last year already requires virtual charter schools to withdraw truant students and report attendance policies to their local oversight agencies.In addition, state education officials are working on new rules for online programs that could craft mandates for onboarding, tracking attendance, and engaging students, though it’s unclear how far those regulations could go. The state board of education expects to discuss potential new rules later this year.DeLaney said his proposal offers “a way to honestly monitor the virtuals. [Officials] don’t have to insult them, but they can put them under a limitation that’s effective.”Despite last year’s fraud allegations at Indiana Virtual School and Indiana Virtual Pathways Academy, state lawmakers were poised to skip addressing virtual schools this session until Delaney tacked these last-minute provisions onto another education bill about enrollment.House education leader Bob Behning, R-Indianapolis, had said he wanted to see the results of pending state and federal investigations into the two troubled virtual charter schools before considering new legislation.The late addition of virtual school matters means there wasn’t a chance for much public debate, but it could get more discussion as the bill moves to the Senate for consideration.Still, the Democratic-led proposal received an unusual show of bipartisan support in the Republican-controlled House.After his party shot down a flurry of Democratic suggestions, the Republican lawmaker behind the enrollment bill asked his colleagues to back DeLaney’s addition to virtual charter schools: “I hope you vote for it,” Rep. Robert Cherry said.Delaney paused, unsure.“He … he said he liked it, Ed,” House Speaker Brian Bosma explained to a bewildered DeLaney, prompting laughter in the chamber.The virtual school provisions passed 93-0. Republicans, including Behning, backed the proposal “to send a message,” he said, “that there are concerns.”center_img How many hours should online students spend learning? Indiana Could Pick A Number.By Stephanie Wanglast_img read more

SEALS, PAUL

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first_img71, died on April 22, 2017 at his daughter’s home in Bayonne. Born June 24, 1945, in Parkton, North Carolina, the son of the late Mary Anderson Seals and William Thomas Seals, he lived in Jersey City most of his life before moving to Bayonne in 1992. He was a longtime member of the Commission for the Blind. Father of John (Barbara), Paul (Angela), Tara Hellenbeck (Derek), Michael (Lisa), Joseph (Laura), Dawn Collazo (Al) and Toni Ann. Grandfather of Ian, Sean, Brandy, Nicholas, Ryan, Courtney, Joshua, Kayla, Antonio, Hailey, Adrian, Ethan, Isabel, Sophia, Zachary and Logan. Brother of Earl and the late Noah, Willa Mae, Barbara Jean, Donna and Liz. In lieu of flowers, please donate to: St. Joseph’s School for the Blind 761 Summit Ave. Jersey City 07307. Funeral arrangements by GREENVILLE MEMORIAL HOME, 374 Danforth Ave, Jersey City.last_img read more

Major Rager Augusta To Host George Clinton & P-Funk, James Brown Band, & Taz

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first_imgThe Major Rager has been going down for five years in Augusta, Georgia, coinciding with the kickoff of the annual Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Course every April—the first Major Championship each summer. Today, The Major Rager Augusta announced its lineup for this year, with scheduled performances by George Clinton & Parliament-Funkadelic and the James Brown Band featuring a number of special guests on Friday, April 6th, 2018. In 2018, the event has also invited the young guitar prodigy Brandon “Taz” Niederauer to serve as artist-at-large.The Major Rager Brings The Flaming Lips, Moon Taxi, & Eric Krasno Band To The Green [Videos]Tickets are available on Friday, January 12th at 10 a.m. (EST) at TheMajorRager.com & FWBpro.com. With a tiered ticketing system, early-bird pricing expires on Friday, January 25th, at 10 a.m., so make sure to snag your tickets quickly before they rise in pricing. Furthermore, in keeping with the golf theme of the event, The Major Rager will also be offering “FORE!” packs, which allow attendees to buy a four-pack of tickets at a discounted price. Plus, in addition to these main performances at Augusta Common in downtown Augusta, GA, the event will also host Everyone Orchestra for an official late-night afterparty.last_img read more

Across Harvard, art you can touch

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first_img 8A reproduction of the bronze lion erected in the 12th century in the castle square in Brunswick by Duke Henry is now at the Center for European Studies. 1An aspect of Oracle: Portentous by Marianna Pineda, which sits beside the Schlesinger Library on the grounds of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. 13Presence by Mary Frank is at Hamilton Hall at Harvard Business School. 14The marble stele Harvard Bixi sits outside Widener Library. 11Alexander Calder’s Onion adorns the Pusey Library. In the encircled garden alongside Schlesinger Library in Radcliffe Yard, the oracle Portentous receives and transmits knowledge, ancient wisdom guiding future voices. The bronze sculpture by Marianna Pineda was dedicated to Constance E. Smith, the first dean of Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study (1961-1970).“The physical form is set off or liberated from normal worldly boundaries. The feet are not connected to the ground. They are kind of floating. And the arms are kind of out of control,” observes sculptor and artist Nora Schultz, assistant professor of Visual and Environmental Studies. “It is shifting into another sphere, where gesture, gravity, and weight mean something different.”Portentous is just one of the outdoor sculptures — cast in bronze, carved from marble, or chiseled from stone — that dot the campus, inviting contemplation, inciting inspiration, at times challenging perception. They occupy both public and private spaces, silent but monumental parts of the Harvard-Radcliffe community.“Every day you go this way to work or school, you always pass the same object and you develop a certain relationship with it. You see how it changes with different seasons,” Schultz said. “They can really influence phases of your life in a certain way.” 17An untitled 2003 work by Joel Shapiro at Morgan Hall at Harvard Business School. 7Appropriately, Myron’s Discobolus welcomes athletes to the Hemenway Gymnasium. 15Night Wall I by Louise Nevelson is at Hauser Hall at Harvard Law School. 12A fountain in Radcliffe’s Sunken Garden. 6Child Hall at Harvard Law School.center_img 3A Chinese lion stands guard in front of the Harvard-Yenching Library. 18Over the Earth by Tony Cragg is at the Dean’s House at Harvard Business School. 10Katherine Ward Lane Weems’ rhinoceroses Vicky and Bess flank the doors at the Biological Laboratories. 5Peter Walker designed the Tanner Fountain at the Science Center. 16Latent (e)Scapes by Christina Geros MAUD, M.L.A. ’15, lights up Radcliffe Yard. 9The Peabody Museum has a replica of a classic Maya stele from the ruins of Copan. 4Surfacing Stone by Martin Bechthold at Gund Hall at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. 2Red, Blue by Ellsworth Kelly is at Peabody Terrace. 19Daniel Chester French’s ever-popular John Harvard Statue in front of University Hall draws crowds of visitors.last_img read more

College seeks to promote dialogue

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first_imgDialogue can be difficult to manage while still maintaining respect. However, by replicating the format of Conversation Cafes, an organization started in Seattle, Saint Mary’s has sought to find a way to engage students and promote productive dialogue. The President’s Council on Inclusivity and Multicultural Diversity along with the help of director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership, Mara Derakhshani and others helped to make this opportunity possible.“Our hope is always to encourage mutual understanding and dialogue across difference to create a more welcoming and inclusive campus,” Derakhshani said.There are specific rules and formats of Conversation Cafes designed to help make it successful. In the first two rounds of conversation every participant is welcome to talk, however participants pass around a talking object and are asked not to interrupt one another. In the last round, discussion is opened up to cross conversations for anyone to talk and share their opinions.“In the Conversation Cafes, we are hoping to create a safe space where everyone feels free to express their perspective and feels listened to non-judgmentally.” Derakhshani said. “The goal is to foster respectful civil discourse and create a welcoming community for all.”Director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement Rebekah Go has advertised and helped students preregister for this event. This year there are around 70 participants: a mix of faculty, students and staff. The conversations take place on November 6 and 7 at four different time slots throughout the day.“What we really want is a mix of people whose experiences are different, so we did try and place people in different groups given their preferred time slots,” Go said. “We generally kept groups to nine people or fewer plus a facilitator.”Faculty and staff will participate as well as serve as facilitators throughout the conversation, making the purpose of the event known while enforcing rules and guidelines.In the 2017 and 2018 cafes’ success was found through the controversial topics such as the potential divisions caused by the 2016 election and the overall inclusivity of the campus.“The last two rounds of Conversation Cafes encouraged participants to discuss ways in which the campus was welcoming and inclusive generally,” Derakhshani said. “This year, we are focusing more specifically on the Catholic identity of the College and hoping that participants will share what it means to them to be/work at a Catholic college and how that impacts their lives.”This year’s Conversation Cafes prompt focuses on the College’s Catholic identity.“Speaking from your own personal perspective and identity, what does it mean to you that Saint Mary’s College is a Catholic institution?” the prompt reads. “In what ways does the College’s Catholic identity enhance, or perhaps limit, your experience here? In what ways do you believe the College’s identity affects how welcoming a community Saint Mary’s is?”The current conversation originally was brought to attention by the Better Together clubs’ interfaith conference in the spring of 2018.“We want to discuss how our Catholic character on campus and how that can feel inclusive or exclusive to people of other faith backgrounds,” Go said. “Anytime we increase dialogue on difficult or controversial topics that is a good thing, but I would hope that people from these conversations are also able to understand perspectives they hadn’t previously thought of and able to then integrate that new learning into how they relate to people and their peers.”Tags: Conversation Cafes, dialogue, saint mary’slast_img read more

The Wiz Tapped for NBC’s Next Live Broadcast Before B’way

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first_imgReady to feel a brand new day? NBC will present a live broadcast of Charlie Smalls and William F. Brown’s The Wiz this year. The ‘70s take on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz will hit the small screen on December 3. Entering into a unique partnership with NBC on The Wiz—to be executive produced by Craig Zadan and Neil Meron—is Cirque du Soleil, whose new stage theatrical division will co-produce the live TV event and then present it as a Broadway revival for the 2016-17 season. Casting for both the NBC telecast and Cirque du Soleil’s Great White Way production will be announced at a later date.Tony Award-winning director Kenny Leon will stage both the television production and Broadway revival of The Wiz in collaboration with Tony winner and Broadway icon Harvey Fierstein, who will contribute new material to the original Broadway book by Brown. The Wiz follows the familiar L. Frank Baum story of Dorothy and her adventures in Oz, but with a rock-filled revamp. Smalls’ soulful score includes show tunes that have transcended the divide between theater and mainstream pop culture, including “Ease on Down the Road,” “No Bad News” and “Home.”The show premiered on Broadway in 1975 and won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical later that year. The 1978 film adaptation starred Diana Ross, Michael Jackson and Lena Horne. The last major New York production took place in 2009 as part of New York City Center’s Encores! program and starred Grammy winner Ashanti, Aladdin Tony winner James Monroe Iglehart, LaChanze, Joshua Henry and more.The musical was previously reported as a contender for this year’s pick, along with The Music Man. This marks the third annual live musical broadcast for the Peacock network, following the gangbusters The Sound of Music Live! and the less-but-still-moderately successful Peter Pan. Fox will follow suit early next year with a live presentation of Grease with Vanessa Hudgens and Julianne Hough. Also on the NBC table is a live telecast of Aaron Sorkin’s A Few Good Men.No Great White Way theater has been announced for the revival, but Cirque has been rumored to be looking at making a long-term home at the Lyric, where On the Town is currently playing. However, the Lyric is owned by the Ambassador Theatre Group and Zadan and Meron’s recently reported Main Stem production deal is with the Shuberts, who own 17 other Broadway theaters. View Commentslast_img read more

Home Alone! Yen’s Cast & Creative Team Are Ready for Off-Broadway

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first_imgThe cast & creative team of ‘Yen'(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Show Closed This production ended its run on March 4, 2017 Lucas Hedges Star Files Yencenter_img Manchester by the Sea standout Lucas Hedges as well as stage and screen stars Ari Graynor, Stefania LaVie Owen, Justice Smith and Jack DiFalco are poised for the American premiere of Anna Jordan’s Yen. Directed by Trip Cullman, Yen tells the story of Bobbie (Smith) and Hench (Hedges) whose days home alone are spent streaming porn, playing video games and watching the world go by; it’s chaos when they’re absent mother visits (which is rarely). However, when animal-loving neighbor Jenny (Owen) takes an interest in their dog Taliban, the boys discover a world far beyond what they know. Yen is scheduled to begin performances at MCC’s Lucille Lortel Theatre on January 12, 2017 and officially open on January 30. The limited engagement will run through February 19. Take a look at Broadway.com’s hot shot of the cast, scribe and director, and be sure to see the show! Related Shows View Commentslast_img read more

Designation Targets Companies and Individuals in Guadalajara, Mexico

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first_img Caro Quintero was the mastermind behind the kidnapping and murder of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent (SA) Enrique Camarena in 1985. On June 13, The U.S. Department of the Treasury designated 18 individuals and 15 entities linked to Rafael Caro Quintero, a Mexican drug trafficker. Rafael Caro Quintero is a significant Mexican narcotics trafficker who began his criminal career in the late 1970s when he and others, including Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno (a.k.a. “El Azul”), formed the Guadalajara drug cartel and amassed an illicit fortune. These individuals own and/or manage a variety of companies in Guadalajara, which were also designated. These companies include: ECA Energéticos, S.A. de C.V., a gas station company; El Baño de Maria, S. de R.L. de C.V., a bath and beauty products store; Pronto Shoes, S.A. de C.V. (a.k.a. CX-Shoes), a shoe company; and Hacienda Las Limas, S.A. de C.V., a resort spa. OFAC targeted members of the Sánchez Garza family, including the family patriarch, José de Jesus Sánchez Barba, along with his three sons, Mauricio Sánchez Garza, José de Jesus Sánchez Garza, and Diego Sánchez Garza. Mauricio Sánchez Garza is currently a fugitive from money laundering charges in the Western District of Texas (San Antonio). In addition, Michael Adib Madero; Diego Contreras Sánchez; and Luis Cortés Villaseñor were designated. The action targets six of Rafael Caro Quintero’s family members, including his children Héctor Rafael Caro Elenes, Roxana Elizabeth Caro Elenes, Henoch Emilio Caro Elenes, and Mario Yibran Caro Elenes, his wife, María Elizabeth Elenes Lerma, and his daughter-in-law, Denisse Buenrostro Villa. Humberto Vargas Correa, a longtime personal secretary of Caro Quintero, was also designated. Caro Quintero is also wanted in the Central District of California on criminal charges related to the kidnapping and murder of SA Camarena as well as drug trafficking. “Rafael Caro Quintero has used a network of family members and front persons to invest his fortune into ostensibly legitimate companies and real estate projects in the city of Guadalajara” said Adam Szubin, Director of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). “With the assistance of the Government of Mexico, OFAC continues to target drug traffickers, the laundering of their ill-gotten gains, and those who assist them in their illicit activities.” The U.S. Department of the Treasury identified Caro Quintero and Esparragoza Moreno as significant foreign narcotics traffickers pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act) in 2000 and 2003, respectively. Caro Quintero continues his alliance with Esparragoza Moreno’s organization and its key players, such as the previously-designated individual Juvencio Ignacio González Parada. By Dialogo June 17, 2013 The action, pursuant to the Kingpin Act, generally prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with these designees, and also freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction. Following his capture in the same year, Caro Quintero was convicted in Mexico for his involvement in SA Camarena’s murder and drug trafficking and is currently serving a 40 year prison sentence there. OFAC also designated the following additional Sánchez Garza family members: Beatriz Garza Rodriguez, wife of José de Jesus Sánchez Barba; Hilda Riebeling Cordero, wife of Mauricio Sánchez Garza; and Ernesto Sánchez González and Rubén Sánchez González, both cousins of the Sánchez Garza family. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. These designated individuals own and/or manage the following Guadalajara based companies, which were also designated: Grupo Fracsa, S.A. de C.V. and Dbardi, S.A. de C.V., real estate development companies; Grupo Constructor Segundo Milenio, S.A. de C.V., a construction company; Restaurant Bar Los Andariegos (a.k.a. Barbaresco Restaurant), a restaurant; and Piscilanea S.A. de C.V. (a.k.a. Albercas y Tinas Barcelona), a swimming pool company. last_img read more

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