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Montreal Port Gets Government Backing

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first_imgzoom Canada’s Montreal Port Authority (MPA) has welcomed the Quebec government’s support for the marine industry through an investment of more than CAD 1.5 billion (USD 1.18 bn) in the Quebec maritime strategy, as well as its intention to promote the implementation of logistics hubs. For the MPA, concrete investments are CAD 75 million to improve direct road access to the port and CAD 20 million towards the restoration of Alexandra Pier and the Iberville Passenger Terminal for cruise passengers.“Having a new passenger terminal bolsters the development of the tourism industry and promotes major economic benefits and impacts for Montreal and the various levels of government, while giving citizens quality access to the river and creating an emblematic gateway worthy of Montreal,” said Sylvie Vachon, President and CEO of the Montreal Port Authority.The Quebec government’s commitment is in addition to the backing by the City of Montreal, which committed to a CAD 15-million contribution when it filed its three-year capital works program for 2015-2017.last_img read more

New Job Opportunities for Income Assistance Recipients

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first_imgNova Scotians who receive income assistance now have more options to help them on their journey back to work and to earn some extra money, thanks to a new program from the Department of Community Services. Harvest Connection is a voluntary program that links income assistance recipients to job opportunities in rural communities during harvest season. Individuals who have received income assistance for six months can earn up to $3,000 a year, on top of their basic income assistance, by harvesting crops like apples, vegetables and Christmas trees. “Harvest Connection will benefit farmers and income assistance recipients who are looking for work in their community,” said Community Services Minister Judy Streatch. “We’ve heard from farmers and producers and we know there is a serious shortage of seasonal workers to harvest their crops. Harvest Connection will help some of our clients return to work while addressing a pressing need for help to complete the harvest.” “We are pleased to support rural Nova Scotia and the agriculture industry through this new initiative,” said Brooke Taylor, Minister of Agriculture. “It will provide additional labour options for the farming community throughout the province.” One of the most significant challenges identified by the agriculture and Christmas tree industries is a shortage of seasonal workers to successfully harvest crops. “Accessible labour is important to our success and our ability to get our product to market,” said Greg Webster, president of Webster Farms Limited in Cambridge, Kings Co., and human resources chair for Horticulture Nova Scotia. “This change should improve the availability of seasonal workers during the critical harvest period.” “It’s getting tougher every year to attract seasonal labour. Having more local workers available to help us harvest Christmas trees would be great,” said Dwight Herman, vice-president of the Nova Scotia Christmas Tree Council and manager of Kirk Forest Products in Bridgewater. In 2005, the agriculture and Christmas tree sectors generated about $453.4 million in sales and employed about 9,000 people. The Department of Community Services helps people achieve greater self-sufficiency which, for many, means returning to work. A wide range of employment services are available through the department, such as programs to gain on the job work experience, learn a trade or specialized skill, or learn to read. Since 1998-99, the number of people receiving income assistance has declined from 42,000 to about 30,000. Each year, up to 10,000 individuals participate in employment support programs. In 2005-06, the Department of Community Services helped about 3,100 income assistance recipients return to the work force. For more information or to apply for Harvest Connection, income assistance recipients should contact their local Community Services office.last_img read more

Is your town about to get a Victorian makeover

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first_imgOriginally built in 1869, and then known as Fennells Arcade, after the fishmonger and poulterers at its heart, Newport’s Market Arcade was described as a “bustling hive of activity” for over 100 years Dilapidated buildings in Lurgan, Northern Ireland Market Street in Lurgan, Northern Ireland, beforeCredit:PA Over the past four decades the Welsh town’s Market Arcade has gone into steep decline, until it is now a neglected, tatty shadow of its former thriving self Newport High Street once drew hundreds of visitors to the town In Underbanks, Stockport just over £1.8million will be spent to transform its historic high street (pictured) Over the past four decades the Welsh town’s Market Arcade has gone into steep decline, until it is now a neglected, tatty shadow of its former thriving selfCredit:Heritage Lottery Fund As shoppers gravitated towards new shopping centres and out of town retail parks they turned their back on Market Arcade Natasha Ley, of the fund, added: “We want to get people back into these area rather than leave them to decay further. We want to restore these area into somewhere that people want to live, work, visit and invest in.“As these town centres have gone into decline they have become prey to vandalism and decay and restoring the buildings will attract new investment and customers and make them safer more attractive places to visit. ”The lottery funding comes half a century after the first conservation areas were established, including Stamford in Lincolnshire. Now, the timber on Market Arcade is rotting  Dilapidated buildings in Lurgan, Northern Ireland, will be improved by the £1.9m grantCredit:PA Now, the timber on Market Arcade is rotting  Market Street in Lurgan, Northern Ireland, before But while its 600 listed buildings house a large range of independent shops and businesses and provide a draw for tourists visiting the area, others towns in areas of social and economic deprivation – such as South Wales – have suffered steep decline.Originally built in 1869, and then known as Fennells Arcade, after the fishmonger and poulterers at its heart, Newport’s Market Arcade was described as a “bustling hive of activity” for over 100 years.At its height shoppers would queue to get into the arcade, with one trader boasting that during the 1950s he would sell 3000lbs of tomatoes in a single Friday afternoon.But as shoppers gravitated towards new shopping centres and out of town retail parks they turned their back on Market Arcade.center_img The Heritage Lottery Fund is to spend £17 million to help revitalise 10 conservation areas across the UK over the next five years.Those behind the scheme say it will also help reduce crime and vandalism, as more people return to their local town centre to visit new shops and entertainment facilities.The Lottery Fund says the money will “help to reverse years of decline by repairing buildings and creating attractive, vibrant places”. In Underbanks, Stockport just over £1.8million will be spent to transform its historic high street (pictured)Credit:Heritage Lottery Fund The Heritage Lottery Fund has invested more than £288m of National Lottery money since 1994 to more than 439 projects conserving historic townscapes.Ros Kerslake, Chief Executive of the Heritage Lottery Fund, said:  “We’ve been investing money raised through the National Lottery in the UK’s conservation areas for more than 20 years and we’ve seen first-hand the incredible difference it has made to local communities.“Our work with the RSA on the Heritage Index has shown that where local communities build local plans around heritage, it can have a powerful effect not only on local pride but also on local economic prosperity.” The same will happen in Maybole in Scotland, where just under £2m will be spent to halt the deterioration of important historic buildings in the town’s conservation area.  The cash will be used to restore up to 75 properties, shopfronts and public spaces, making the town attractive for local people and investment.In Underbanks, Stockport just over £1.8million will be spent to transform its historic high street. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Darley Street in Bradford, West Yorkshire It was once Newport’s pride and joy, its shops drawing hundreds of visitors to the town, happy to spend their money on the rich variety of goods on display.But over the past four decades the Welsh town’s Market Arcade has gone into steep decline, until it is now a neglected, tatty shadow of its former thriving self.All that is about to change however, thanks to a project to restore and revive Britain’s run-down Victorian town centres. As shoppers gravitated towards new shopping centres and out of town retail parks they turned their back on Market Arcade, which is now falling apart Originally built in 1869, and then known as Fennells Arcade, after the fishmonger and poulterers at its heart, Newport’s Market Arcade was described as a “bustling hive of activity” for over 100 years Darley Street in Bradford, West Yorkshire. The area will be given £2m to help it get back to its former self Credit:Heritage Lottery FundSource/PA Newport High Street once drew hundreds of visitors to the town Much of the Grade II listed building is now in urgent need of repair, with plaster and brickwork crumbling away and ironwork left to rust.A grant of £1.2m will be used to restore the arcade’s 15 units and original architectural features to attract a new generation of independent shops and traders.last_img read more

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