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MCG pitch rated poor by ICC after dismal fourth Ashes Test

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first_imgAustralia sport Share on Twitter Share on Pinterest Read more Jason Gillespie Cricket … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. The ICC Pitch and Outfield Monitoring Process has now returned a verdict of “poor” on the Melbourne surface, after ICC match referee Ranjan Madugalle submitted a report expressing the concerns of the match officials over the performance of the wicket. Cricket Australia now have 14 days to respond.Madugalle said: “The bounce of the MCG pitch was medium, but slow in pace and got slower as the match progressed.“The nature of the pitch did not change over the five days and there was no natural deterioration. As such, the pitch did not allow an even contest between the bat and the ball as it neither favoured the batsmen too much nor it gave the bowlers sufficient opportunity to take wickets.”The England captain, Joe Root, described it as “very unresponsive” in comments which prompted MCG authorities to announce a review of preparation methods, while the Australia captain Smith was also critical, despite his second-innings century.“I don’t think it’s good for anyone,” Smith said. “I think it just needs to do something. It hasn’t changed over five days, and if we were playing for the next couple of days it probably wouldn’t have changed at all either.”The rating of the MCG pitch is the last before the ICC introduces a revised process on Thursday.Under the new guidelines, the MCG’s poor rating would have accumulated three demerit points, with any venue accumulating five points over a five-year rolling period being suspended from hosting international cricket for 12 months. Mason Crane must be given the chance to get it wrong on Ashes debut The MCG pitch used for the Boxing Day Ashes Test has been rated poor by the International Cricket Council.The heavily-criticised surface produced a dull draw, with minimal pace and bounce on offer and a lack of deterioration thwarting England’s attempts to force a first win of the series.Australia scored 327 and 263 for four declared – with Steve Smith and Mitchell Marsh comfortably batting out the last two sessions – and England making 491 in their only innings. Share on WhatsApp Australia cricket team Share via Emailcenter_img The Ashes Since you’re here… England cricket team news Share on Messenger Topics Ashes 2017-18 Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Rohingya Venezuela added to Canadas G7 international security agenda

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first_imgOTTAWA – Canada is expanding the focus of the upcoming G7 foreign ministers meeting to include the plight of Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar for Bangladesh and the democratic backslide in Venezuela.Those items are being added to the “perennial” international security issues the G7 usually confronts, such as Syria, Ukraine and Iran, Peter Boehm, Canada’s chief summit organizer, said Monday.Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland has said Canada wants to use the G7 to leverage the recommendations in the recently completed report by its special envoy Bob Rae, who called for the perpetrators of violence against the Rohingya to be brought to justice.The Rohingya issue has particular relevance because it dovetails with the summit’s theme of promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment, Freeland told a recent summit-related event at the University of Toronto.“It is very important to make the gender perspective a key part of everything that we do, and we talk about,” Freeland said.“Gender is a central part of so many of the issues that we are grappling with.”Freeland said she recently hosted a roundtable on the Rohingya violence, where she heard repeated stories of gender-based violence and rape being used as a weapon of war on women and girls fleeing Myanmar.Such chronic problems are being exacerbated by the fact that many young girls are arriving as orphans at refugee camps in Bangladesh, where they continue to be vulnerable, she said.A coalition of advocates for the Rohingya crisis — including Rae, former Liberal foreign minister Lloyd Axworthy, human rights groups and aid agencies — is calling on Canada to use its G7 presidency to highlight the crisis, which has forced 688,000 Myanmar Rohingyas, mainly women and children, into exile in neighbouring Bangladesh.Freeland said she also wants to see European voices added to the chorus of international condemnation of Venezuela’s ongoing crackdowns on dissent and democracy.Canada will be courting the support of the G7’s European members — France, Germany, Britain, Italy and the European Union — to denounced the anti-democratic behaviour of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who was barred from attending last weekend’s Summit of the Americas, she said.Venezuela is in the midst of a debilitating political and economic crisis that has hobbled the once prosperous country. Maduro is planning a widely derided presidential election that Venezuela’s opposition is boycotting.Freeland said she wants Venezuela on the G7 agenda because numerous Latin American counterparts have told here that if the EU, in particular, can be brought on board to denounce Maduro, it will help deflate the notion that anti-Venezuela sentiment is simply an American-driven phenomenon.None of that will displace the ongoing Syrian civil war as a continuing preoccupation for the G7 foreign ministers this weekend, or for its leaders when they gather in June in Quebec’s Charlevoix region, Boehm said.In a statement Monday, the G7 leaders denounced the use of chemical weapons earlier this month in Syria’s Eastern Ghouta region, and pledged support for the airstrikes Friday by the U.S., France and Britain that targeted Syria’s chemical weapons capability.“The repeated and morally reprehensible use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime in the past has been confirmed by independent international investigators. We condemn this deliberate strategy of terrorizing local populations and forcing them into submission,” said the G7 leaders.Freeland and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale are hosting their G7 counterparts for three days of meetings in Toronto next week.Boehm says Goodale and his counterparts will be focusing on cybersecurity and on how to deal with foreign fighters returning from Middle East battlefields in the ongoing war with Islamic militants.last_img read more

Time did not heal Slain Saskatchewan Cree mans mother still looks for

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first_imgStephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press REGINA — Debbie Baptiste says she was hopeful when she went into the trial of the man accused of killing her son. Hopeful that she would find justice for Colten Boushie, a 22-year-old Cree man who was shot and killed on a farm near Biggar, Sask., in August 2016.But after two weeks in court and 13 hours of jury deliberation, she left angry.Farmer Gerald Stanley, who admitted he fired the gun on the day her son died, was found not guilty of second-degree murder. He walked away a free man.“I just have to keep living a nightmare over and over again,” Baptiste said in an interview this week.“It doesn’t get better. Time did not heal.”Saturday marks the one-year anniversary of the controversial, high-profile verdict in the Stanley trial. A pipe ceremony and candlelight vigil are planned in North Battleford, Sask., and Boushie’s family members are expected to share their thoughts about the last year.Stanley took the stand at his trial and testified that his gun had gone off accidentally. He said he was firing to scare off some young people he thought were stealing from him after they drove onto his property.Boushie was sitting in the driver’s seat of a Ford Escape when he was shot in the back of the head.Public reaction to the acquittal was immediate and intense.While some rural property owners, fed up with high crime rates, saw justice in the verdict, social media also lit up with rage and grief.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tweeted that he empathized with the pain felt by Boushie’s family. Jody Wilson-Raybould, federal justice minister at the time, pledged that Canada “can and must do better.”The next day, rallies were held from coast to coast. A protest camp quietly set up on the lawn of the Saskatchewan legislature and stayed there for more than six months.Within two months of the verdict, the federal government brought forward legislation that proposes to abolish peremptory challenges, which allow lawyers to reject potential jurors without having to provide a reason.Such challenges were criticized during the Stanley trial for allowing the defence to exclude visibly Indigenous people during jury selection. “If they go through, these are probably the most fundamental changes to the jury system that I’ve seen in 30 years of teaching criminal justice,” said Kent Roach, a law professor at the University of Toronto.“Just like the case was extremely polarizing for the public, it’s also been very polarizing for the legal community.”Roach, who recently published a book about the Stanley case and its racial and historical context, said the trial received worldwide media attention because of the push by Boushie’s family for change.“They’ve had to grieve in public,” said family lawyer Eleanore Sunchild.Roach believes there ought to have been a coroner’s inquest into Boushie’s death. It could have examined what happened against the backdrop of racism, rural crime, policing and treaties, he said.“What I fear is that we will continue to have polarized opinions about this case and that, with the exception of these controversial Criminal Code amendments, it may actually fade into history as just … another example of where Canadian justice has failed Indigenous people.”One year after the acquittal, Baptiste has lost hope she will ever have justice for her son, but is still looking for “change in the justice system — that we have equal rights in that courtroom.”She wants a public inquiry.The provincial government, saying the trial laid bare the facts of the case, has rejected that.Saskatchewan Justice Minister Don Morgan who, along with Premier Scott Moe, met with Boushie’s family after the verdict, said the province wants to expand restorative justice and culturally sensitive programs.“We should never forget the tragic death of Colten Boushie and how it changed the lives of two Saskatchewan families forever,” Morgan said in a statement.Alvin Baptiste, Colten’s uncle, wants a law firm established that would be devoted to helping Indigenous people through the justice system. He also wants a museum in North Battleford to teach people about First Nations history in the region.Beside seeing more Indigenous peoples on juries, Debbie Baptiste wants more Aboriginal judges and Crown prosecutors. Of the 88 judges currently serving in Saskatchewan, four have self-declared as Indigenous.But no matter what changes may come, Baptiste knows she faces one unending reality.“I still miss my son,” she said.“That will never change.”last_img read more

What is happening to Tim Hortons

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first_imgIn today’s Big Story podcast, Tim Hortons has been the most Canadian coffee shop for so long, it’s not a stretch to call it part of our national identity. They had done such a good job of positioning themselves as the “average Canadian” coffee and donut shop, people who never went there sometimes even felt a little guilty about that decision. But then came the chilli, and the chicken strips, and the artisan-style grilled cheese. Now Tim Hortons is opening their very own innovation café– and it’s unlike any Tim Hortons you’ve ever been to.So what, exactly, is the plan here? Why has the company spent so much time recently focusing on offering things that aren’t their core products? What has become of the Tim Hortons that was mythologized in so many commercials between hockey games?You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify.You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.last_img read more

Russell Westbrook For MVP Whatever That Means

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The NBA MVP derby was once a two-man race between James Harden of the Houston Rockets and Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors.Not anymore.After recording his fourth straight triple-double on Wednesday night with a ridiculous stat line of 49 points, 16 rebounds and 10 assists, Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook is undeniably an MVP contender.Westbrook’s recent output has been mind-blowing: He’s averaging 37 points, 13.5 rebounds and 10.5 assists per game during his triple-double streak, which began as he was closing out one of the best statistical months in NBA history. As ESPN’s Stats and Info group noted, Westbrook’s performance in February (31.2 PPG/10.3 APG/9.1 RPG) was just the second time an NBA player ever averaged 30 points, 9 rebounds and 10 assists per game over a calendar month.1Minimum 10 games played in the month. (The first — and, until recently, only — player to do it was inner-circle Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson.)But there are barriers to Westbrook’s MVP candidacy. Algorithms based on previous MVP voting trends still consider him a long shot for the award, with Basketball-Reference.com’s MVP tracker assigning Westbrook a mere 6.6 percent probability of winning. By contrast, the tracker says it’s about 66 percent likely that either Curry or Harden takes home the hardware.The key determinant there: Oklahoma City’s record. Both Curry’s and Harden’s teams have won in excess of two-thirds of their games — good for the first- and fourth-ranked records in the Western Conference, respectively — while Westbrook’s Thunder have a winning percentage of 55.7 percent and are clinging to the eighth (and final) playoff spot in the West. Fair or not, team performance has historically mattered to MVP voters. (Although Westbrook will likely get bonus points for keeping the Thunder afloat in the playoff race during spells in which defending MVP Kevin Durant was injured.)Plus there’s the question of where Westbrook ranks statistically, even after his recent streak of brilliance. Single-season Real Plus-Minus (RPM), Value Over Replacement Player (VORP) and Win Shares all have Harden and Curry ranked No. 1 and 2 in terms of value produced this season. So if things hold steady over the next six weeks, Westbrook will have to overcome both the stats and historical patterns of MVP voting if he is to win the award. It’s been done before, but not all that often.Then again, what does “Most Valuable” even mean? It’s a debate that comes up every year, in every sport, and it never ends with a satisfactory answer. The great sportswriter Joe Posnanski put it best in a podcast last fall:I love [the MVP] because it makes us argue about the word ‘valuable.’ … When somebody named the MVP award, you know in their mind they just had: ‘Best Player.’ The best player ought to get an award, and what are you going to call it? Just call it the ‘Most Valuable Player’ award. OK, great.And ever since then, we have been parsing that word to absolute death. I think my favorite argument against somebody winning the MVP award is when they say, ‘Look, it’s not the Player of the Year Award or the Most Outstanding Player — it’s the Most Valuable Player.’ Like there is any difference between any of those things. You’re just pulling synonyms out.I love that, and in a way, I would never want that to change because it brings up such extraordinarily stupid arguments that just rage on and on every year.And this year’s NBA race brings a particularly interesting twist. According to long-term predictive RPM, which is the best single-number assessment of a player’s current talent level,2In the sense that it best predicts out-of-sample lineup results. the best player in the league is still probably Cleveland’s LeBron James — as he has been for the past three seasons running.James was so far out in front of his peers a few seasons ago that he could afford a relative down year (by his standards). But therein lies the problem — the game’s best player hasn’t quite played like it this season. By just about any metric, Harden, Curry and Westbrook have been better than James in 2014-15.This kind of thing happens all the time in baseball, where performance fluctuates wildly around true talent. (Or did anyone really think Ken Caminiti was the best player in a league that featured Barry Bonds in his prime?) But basketball is supposed to be different — in the absence of voter fatigue, there’s a lot of crossover between MVP and “best player” in the NBA, to the point that the former can circle back to become a referendum on the latter.So do you still give the 2014-15 MVP to the best player? OK, then give it to James. Or do you honor the player who has had the best season? Then you have to decide between Harden and Curry. Or maybe you just eschew the whole process and give it to Westbrook — if not the Most Valuable, possibly the Most Electrifying Player in the NBA right now. read more

ButlerTurner staying Independent PLP has other plans for Long Island

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first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas, February 7, 2017 – Pure ‘bull crap’ is how Loretta Butler Turner describes talk that she is returning to the party of her Grandfather and the tone from the PLP camp is pretty much the same.   National Chairman, Bradley Roberts said Thursday will be a defining day for the Progressive Liberal Party as five seats will see their candidates ratified including Long Island, where Butler-Turner says she will run as an independent.Attorney Glendon Rolle, is expected to be approved as the PLPs standard bearer for Long Island.  Meanwhile the Free National Movement Leader, Hubert Minnis is reportedly planning to grab back three of the MPs who turned on him to put Loretta Butler Turner in the drivers’ seat as Opposition Leader.A report names Neko Grant, Richard Lightbourne and Andre Rollins as departing the Long Island MPs side due to conflicts, reportedly in her Senate appointments.   The Free National Movement has been aiming to reclaim spotlight as a viable option with announcements that it has a plan for National Health Insurance and about the Party’s Manifesto, which was actually released last week.#MagneticMediaNews ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Recommended for you The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

City looking to accommodate homeless population who live in their cars

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first_img March 14, 2019 Posted: March 14, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsMISSION BEACH (KUSI) – City Council will soon decide how to accommodate the homeless population that lives in their cars. There’s over 14 million dollars from the State Homeless Emergency Aid Program (HEAP) Grant and in Mayor Falconer’s outline, there is an amount set aside to expand overnight safe parking.KUSI’s John Soderman has more on this story. KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter City looking to accommodate homeless population who live in their carslast_img read more

Army Issues RFP for Ft Campbell Solar Project

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first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Army last week released a request for proposals for a 3.1-megawatt solar array at Fort Campbell, Ky.The Army intends to procure a 27-year power purchase agreement (PPA) for the array through the renewable energy multiple award task order contract small business solar pool. That acquisition will be combined with a 10-year utility energy services contract with Pennyrile Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation, according to a press release from the Army Corps of Engineers, Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville.Pennyrile will construct a 1.9-megawatt project, providing the post with a combined 5-megawatt solar array. The cooperative is using a $3 million grant from the commonwealth of Kentucky to supplement the cost of building its portion of the array. This is the first time the Huntsville Center’s energy division will use two third-party financing contract vehicles together for a renewable energy project, according to the release.In 2014, Fort Campbell received approval for an $800,000 federal energy management program AFFECT grant from the Energy Department that will be awarded to the developer selected for the PPA. The developer can use the funds to pay down the capital investment for the 3.1-megawatt array.The installation has identified 25 acres of land formerly used as a landfill for the photovoltaic array. The contractor will finance, design, build, operate, own and maintain the renewable energy generation facility on land leased from the Army.“We’re excited to finally get this project moving,” said Jim Duttweiler, Fort Campbell’s director of public works. “When complete, this project will provide more than 10 percent of Fort Campbell’s power requirements in the form of renewable energy and move us toward energy security and independence.” last_img read more

Ohio Lawmakers Approve 5M for Military Facilities Commission

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Sprint adds Samsungs Galaxy S10 5G to its nextgen lineup

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