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Major Rager Augusta To Host George Clinton & P-Funk, James Brown Band, & Taz

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first_imgThe Major Rager has been going down for five years in Augusta, Georgia, coinciding with the kickoff of the annual Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Course every April—the first Major Championship each summer. Today, The Major Rager Augusta announced its lineup for this year, with scheduled performances by George Clinton & Parliament-Funkadelic and the James Brown Band featuring a number of special guests on Friday, April 6th, 2018. In 2018, the event has also invited the young guitar prodigy Brandon “Taz” Niederauer to serve as artist-at-large.The Major Rager Brings The Flaming Lips, Moon Taxi, & Eric Krasno Band To The Green [Videos]Tickets are available on Friday, January 12th at 10 a.m. (EST) at TheMajorRager.com & FWBpro.com. With a tiered ticketing system, early-bird pricing expires on Friday, January 25th, at 10 a.m., so make sure to snag your tickets quickly before they rise in pricing. Furthermore, in keeping with the golf theme of the event, The Major Rager will also be offering “FORE!” packs, which allow attendees to buy a four-pack of tickets at a discounted price. Plus, in addition to these main performances at Augusta Common in downtown Augusta, GA, the event will also host Everyone Orchestra for an official late-night afterparty.last_img read more

Meet the New XPS 13: Stylish, Powerful and Better by Every Measure

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first_imgTechnology has become an expression of style for those who use it – though fashion can be fickle. One thing we do know is elegance never goes out of style.First unveiled at CES 2012, the XPS 13 immediately enhanced the legacy of XPS as the world’s most celebrated laptop and winner of more product awards than any other line in Dell’s history, most recently named a CES 2018 Innovation Award Honoree.And how did it garner this latest honor? Vision and a lot of hard work.In reimagining the XPS 13, Dell took inspiration from the realm of fashion, where rose gold remains a trending color and white accents have been growing in popularity, seen everywhere from watch bands to sneakers. However, when turning our XPS white, we strived to achieve elegance and invested more than a dozen people, 11,520 hours and 50 trials to create a new system that was as stunning inside and out. The Dell design team didn’t want to simply paint a system white – they wanted to use authentic materials and make sure the system looked as beautiful on day 1,000 as it does on day 1.With the desire to give its white palm rest a weaved appearance, the team considered different materials beyond the color limits of traditional carbon fiber. The solution? An innovative new crystalline silica material with the white color literally woven in, like a fabric, in nine composite layers.  Dell is the first to use this woven glass fiber in a laptop.“An innovative new crystalline silica material with the white color literally woven in, like a fabric, in nine composite layers.ShareComplementing the new rose gold aluminum shell of the XPS 13, the alpine white glass fiber weave is elegant to the eye and silky to the touch. Durable as it is beautiful, atop its soft-textured lattice is titanium oxide for a pearlescent sheen and UV and stain-resistant coatings to prevent yellowing or staining over time. In fact, if you get a pen mark or other stain on the white interior you can just wipe it off. And with a heat resistance superior to metal, woven glass fiber also stays cooler to facilitate longer performance.Interesting fact: The glass fibers in one palm rest, if laid end to end, would extend for 117,500 miles, nearly enough to stretch halfway from Earth to the moon. Now that’s one giant leap.We not only worked to create the most beautiful laptop on the market, but extended that design ethos to its matching white power cords and USB-A/USB-C adapter. And moving from style, to lifestyle, we invested in sustainable recycled ocean plastics and bamboo packaging so you can purchase with confidence knowing that Dell is doing its part to help the planet.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XChLUIP8kDw&feature=youtu.beBesides its head-turning exterior, the all-new XPS 13 is better by every measure. Now, even more portable as the smallest 13-inch laptop on the planet, its stunning InfinityEdge display fits this 13-inch laptop in an 11-inch frame. It’s a full 30 percent (3.4mm) thinner as well as lighter, starting at just 2.7 pounds, making the XPS 13 the ultimate in mobility and durability.Running Windows 10 and powered by the latest Intel 8th Generation Quad Core processor, XPS 13 delivers superior mobile performance with fast booting SSDs up to 1TB. You can also expect the longest battery life of any 13-inch laptop, with almost 20 hours on FHD, up to 11 on UHD (Mobile Mark 14).While we made the system smaller and lighter, we were able to increase the performance by 2x, over the previous XPS 13 launched in 2015, and maintain the world’s most powerful 13-inch laptop in its class. So how did we do that? We have the most innovative performance and thermal engineering at Dell.“…we were able to increase the performance by 2x, over the previous XPS 13 launched in 2015, and maintain the world’s most powerful 13-inch laptop in its class.ShareWe developed Dell Power Manager to let you customize your balance of battery life, charging, thermals and acoustics and Dynamic Power Mode that intuitively delivers maximum power as needed, for such tasks as video rendering applications and advanced spreadsheets, while intelligently monitoring and managing system temperatures. This means the XPS 13 has sustained high performance while competitors performance declines with continued use, making the XPS 13 the most powerful 13-inch in its class (Tested by Principled Technologies in December 2017 using the Cinebench CPU (multi-core test)).As for thermal engineering, XPS 13 is the world’s first laptop built with GORE™ Thermal Insulation, the same silica aerogels that have been used in high-tech science and extreme engineering environments to diffuse and dissipate heat, such as insulation on the Mars Rovers and Hyper Velocity Particle capture in the Stardust Probe. This material directs heat out of the device, keeping your system cool while it works hard.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIHVfZX9tXANow with a higher resolution display, incorporating 2.5 million more pixels with 4K Ultra HD compared to the previous QHD+, the 100 percent sRGB display on the XPS 13 gives you great, saturated and accurate color, whether for graphic professionals or watching your favorite Netflix show. In fact, Dell knows people today use their PCs to stream content, so the XPS 13 also delivers an unparalleled immersive cinematic experience with richer colors and details, crisper and stronger audio, and reduced buffering, so you really can watch Netflix and chill.Activated by voice, touch or facial recognition, access to the new XPS 13 comes through a triad of biometric doorways. Log in with a look or a touch with the infrared camera and optional fingerprint reader in the power button for Windows Hello, or talk to your device from across the room, with four integrated digital microphones and Microsoft’s Cortana voice recognition capabilities.The new XPS 13 is available globally beginning today on Dell.com, Microsoft.com and at your local Microsoft Store, starting at $999.99. Dell is also offering an Ubuntu-based developer edition with Linux preloaded starting at $949.99 beginning today on Dell.com in the US, Canada and Europe as well.I can confidently say the new XPS 13 is the most stunning system we have ever created with the perfect blend of elegance and performance. If you are attending CES, please come check it out at the #DellExperience at the Yardbird in the Venetian or give me your feedback at @AzorFrank.The XPS 13 is just the first of many exciting announcements we will be making at CES 2018. Stay up to date on the latest Dell news by visiting our CES press site here throughout the duration of the show.last_img read more

Race Ahead: Mad Mountain Mud Run

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first_imgMad Mountain Mud RunSaturday, May 31, 2014Berkeley Park, Hendersonville, NCThe Mad Mountain Mud Run is an obstacle course race and family festival, held in Hendersonville’s Berkeley Park and surrounding forests. Come for the mud race, stay for the festival — full of live music, games, food and craft beer.The course is approximately three miles and all ability levels are encouraged to enter in one of three categories.Start Time: All participants can expect to begin between 12:45 p.m. and 4:30 and the event ends at 7 p.m.Cost: $200/teamsponsored-event-1Visit MadMountainMudRun.com for all the information you’ll need to spectate or participate!MMMR2Family members, friends and others are invited for the day to cheer on their muddy loved ones and enjoy a festival atmosphere with food, beverages, and live music. No pets will be allowed at this event.The event will proceed unless under extremely bad weather conditions and yes, prizes will be awarded!All Mad Mountain Mud Run proceeds benefit Hendersonville’s non-profit children’s museum, “Hands On! A Child’s Gallery.”The Mad Mountain Mud Run welcomes racers and friends from all of western North Carolina, upstate South Carolina, and beyond. Our Hendersonville NC location is about 15 miles south of Asheville, NC and 30 miles north of Greenville, SC. We are also an easy drive from Charlotte, NC and eastern Tennessee.Race Contact: Heather Boeke; [email protected]; (828) 697-8333Contact Beth Bockoven at [email protected] if you would like more information on volunteering.MMMR_4c_logolast_img read more

What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida

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first_img August 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida What can candidates say? Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee says USSC decision means little for Florida Associate EditorWhen Florida’s newest justice, Raoul Cantero III, was introduced by the governor at a news conference on the Capitol steps, a reporter asked whether he opposes the death penalty.“I have no views,” Justice Cantero replied.That many judges and judicial candidates — from county court to the state’s highest court — are reluctant to express views on controversial and political issues is playing it safe with the Code of Judicial Conduct designed to protect the impartiality of the judiciary.But there’s a new wave of debate rippling through Florida about whether the lips of judges or judicial candidates must be sealed on such hot issues after all. That debate was recharged June 27, when the United States Supreme Court, in a 5-4 ruling, found that Minnesota’s canon prohibiting judicial candidates from announcing their views on disputed legal and political issues violates the First Amendment ( Republican Party of Minnesota v. White ).What impact will that ruling have on Florida’s judicial elections?That depends on whom you ask.Ask the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee, chaired by Dade County Judge Jeffrey D. Swartz, and the answer is a resounding: no impact in Florida.In an explanation of the ruling mailed to every judicial candidate and challenged incumbent judge in Florida, Swartz highlighted in bold print that White “has no impact on the statutory or code provisions which regulate judicial elections in Florida.”While the distinction is clear-cut in his mind, Swartz said there has been a lot of confusion out there in the real world of judicial campaigning.“We have been inundated as a committee since White with a number of requests for opinions that clearly indicate there are a number of judicial candidates — and incumbent judges, too — that we believe don’t understand the impact, or lack thereof, of White, ” Judge Swartz said. “That’s why we sent a copy of our opinion to everyone up for election. And it says in bold, ‘In Florida, nothing has changed.’ We have a couple who like to argue a different position. We tell them we’re just an advisory board. We’re not an enforcement board.”But others predict looser lips, pumped-up politics, and on the plus side, greater information for voters who often complain they don’t know enough about judicial candidates to cast meaningful ballots.“Though Florida’s Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee issued a statement saying the Minnesota decision means nothing here, hardly anybody else believes that,” wrote St. Petersburg Times columnist Martin Dyckman. “And, of course, the interest groups will be firing up their candidate questionnaires.”The Christian Coalition of Florida, for one, welcomes the opportunity to better size up judicial candidates, saying the top question they receive from their members is: “Where do judges stand on the issues?”American Bar President Robert E. Hirshon warned the ruling “will open a Pandora’s box. We will now have judicial candidates running for office by announcing their positions on particular issues, knowing that voters will evaluate their performance in office on how closely their rulings comport with those positions. It is not the type of justice system the American people want.”At least one Judicial Qualifications Commission case — regarding Escambia County Judge Patricia Kinsey’s challenge to paying a proposed $50,000 fine for alleged improper campaign speech against an incumbent judge — is pending before the Florida Supreme Court (case no. SC96629) and will pause for the filing of briefs to address the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in White. But in explaining the Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee’s “no-impact” stance, Judge Swartz stresses the distinction that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision is “very narrow and expressly limited to the ‘announce clause’” — which was removed from Florida’s Code of Judicial Conduct in 1994.Like Minnesota, Florida’s current judicial code does, however, include a “pledges or promises clause,” which separately prohibits judicial candidates from making pledges or promises of conduct in office other than the faithful and impartial performance of the duties of the office — and the U.S. Supreme Court specifically noted that prohibition was not challenged in White, and therefore the court expressed no view.What’s the difference, practically speaking, on the judicial campaign trail? In an interview, Judge Swartz acknowledged the difference is “very subtle.”“A promise or a pledge would be: ‘Every person who commits first-degree murder goes to the electric chair.’“Then you take a look at a judge in a nonpartisan setting who says, ‘I believe the death penalty is appropriate, and in appropriate cases should be applied to serve as a deterrent.’ Those are announcements of positions of political and controversial issues and come short of a pledge or promise,” Judge Swartz explained.Because Florida does not have the announcement clause, Judge Swartz said, judges are able to state positions in general, as long as it is not done in a partisan setting.“Don’t go to a gathering of the Republican Party and say you are against abortion, because you know that will get you votes,” Swartz said. “Don’t say at the Democratic Party event that you are against school vouchers. That would be deemed to seek partisan support.”But it would be okay, Swartz said, for a judicial candidate to address a group of senior citizens at a condo meeting and express opinions about Social Security issues or health care for the elderly.Special interest groups may be able to get judicial candidates to tell them their personal views on abortion, Swartz said, but that candidate “cannot say, ‘I will do everything I can to impede Roe v. Wade. ’”At Florida State University College of Law, visiting Assistant Professor Howard Wasserman, who specializes in First Amendment law, said the White case “certainly will inject more politics into judicial elections.”What Wasserman found most interesting was Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s concurring opinion, in which she took the opportunity to blast the process of electing judges, sometimes rife with million-dollar-plus campaign contributions, in practice in 39 states, including Florida.“If the state has a problem with judicial impartiality, it is largely one the state has brought upon itself by continuing the practice of popularly electing judges,” O’Connor wrote.“An undercurrent of the opinion is that if you take this step and allow judges to be elected by the political process, you are stuck with a robust, wide-open, and uninhibited debate on public issues,” Wasserman said.“If you want to elect judges, fine. But we’ve got this thing called the First Amendment. It will give you headaches, but you are stuck with it. That’s the bottom line. And the gloves are going to come off.”Speaking as an individual judge, not as chair of the committee, Swartz said, “I can tell you that politicalization of the judiciary is something that has been happening. It just started a short time ago, and it is more pronounced.“I think that certain legal issues and political issues have divided us and polarized us to the extent that both sides of issues are demanding answers that border on the pledge or promise they are not allowed to get,” Swartz said.“Some parties, organizations, and groups of people would like to see us do away with a nonpartisan judiciary. These are the kinds of things that are a real attack on the independence of the third branch of government. It’s very disconcerting.”The nation’s highest court was divided on how far judicial candidates should go in expressing their views, with the goal of balancing free speech rights with maintaining an impartial and open-minded judiciary.“The notion that the special context of electioneering justifies an abridgment of the right to speak out on disputed issues sets our First Amendment jurisprudence on its head.. . . We have never allowed the government to prohibit candidates from communicating relevant information to voters during an election,” Justice Antonin Scalia write in the majority opinion.But in her dissent, Justice Ruth Ginsberg made a sharp distinction between candidates for the judiciary and for the other branches of government, because judges must be concerned with the due process rights of litigants.“When a judicial candidate promises to rule a certain way on an issue that may later reach the courts, the potential for due process violations is grave and manifest,” Ginsberg wrote. And she argued the “announce clause” and “pledge or promises clause” are not so conveniently separated.“The constitutionality of the pledges or promises clause is thus amply supported; the provision not only advances due process of law for litigants in Minnesota courts, it also reinforces the authority of the Minnesota judiciary by promoting public confidence in the state’s judges. The announce clause, however, is equally vital to achieving these compelling ends, for without it, the pledges or promises provision would be feeble, an arid form, a matter of no real importance,” Ginsberg wrote.In Florida, the “announce clause” went by the wayside, sparked by a 1990 ruling from U.S. District Judge William Stafford, of the Northern District of Florida, who sided with the American Civil Liberties Union in giving judicial candidates greater latitude in discussing disputed legal or political issues.“A person does not surrender his constitutional right to freedom of speech when he becomes a candidate for judicial office. A state cannot require so much,” Judge Stafford said at the time. “Indeed, when a state decides that its trial judges are to be popularly elected, as Florida has done, it must recognize the candidates’ right to make campaign speeches and the concomitant right of the public to be informed about judicial candidates.”In the current JQC case, Roy Kinsey, Jr., on behalf of his wife, Judge Patricia Kinsey, told the Florida Supreme Court in an order to show cause: “This may be an appropriate time for this court to issue the ‘narrowing construction’ called for by Judge Stafford in his order granting plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment following the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals’ remand of American Civil Liberties Union v. The Florida Bar, 999 F.2d 1486 (11th Cir. 1993), and provide future candidates easily understood guidelines that will permit them to fully discuss issues relevant to the office they seek without fear of violating the Canons.”What political views are okay for judicial candidates to express?Professor Wasserman notes that in White, Minnesota’s code of conduct provided an approved list of topics to inquire of judicial candidates, such as cameras in the courtroom, how minorities and women are treated in the court system, and how a judge might reduce case loads.While not “hot-button” political issues — like the death penalty or abortion rights — Wasserman said, they still contain political ramifications, nonetheless. And the argument can be made that voters have a right to seek and gather information about candidates — judicial or not.“If we have to make judges open to popular elections, then the gloves come off. Do we hope judges behave with slightly better comportment than candidates in the political branch? We hope they do. Does it hurt judicial independence? No more than popular elections, in and of itself,” Wasserman said.Judge Swartz concluded that freedom of speech could end up tying judges’ hands in the courtroom, because expressing their views makes judges vulnerable for removal on certain types of cases that come before them. For example, a judge who has proclaimed he is against abortion, would likely be asked to recuse himself on all cases about abortion rights.“All a candidate can tell you is: ‘I love the law. I believe in the law. Are there things I don’t like about the law? Yes, but as a judge, it’s my job to enforce the law the way it’s written, and that’s what I am going to do,’” Swartz said.“Asking judges to do more is committing them to a course of action they cannot carry out.”Bottom line: No matter what the Supreme Court says about free speech, lawyers will still be able to ask to disqualify a biased judge.last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Friday, July 19

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first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionGroup hopes to spark interest in baseballAs president of the Schenectady Ole Timers Baseball Club (SOTBC), I would like to bring to everyone’s attention a very positive activity happening this August designed to reignite interest in youth baseball in Schenectady. SOTBC was founded in 1992 and today has more than 160 members. While we are primarily a social club, we have undertaken a major project designed to encourage the city’s 7- to 12-year-olds to discover the joy of playing baseball. This August, and for each of the next four years, SOTBC is teaming with the city of Schenectady and several prominent local businesses to present a free baseball skills camp. This year’s event is scheduled for Aug. 12 and 13. Schenectady’s Alex Jurczynski, an assistant baseball coach at Princeton University, will serve as camp director. Mayor Gary McCarthy and City Councilman Vince Riggi have cleared the way to make sure the best baseball field in Schenectady, the Buck Ewing “A” Diamond in Central Park, is ready to host the event. An all-star lineup of local businesses has stepped to the plate with sponsor scholarships to ensure the camp is free to all.In addition, these scholarships will cover a portion of each participant’s registration fee for Schenectady Little League or Schenectady Babe Ruth League the following year. Among the major sponsors are SOTBC, Glenville Queen Diner, LTs Grill, OrthoNY, the Schenectady PBA, Paul Moore, CapCom Credit Union and Martin, Harding and Mazzotti.We welcome you to stop by Central Park to watch our future “major leaguers.”Don BlahaNiskayunaRather than shout, get a bicycle bellThis letter is concerning bike trail etiquette, specifically for cyclist passing fellow trail users.I believe it’s time to end the archaic practice of approaching stealthily behind a person or family, getting about 10 feet behind them and shouting, “On your left.”This results in people being shocked out of their meandering bliss, and becoming somewhat stunned, and in that moment forgetting their right from their left. My immediate response to them, as they pass by me, is telling them to “get a bell.”Perhaps bells should be mandatory. I find that at about 50 to 75 yards away, a person with average hearing will respond by moving slightly right and will acknowledge that they know you are coming.There are a lot of walkers, runners and families with small children and dogs who don’t hear a cyclist coming up behind them until they’re right on their heels. I think a pleasant ringing of a bell, rather than a startling shout, would be much more appreciated. So for all the bike trail cyclists out there, please consider getting a bell for your bicycles.Michael WernerRotterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img read more