Health skills scheme could turn porters into consultants

Health skills scheme could turn porters into consultants

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first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Health skills scheme could turn porters into consultantsOn 30 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Aporter working in the NHS could ultimately progress to become a consultant ifplans to tackle skills shortages and transform HR practices in the healthservice become a reality.Thiswas the view of Andrew Foster, the NHS Confederation’s policy director forhuman resources, who outlined proposals at the Anuman 2001 conference to try toovercome chronic skills shortages .Fostersaid proposals to recruit an additional 36,000 new NHS staff are part of the 30per cent rise in NHS spending over the next four years announced by HealthSecretary Alan Milburn.Buthe stressed that it is difficult to recruit all the extra staff needed in theshort term because of the lengthy training involved.Fostersaid one way to solve this problem is through using a skills escalator, whichwould enable all staff to receive the necessary training so they can take onnew roles.KeithJohnston, HR director for the North Bristol NHS Trust, said, “It might bethat porter to consultant is impossible but there are pathways at the momentwhere a porter can become a healthcare assistant and through vocationalqualifications train as a nurse and then as a nurse consultant or nursedirector.” Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Integration: the key to recruiting on the Web

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Onlinerecruitment sites are used by HR managers everywhere on a daily basis. But arethey being fully embraced by the department and integrated as fully as theycould be? Ifthe answer’s no, it may be because they are not being managed properly. i-GRaspis an online recruitment management systems company that aims to ensure jobapplications – whether online, direct to the recruiters or from an employmentagency – can be tracked and managed online to streamline the process further.Managing director Andy Randall explains why such systems can make a difference.By Sue WeekesPT:Online recruitment systems on their own can significantly cut recruitingcosts and timescales. What difference will a management system make to the HRdepartment?PH:It lets them keep the human touch and takes away the administration. A lot ofrecruiters are heavily loaded and such a system should let recruitment shed itsdata-entry image and bring new challenges for them that should make their workmore interesting and make fuller use of their abilities.Recruitingbecomes a more collaborative process. If a line manager calls up an HR managerto ask what stage they are at with a particular application, they can bothaccess details on the system and have an intelligent discussion about it. Ithelps to promote a feeling of working together. Companies aren’t groups ofislands anymore. You can be a virtual team – HR manager in one office, linemanager in another office in London and candidate in Edinburgh, for instance –but they can all meet together via a single system.PT:What problems have you had to overcome installing online recruitment systems?PHProblems arise when people sell a vision and customers believe that once theyhave a job site on the Web, all they have to do is switch a button and awaythey go. It must be implemented properly, often with a programme of changemanagement at the same time. If not, reactionary factors can arise, such as HRstaff fearing for their jobs and line managers not wanting the new responsibilitythat an involvement in recruitment brings. We like clients to already bethinking about how the system will change their organisation before they cometo us.PT:So how should senior management and HR departments prepare?PH:They must be committed to the success of it and be prepared to commit resourcesto it, in terms of the right solution and the right staff. They have to bevisionary and have to have a project sponsor or champion, who could be the headof HR or recruitment. They need to prepare for both organisational and processchange. Some companies put together a dedicated e-enablement project managementteam where the key people could come from HR, and maybe some from IT.PT:How do you see online recruitment systems working over the next few years?PH:We will see development of communities working at several levels. First of all,HR professionals and recruiters need to look at their own intranet in terms ofhow staff use it and how they deploy their range of vacancies on it. Next, theyshould develop alumni networks, rather like college websites do forex-students. Atthe moment this is a very underdeveloped area on corporate sites, but if thereis a corner of the website dedicated to alumni, ex-employees can keep anassociation with the company and may one day return if they’re kept in touch.At the moment, the referral section we have on our system is a midway point tothis, where people can recommend friends and ex-colleagues for jobs. Thereshould also be an aspirational part of the site, where people who areinterested in working for the company or brand can visit.PT:How do you see companies approaching recruitment over the next few years?PH:Printed media will remain important, but recruitment adverts will work moregenerically, driving people to the corporate website. Recruiters and HRprofessionals need a multi-pronged attack when it comes to their recruitmentstrategy: their system should be integrated with the employment agencies’integrated with their website and corporate intranet and integrated with theirinternal people. These three areas are vital and they shouldn’t do any of themin isolation.www.i-GRasp.com Integration: the key to recruiting on the WebOn 18 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Force bids to attract more women and ethnic groups

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first_imgWarwickshire Police Force has launched a recruitment drive aimed atincreasing its representation of ethnic minorities and women in the force. The six-week recruitment campaign, which began in June, aims to attract 102 policeofficers by the end of March 2002, compared with 92 last year. The aim of the recruitment drive is to boost representation of ethnicminorities and women in the force, explained Julie Middleton, the force’srecruitment manager. Warwickshire Police has established community focus groups consisting ofstudents and older people from ethnic minorities, to give the force a betterunderstanding for community concerns, explained Middleton. Warwickshire Police has also appointed a minority ethnic community liaisonofficer to explain the diversity of roles available to the community. Ethnic minorities account for 2.8 per cent of the force, which WarwickshirePolice plans to raise to 3.5 per cent by 2004. Women are also severelyunder-represented, accounting for 16 per cent of police officers, compared tothe national average of 25 per cent. Middleton said, “So far, we have received 30 applications from ethnicminorities and 84 applications from women. The aim of this recruitment drive isto get Warwickshire Police to be a preferred employer for these groups.” Warwickshire Police has appointed a female police officer to address theshortage of women in the force, by offering advice and coaching to femalerecruits. The force is also trying to tackle another barrier facing female recruits –a high number of women failing the fitness test. Middleton said, “We havedecided to run coaching sessions to help women get up to the right level offitness.” www.warwickshire.police.ukBy Karen Higginbottom Previous Article Next Article Force bids to attract more women and ethnic groupsOn 19 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Briefing

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first_img Previous Article Next Article A round-up of news from the professional journalsFine exemption bid Community nurses in central London will face hefty charges every time theytravel by car unless a union campaign to win them exemption is successful.London mayor Ken Livingstone plans to introduce a daily £5 congestion charge totravel into the centre of the capital by January 2003. But Tom Sandford, theRCN’s regional director for London, was “optimistic” nurses will winexemption. Nursing Times 18 July Death risk scoring A new scoring system for assessing a patient’s risk of death fromcardiovascular disease is available online. The system calculates an adult’srisk of death based on 11 factors, including age, sex, systolic blood pressureand total cholesterol levels, smoking, and diabetes. Nursing Times 13 July Staffing success A national staffing agency run by the NHS is benefiting nurses and managers,a conference on the progress ofNHS professionals has heard. The agency has beenpiloted since November at 15 sites, with a further 30 set to join the scheme.The service offers trusts a single point of contact for finding staff throughcollaboration between NHS employers in local labour markets. Nursing Standard 25 July BriefingOn 1 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

Sick Britain syndrome reaches epidemic level

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first_imgTaking a ‘sickie’ has passed into the language as a necessary if undesirableprop to modern living – its almost become acceptable to admit that there aredays when we feign illness just to find time to manage our private lives. It is the exposed tip of an iceberg of ambiguity and twisted thinking aboutillness, stress and incapacity at work. Despite there now being 2.7 millionpeople claiming incapacity benefit – a full two million more than 20 years ago– we don’t really believe the numbers. What we think in our hearts is that itis no more than a mass outbreak of feigned sick leave. To those on the right, it is proof that the current welfare state creates adependency culture, that people are slacking, and that the whole system needstightening up. To the leftwingers, it provides yet more evidence that we haveto improve the welfare state – people are having to pretend to be sick to getan adequate standard of living. Few take the numbers at face value; yet 3,000 people move onto incapacitybenefit every week. Either they always had a problem, or it became magnified by work. Butwhatever the reason and whatever their original state of health, they are nowgenuinely incapable. It’s a problem for everyone; for those facing the psychological and socialtrauma of accepting permanent disability; for the Government paying the benefitand for the companies who have to suffer the cost of the transition from workto incapacity benefit. Last year, work and pensions minister Andrew Smith announced a drive to cutthe rising cost of incapacity payments. A pilot scheme this year, willintroduce mandatory interviews for new claimants, provide a one-off grant tohelp the transition into work, and will include extra money for claimants whotake jobs paying less than £15,000 a year. People with more severe conditionswill be exempted. UK employers spend up to 16 per cent of their pay bill each year managingsickness absence. Up to 70 per cent of these costs are attributable tolong-term absence, which also accounts for more than 55 per cent of all workingdays lost. If sickness within organisations could be reduced, stoppinglong-term absence turning into incapacity, it would be a win-win situation forall concerned. Recent policy emphasis in the UK has been on how employers can intervene andrehabilitate sick or injured employees – taking action early enough to breakthe sequence of events leading to incapacity. For employers, this means earlyintervention, looking at work practices and environments, adjusting workconditions, and easing people back into work. But while employers recognise the argument, they are daunted by theimplementation. Both employers and the Government need to think more broadlyabout mutual support. But above all we need to open up this debate urgently andfrankly. It is emerging as one of every organisation’s – and society’s –fastest growing problems. By Will Hutton, Chief executive, The WorkFoundation          Comments are closed. Sick Britain syndrome reaches epidemic levelOn 21 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Case round up

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first_imgCase round upOn 8 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. This week’s care round-up by Eversheds 020 7919 4500Buyers beware Alamo Group (Europe) Ltd v Tucker &Twose of Tiverton Ltd, EAT, 24February 2003 The question of exactly what rights and obligations transfer on a businesssale has evolved in case law since the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection ofEmployment) Regulations 1981 (TUPE), as this case demonstrates. At a Works Council meeting in June 2000, Tucker & Twose told staff itwas in administration and consulted them over a possible management buyout. Asit transpired, however, Alamo bought the business instead and within a few daysof the sale, announced the relocation of the manufacturing operation and 34redundancies. Under TUPE, both sellers and purchasers have obligations to inform andconsult affected employees. Regulation 5(2) of TUPE also provides that on sale,all the rights, powers and obligations of the seller transfer to the purchaser.The employees brought tribunal claims seeking compensation as a result ofthe company’s failure to consult over the transfer to Alamo and the job losses,and argued that liability for this transferred to Alamo. The tribunal agreed,notwithstanding that Alamo had carried out a substantial consultation exercisebefore effecting the dismissals. Alamo appealed unsuccessfully. The EAT reiterated that the purpose of TUPEis to protect employees on a business transfer. Regulation 5 is crucial to thatprotection, and the obligations to inform and consult affected staff(Regulations 10 and 11) are also subject to Regulation 5 and transfer on sale.This is so even though the failure to consult in this case was not Alamo’sfault. The formality of informal warnings Ferenc-Batchelor and Anor v London Underground Ltd, EAT, 29 October 2002Workers now have the right to be accompanied at a disciplinary hearing whichis defined (by section 13(4) of the Employment Relations Act 1999) as “ahearing which could result in the administration of a formal warning, theconfirmation of a warning, or the taking of some other action”. But what about less formal situations? In these conjoined cases, theapplicants received ‘informal’ oral warnings in accordance with London Underground’s(LU) disciplinary procedure but were not offered the chance to be accompaniedwhen the issues were discussed. As a result, they claimed that the informal warning, subsequently confirmedin writing and included as part of their disciplinary record, was in reality aformal warning and fell within the Act. The tribunal agreed, as did the EAT. There is no right to be accompanied in any hearing resulting in theadministration of an informal warning. An informal warning might signal theinitiation of the formal disciplinary procedure in the future, if there was anyrepetition of the behaviour that gave rise to the warning. However, the EATfound in this case that because a disciplinary warning became part of anemployee’s record under LU procedure, it became a formal warning, and thereforegave rise to the statutory right to be accompanied. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Make UK launches new Covid 19 HR & Legal Support Programme to protect businesses and safeguard jobs

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first_imgNew package of help for employers – all the essential help in one place to get businesses back to workMake UK, has developed a new online suite of services to help employers with the challenges of preparing to bring their workforce back to work post COVID 19. It provides the essential support needed for businesses to take fast, effective action and make the right decisions around government initiatives such as the job retention scheme.It also gives step-by-step guidance on preparing the workplace to enable an increasing number of workers to be back on-site safely.The new Covid 19 HR & Legal Support programme gives direct and speedy access to expert advice and guidance on a month by month basis, helping companies protect their workforce and make the best strategic decisions.It includes: No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Related posts:No related photos. Downloadable checklists including –HR & Employment law checklist outlining key areas of compliance and workforce planningHealth and Safety checklist covering the considerations and risk assessments to carry out following shutdownProduction and Operations checklist outlining key processes, procedures and business continuity across your entire business operationsChecklist for managing employees who need to quarantineA pre-recorded webinar from our experts giving advice and tips to help you get back up and running as quickly as possible For those companies which are having to take the difficult decision of looking to lose some of their staff, there is also a redundancy webinar in the context of COVID 19. And completing the package is a COVID 19 Management Training Resource Pack that includes e-learning programme for managers and a risk assessment template and policy.This e-learning programme has been developed in line with the very latest Government guidance to help manufacturers manage their workforce safely and efficiently by understanding the threats of the virus and how it works, how it is spread, destroyed and the major risk factors.The second part of the course provides clear guidance on how to manage social distancing in a factory or workplace setting with a final section on cleaning and personal hygiene and how to make that work in a work setting.Nicola Kibble, Make UK’s Head of HR & Legal Commercial Services said:“Making those strategic decisions correctly and in a timely fashion is essential for the continued success of companies as they come out of this crisis and look to get back to normal production.  Our central legal team works closely with Government to make sure the legislation works as well as it can for you and we are focused on interpreting that legislation, explaining clearly and simply what you have to do in order to comply.“These new online resources offer a one-stop-shop for clear direction for companies of all sizes enabling managers to take fast and effective action and make the best choices to futureproof your businesses as you move forward.”To sign up or find out more https://www.makeuk.org/hereforyouBack to Business Support Pack is free for Make UK members and £75 +VAT for non-membersCovid E-Learning and Support Pack costs £50 +VAT for Make UK members and £100 + VAT for non-memberscenter_img Make UK launches new Covid 19 HR & Legal Support Programme to protect businesses and safeguard jobsOn 3 Jun 2020 in PROMOTED CONTENT, Latest News, Legal Q&A, Personnel Today, Retention of staff Previous Article Next Article A new COVID helpline to provide access to expert support and guidanceA back-to-business support pack that includes a Return from Furlough template letter – designed to help organisations appropriately communicate to an employee when they are to return to work following furloughlast_img read more

VTS to acquire office-tracking app for about $100M

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first_imgVTS CEO Nick Romito and Rise Buildings CEO Prasan Kale (VTS, Rise Buildings)As companies consider how they can safely bring employees back to offices, mobile apps that can monitor worker movements — and thus ensure they’re abiding by Covid-19 safety protocols — are growing in popularity.One such app, Rise Buildings, is set to be acquired by New York startup VTS for around $100 million, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources familiar with the transaction. Rise is a Chicago-based startup that has a mobile app used in approximately 350 buildings totaling over 130 million square feet of office space.Its CEO, Prasan Kale, said that individual data is also kept anonymous, and that employees can opt out of using it.A similar app, Toronto-based Lane, is used in more than 300 buildings in eight countries. It launched its first funding round in May, which raised $10 million. The company says that it’s now being used by big office landlords, including Brookfield Office Properties, Oxford Properties and Tishman Studio.ADVERTISEMENTEmployers can use these apps to see if a conference room is too crowded or to see how many people are sitting in a particular space, according to the report. They can also be used to report issues to building management.For landlords, the apps provide an opportunity to see how tenants are using their buildings, including anticipating which ones may be bringing in additional employees or scaling down.Nick Romito, the CEO of VTS, told the publication that his firm has been watching the nascent office app category since before the pandemic, and now sees it as an asset for landlords.“In the return-to-work every owner has to make sure their tenants know what’s going on,” he said.[WSJ] — Keith Larsen Tags Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Commercial Real Estateoffice marketProptechlast_img read more

The influence of seasonal variation, diet and physical activity on Ssrum lipids in young men in Antarctica

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first_imgThe long-term effects of diet, physical activity and seasonal variation on serum lipids have been studied over a period of one year (1961) in members of the British and South African Antarctic Surveys based at Halley Bay (75.30°S) and Sanae (70.30°S). The duration of the study spanned roughly three seasons: (1) February to April (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –12 to –21°c., strenuous activity and average daily food intake of 3,850 calories; (2) April to September (winter) with polar night and outside temperatures ranging from –23 to –35°c., minimal activity and a food intake of 3,363 calories; and (3) September to January (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –6 to –14°c., strenuous activity (including sledging journeys) and food intake of 3,663 calories. Seasonal changes in serum total cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride levels were minimal although physical activity and dietary intake showed considerable variation; the latter factors apparently balancing each other. The changes in the alpha- and beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were significant. In winter beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels rose significantly while alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol levels fell significantly. Similar significant changes were shown after sledging journeys; increased activity and energy expenditure resulting in decreased beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration with a corresponding increase in alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. One month after the sledging journeys, the levels had returned to those which existed before sledging. Studies with subjects spending their second year in the polar regions showed attenuation of all lipid parameters investigated.last_img read more

Tests of Antarctic soils for insect parasitic nematodes

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first_imgNematodes of the families Heterorhabditidae and Steinernematidae are obligate parasites of a wide range of insects (Poinar 1979). The third stage juvenile of these nematodes is a non-feeding infective form which carries symbiotic insect-pathogenic bacteria (Xenorhabdus spp.) in its intestine. Under favourable conditions the juveniles can survive for months in the soil. They are attracted to and enter insects. After invading the haemocoel they release the symbiont. The bacteria multiply, kill the host by septicaemia, and provide suitable conditions for nematode growth and reproduction. After one to two weeks, the newly formed infective juveniles leave the cadaver and seek new hosts.last_img read more

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