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Combined morphological and molecular analysis of individual nematodes through short-term preservation in formalin

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first_imgSmall metazoans such as marine nematodes are increasingly identified using both molecular and morphological techniques. Formalin is the preferred fixative for morphological analysis but specimens become unsuitable for molecular study due to formalin-induced modification of DNA. Nematodes fixed in ethanol work well for molecular studies but become unsuitable for taxonomy due to shrinkage. Here we show for the first time that formalin can be used as a short-term fixative (≤ 7 days) for marine nematodes, allowing both morphological and molecular work to be conducted on the same individual. No sequence ambiguities were detected in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) following short-term formalin preservation.last_img read more

Weber State Football’s Jay Hill Named AFCA Regional Coach of the Year

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first_img Written by December 10, 2019 /Sports News – Local Weber State Football’s Jay Hill Named AFCA Regional Coach of the Year FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOGDEN, Utah-Tuesday, Weber State head football coach Jay Hill was named as the FCS Region 5 Coach of the Year by the American Football Coaches Association.Hill, who is 34-14 (.708) in his sixth season as the Wildcats’ head coach, has Weber State in the FCS quarterfinals Friday evening against Montana and has led the squad to four consecutive FCS playoff appearances, a school record.Other school records Hill has achieved include three straight Big Sky Conference titles, three straight 10-win seasons and a No. 3 ranking, which the Wildcats are currently ranked ahead of the quarterfinals game against the Grizzlies.Hill’s 34 wins are tied for the most in school history and he is 21-3 (.875) in Big Sky games over the course of the past three seasons.This is Hill’s first Region Coach of the Year honor and he is only the second coach in program history to achieve this.Veteran college head coach Mike Price won this award at Weber State in 1987. That season, the Wildcats went 9-2 (6-1 in Big Sky play) and advanced to the then-I-AA quarterfinals. Brad James Tags: AFCA/Coach of the Year/Jay Hill/Weber State Footballlast_img read more

Kanab’s Girls In First Place At Pine View Invitational After Day 1 of competition

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first_imgMarch 26, 2021 /Sports News – Local Kanab’s Girls In First Place At Pine View Invitational After Day 1 of competition Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailST. GEORGE, Utah-Friday, the Pine View Invitational commenced at Pine View High School with the first seven events in the book.Through Day 1 of competition, Kanab’s girls are in first place with 32 points. Wasatch is second with 22 points. Millard is third with 21 points. Milford is 10th with 12 points. Richfield is tied for 18th place with Lehi and Pleasant Grove (4 points apiece). Panguitch is in 21st place with 3 points.For the boys, Orem is in the lead with 34 points. Kanab is seventh with 12 points. Millard is tied with Pine View and Enterprise (6 points apiece) in 12th place.Milford is tied for 15th place (5 points apiece) with Cedar Valley and Corner Canyon.Richfield is tied for 18th place (4 points apiece) with Cedar City and Delta is in 25th place with one point.Here are the completed events as follows. Any Mid-Utah Radio Sports Network athlete who finished in the top 8 will receive bold face.Girls 1600 Meter RunCaila Odekirk-Hurricane 5:01.07Oakley Olson-Morgan 5:05.07Mari Konold-Mountain View 5:07.78Brea Bulkley-Snow Canyon 5:10.88Caroline Moon-Lehi 5:11.00Madison Strasner-Desert Hills 5:11.75Ali Baker-Pine View 5:13.01Gwen Sepp-Dixie 5:14.15Boys 1600 Meter RunBrock Coombs-Wasatch 5:00.11Eastin McCotter-Wasatch 5:05.05Wyatt Gardner-Enterprise 5:09.41Merritt Meccariello-Emery 5:10.64Mitchell Goold-Richfield 5:11.24Christian Spencer-Wasatch 5:12.04Gavin Clarke-Crimson Cliffs 5:13.05Carson Utley-Richfield 5:13.08Girls 4 x 800 Park City Miners (Klaire Kovar, Kaylee Hale, Chloe Shewell, Leah Yaeger) 9:52.96Pine View Panthers (Adri Baker, Pyper Holt, Kyanne Klein, Alli Baker) 9:52.97Timpanogos Silverwolves (Aldana Navarrete-Lamas, Abby Benson, Raygan Peterson, Afton Stubbs) 10:11.54Crimson Cliffs Mustangs (Sarah Ellis, Skyla Finlison, Alex Young, McKenzie Jepson) 10:28.26Pleasant Grove Vikings (Sariah Hernandez, Lauren Steeves, Samantha Carver, Marcela Carver) 10:32.34Mountain View Bruins (Grace Wood, Jenna Chariton, Ember Chariton, Alysa Lindley) 10:41.04Orem Tigers (Analise Dean, Emma Brown, Ella Cruz, McKenzie Jordan) 10:41.57Wasatch Wasps (Brooke Hunsaker, Jordan Gibby, Allison Munck, Kate Giles) 10:50.16Boys 4 x 800Timpanogos Silverwolves (Luke Douglas, McKay Christensen, Kyler Bramall, Bronson Dameron) 8:10.20Mountain View Bruins (Braden Minor, Tyler Chipman, Liam Heninger, Keeya Wood) 8:16.66Orem Tigers (Giovanni Ramirez, Spencer Greenwood, Brevin VanBuren, Tayson Echohawk) 8:18.72Pine View Panthers (Jason Lunt, Scottie Bushar, Zack Del Toro, Boston Horspool) 8:36.62Richfield Wildcats (Cannon Anderson, Richard Crane, Tyler Johnson, Tyler Saunders) 8:49.29Pleasant Grove Vikings (Trevin Harbertson, Nathan Hillhouse, Mike Carver, Steven Carver) 8:55.24Dixie Flyers (Reed Bigham, Glenn Butterfield, Carter Matthews, Aiden Kurtz) 8:57.27Desert Hills Thunder (Jake Barney, Isaac Lay, Brandon Brown, Luke Bruin) 9:03.05Girls High Jump1. Madi Orton-Kanab 5-02.002. Mikelle Church-Kanab 5-00.003. Lexi Vernsey-Wasatch 5-00.004. Alisha Maxwell-Wasatch 4-11.005. Kelsi Oldroyd-Cedar 4-11.006. Kara Acor-Desert Hills 4-10.007. Morgan Kobe-Morgan 4-10.008. Tylee Davis-Hurricane 4-10.00Boys Long JumpHyrum Fechser-Water Canyon 21-00.50Tyson Parker-Desert Hills 21-00.50Bryant Jimenez-Enterprise 20-06.00Bentley Derrick-Cedar Valley 20-06.00Trond Grizzell-Park City 20-04.00Cole Johnson Orem 20-03.25Travis Stewart-Kanab 19-09.50Britton Smith-Delta 19-07.00Boys DiscusMichael Horton-Parowan 117-10Matthew Wilde-Canyon View 109-06Chris Esparza-Mountain View 109-04Parker North-Wasatch 109-03Braxton Bond-Millard 104-09Colton Gardner-Canyon View 104-08Ryan Chesnik-Desert Hills 103-03Thomas Floyd-Morgan 102-03Girls JavelinLogann Laws-Cedar City 126-08.50Mary DeGraffenried-Millard 117-00.50Paige Berg-Wasatch 115-05Aspen Bergener-Canyon View 112-00Kelsi Oldroyd-Cedar 109-10Kaelynn Cox-Panguitch 103-09.50Dallee Cobb-Enterprise 98-10Jessie Reidhead-Kanab 95-09Girls Shot PutShailee Bundy-Desert Hills 37-05.25Abby Bateman-Kanab 31-02.50Madysen Griffiths-Milford 30-09.75Josie Gines-Orem 30-05.00Holly Torgerson-Richfield 30-01.50Zoie Whitaker-Millard 30-01.50Angela Rex-Orem 29-07.50Elle Jones-Park City 29-07.50center_img Brad Jameslast_img read more

Court of Appeals Upholds Denial Of Request To Set Aside 1997 Divorce Decree

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first_imgCourt Of Appeals Upholds Denial Of Request To Set Aside 1997 Divorce Decree Olivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comThe denial of a woman’s request to set aside her divorce decree nearly 20 years after the end of her marriage because of fraud on the part of her ex-husband has been upheld by the Indiana Court of Appeals.In the case of Julie R. Waterfield v. Richard D. Waterfield, 92A03-1511-PL-1968, Julie Waterfield petitioned the Whitley Superior Court to re-open her divorce settlement agreement – which was entered into in 1997 – after coming to the conclusion that he ex-husband committed fraud and forced her into an agreement that was more than $80 million less than what she was entitled to.In May 1997, Julie Waterfield filed for divorce and agreed to a settlement of $20 million, including almost $19.5 million in cash and a lake cottage on Clear Lake near Fremont in December of the same year.While negotiating the settlement, Richard Waterfield produced a disclosure statement listing the property that was part of their marital estate. Julie Waterfield’s attorneys advised her against settling until they conducted a detailed discovery into the estate her ex-husband had presented.Julie Waterfield ignored that advice and chose to settle without the discovery, but one month later told her attorneys that she regretted that decision.In July 2003, nearly six years after entering into the settlement agreement, Julie Waterfield filed a complaint against her ex-husband and accused him of intentionally undervaluing or excluding assets in his list of the marital estate and committing fraud valued at $80 million. Richard Waterfield filed a counterclaim, citing abuse of process and requesting statutory attorney fees.The trial court entered into partial summary judgment against Julie Waterfield’s claims of undervaluing in 2006 and full summary judgment against all of her claims in 2009.Julie Waterfield then moved for summary judgment against both of her ex-husband’s claims in 2012, but that motion was denied in 2013.The following year, she requested access to documents related to Richard Waterfield’s attorney fees claims, which prompted him to serve her with a discovery request to access her divorce attorney’s files. Richard Waterfield said those files contained information that could be used to refute her fraud allegation by showing how much knowledge she had of the marital estate and the process of discovery and settlement. Julie Waterfield fought her ex-husband’s discovery request, saying it violated attorney-client privileges.Julie Waterfield failed to comply with the discovery request in 2014, saying in 2015 that her attorney had been too sick to gather the documents. As a result of her lack of cooperation, the trial court awarded default judgment as a discovery sanction to Richard Waterfield.The Whitley Superior Court also awarded Richard Waterfield $842,021 in attorney fees in October 2015.In its response to her appeal, the Indiana Court of Appeals wrote that although Julie Waterfield contended that she relied solely on Richard Waterfield’s representations when making the decision to enter into the settlement, and that she had no reason to ask for an independent evaluation of the value of the marital estate, she could not hide behind attorney-client privilege to keep her ex-husband from accessing documents that would contradict her testimony.Further, when the communications between Julie Waterfield and her attorney were disclosed, they showed that she was advised at least three different times not to enter into the settlement without doing a detailed discovery. Julie Waterfield signed three different letters acknowledging her attorney’s advice, but still chose to enter the settlement.By signing these documents, the appellate court wrote that Julie Waterfield surrendered her right to claim she relied on misinformation from her ex-husband when entering into the settlement to support her fraud allegation.Julie Waterfield also appealed the court’s decision to deny her motion for summary judgment against her ex-husband’s claims of abuse of process. However, the Court of Appeals wrote that the timing of her decision to file suit against her ex-husband – in 2003, shortly after he remarried in 2002 – indicates that she entered into the legal process for a purpose other than what it is intended for.Further, the appellate court wrote that Julie Waterfield’s new counsel failed to review the communications between his client and her previous counsel. Had he done so, he would have learned of her previous attorney’s advice not to enter into the settlement without a discovery, which could have prevented her lawsuit against her ex-husband.“Accordingly, we cannot say that Julie used the legal process to accomplish an outcome which the process was designed to accomplish,” the Court of Appeals wrote in its Friday opinion.Julie Waterfield also appealed the default judgment as a sanction against her. While the appellate court wrote that it sympathized her with attorney’s illness, it also wrote that the illness did not strike until more than a month after the discovery request.Finally, Julie Waterfield appealed the decision to award her ex-husband attorney fees. But because her new attorney prolonged the litigation process by failing to research her communications with her previous attorney and ignoring the court’s discovery orders, the Court of Appeals said Richard Waterfield was entitled to an attorney fee award.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Fresh ferment for crusty breads

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first_imgBakels has launched a clean-label powdered bread improver with added sourdough, suitable for creating high-quality artisanal crusty loaves.The baking ingredients firm has created Premium Ferment 4%, an ingredient that can produce long-process bread in less than three hours, with only one hour required for bulk fermentation and no sponge dough required. It is suitable for both hand-moulding and automated equipment and can help deliver the appearance, crunch, flavour and aroma of sourdough breads, such as baguettes and ciabatta.The improver is used at 4% of the flour weight and can be incorporated with standard bakers’ flour, saving on costs of speciality flours. It also offers the added benefit of increased yield through greater usage of water at up to 74% in the standard recommended recipe.Pauline Ferrol, national sales controller for British Bakels, said: “The unrivalled quality and consistency of breads produced from our new Premium Ferment 4% really stand out from other crusty goods. They have a distinctive and appetising appearance and really do eat and taste as good as they look.”Bakels’ Premium Ferment 4% is available in 15kg bags.last_img read more

Video: Fantasy Showdown — Bristol

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first_img___________________________________________________________________________________________We apologize. We are having technical issues with our comment sections and fan community and it is temporarily unavailable. We are actively working on these issues and hope to have it up and running soon. We are also working on enhancements to provide a better forum for our fans. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.last_img

If he builds it, the artists come

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first_imgThe Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts is one of the most famous buildings at Harvard. And like many important structures, Le Corbusier’s only North American masterpiece has been preserved down to the smallest of details — the patina of the concrete floors, the bold primary colors of accent walls.But to Ed Lloyd, the Carpenter Center’s first-floor entry hall is a blank slate, ready to be wiped clean and reimagined every other month. As the center’s exhibitions manager, Lloyd has the job of reconfiguring the building’s 2,500-square-foot Main Gallery (as well as its smaller Sert Gallery) up to six times a year to suit the ideas, aesthetics, and whims of the artists whose work is shown there.“It’s a beautiful room,” Lloyd said one afternoon, relaxing in front of “Hellos and Goodbyes,” a series of prints of waving hands that is part of the gallery’s latest exhibition, “Annette Lemieux: Unfinished Business.” But there’s always a caveat: ????You have to compromise.”Because nothing can be permanently altered in the glass-and-concrete space, Lloyd starts fresh with each exhibition, right down to constructing the white walls. In every case, his goal is to bring artists’ work to life despite any constraints. He’s equal parts handyman, designer, organizer, negotiator, and visionary.The job lends itself to extremes, as when performance artist and provocateur William Pope.L staged “Corbu Pops” at the Center in 2009. The frenetic show involved turning a bench into a puppet stage, shooting a video piece, creating theater lighting, hiring a New Jersey sculptor to create models, coordinating rehearsals of a student performance, and locating five gallons of Vaseline to cover a large table in the middle of the room. (Why the petroleum jelly? “You’d have to speak to the artist about that,” Lloyd demurred.)Other times, Lloyd does more tearing down than building. For a 2007 Félix González-Torres exhibition, he cleared out the normally austere Main Gallery and covered the floor with 2,500 pounds of foil-wrapped candies, filling the room with a glittering, golden glow.“It was really elegant and beautiful and simple,” Lloyd said.People skills are critical. On any given day, Lloyd interacts with artists, curators, assistants, trade workers, and movers, a mix of the scholarly, the free-spirited, and the blue collar. Most important, he must build trust with the artists in each show.“It’s important that the artist communicates to you what they want and that they believe you can execute it,” he said. “Once an artist is comfortable with you and you have that dialogue, you can make decisions without having to check in constantly. But you have to build that relationship.”He prefers to design in his head first, sketching later on floor plans, and never relying on models, which can create a false sense of the space.“I know how the room works and what it lends itself to,” he said. “It’s just like making a painting or a sculpture. You start with that same aesthetic process.”Lloyd grew up in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. As a boy, he was drawn to Skidmore College’s art gallery. He moved to Boston in the 1980s to attend the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and slowly worked toward a degree in painting, taking part-time jobs in galleries, artists’ studios, and the school’s exhibition department to pay his bills.“I always needed to work, so anything I could do to stay within a gallery or the arts was a plus,” he said. After graduating in 1990, he eventually became exhibitions manager at the Museum School’s Grossman Gallery, where he stayed for 12 years. He came to the Carpenter Center in 2005.He shares his South End home with his wife, a curator. Being married to a fellow art professional helps keep him sane and inspired in his work.“I can go home with problems, and they can be understood,” he said.When he’s not working, Lloyd spends a lot of time outdoors, in part to counteract the mental strain of staring at the same two rooms for a living: “Everywhere, white walls,” he joked. He also golfs — an admittedly unlikely hobby — at Boston’s public courses, where he can avoid the “golf carts and cigars and plaid-pants” crowd.Of course, Lloyd also sees other shows, but he often finds it difficult to quiet his internal exhibitions manager.“The design becomes my nemesis for enjoying the art,” he said with a laugh. At other galleries and museums, he often finds himself scrutinizing “not the show itself, but the process of how it got there, and how and why it was decided.”If he and his team are doing their job well, Lloyd said, their work shouldn’t be noticed at all. It’s the perfect job for a modest guy who eschews the spotlight. “When a show is perfectly done, perfectly designed,” he said, “the work that I do is not there. You don’t see it.”last_img read more

With Visitas canceled, Harvard improvises

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first_imgWilliam R. Fitzsimmons was running the Boston Marathon with his wife, Pat, on Monday when the downtown bombings forced them off the course at mile 20. On Friday, Harvard College’s dean of admissions and financial aid again was dealing with matters beyond his control, in this case an area-wide lockdown. He was greeting high school students at Logan Airport as they arrived for the College’s planned program for newly admitted students, Visitas.Nearly 1,400 students who had been accepted to Harvard, some of them coming from as far as Australia and India, were heading to Cambridge for three days of activities, before security officials decided to shut down the Boston area early Friday to hunt for the remaining marathon bombing suspect. The edict meant Harvard officials had to cancel Visitas.“With the region-wide lockdown and all the uncertainty and anxiety created on campus by shootings and the ongoing manhunt, we decided to alert the people not to even begin their trips, and to give those on their way a chance to turn around,” Fitzsimmons said Saturday. “You couldn’t even get to Cambridge yesterday. And by the time the situation was over last night, too many people had already changed their travel plans.”The annual weekend known as Visitas is a much-loved introduction to the Harvard experience. Admitted freshmen, often accompanied by family members, come for their first true taste of campus life. Students stay with hosts in the freshmen dorms and Harvard Houses. They attend parties, dances, lectures, panel discussions, and activity fairs. They eat in the dining halls and explore the University’s diverse academic and extracurricular offerings.Harvard officials posted a message on the Harvard College Admissions website just before 7 a.m. Friday, added the same message to the Facebook page that had been created for members of the incoming Class of 2017, and emailed all admitted students and their Harvard hosts, saying the University was closed and Visitas registration had been suspended. Three hours later, another message went out asking those who had not yet begun traveling to Cambridge not to start out, and requesting students already en route to “stay where you are for the time being.”By noon, decision had been madeAs the day wore on, University officials, including Fitzsimmons and admissions officers and Visitas co-chairs Amelia Muller and Mike Esposito, held several conference calls to determine the event’s future. By noon, the decision had been made: Visitas was canceled.Saturday afternoon, Harvard President Drew Faust emailed a note to the prospective members of the Class of 2017, offering them her regrets at the change of plans, and encouraging them to make Harvard a part of their future.“Whether you are an aspiring artist or scientist, whether you are from Minneapolis or Mumbai,” wrote Faust, “whether your passions find you on the playing field or in the orchestra pit, whether you draw your intellectual energy from parsing texts or debating policy issues or writing code, I hope we will have the privilege of your joining the Harvard community.”Melanie Slone, an admitted member of the class, left her hometown of Bellbrook, Ohio, at 6 a.m. Friday with her friend Jake Brewer, who had been admitted at Boston University, to make the long drive to visit the colleges they will soon call home. They were cruising through New York when Slone received an email from Harvard saying the weekend was canceled.Though they turned around and headed home, Slone seemed undeterred.“I’m still coming to Harvard next year, and I’m still very excited,” she said.While Visitas would have kicked off officially with an address from Faust, hundreds of early arriving students, many traveling with their parents, were already on their way. Many landed at Logan Friday morning. Noah Selsby, Harvard’s assistant dean for administration, who lives a 5-minute ride from the airport, headed to the international terminal. There, with help from Massport officials who put up signs directing those arriving to a section on the terminal’s ground floor, he began tracking down students and explaining the shutdown.Fitzsimmons soon joined him. Together they ordered pizza for the approximately 85 students and close to 20 parents, helped some reschedule return flights for later that day, and found hotel rooms for the remainder. Gene Corbin, assistant dean of public service in the Office of Student Life, grabbed some colleagues, borrowed a number of vans from Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House, and hurried to the airport to help shuttle students to a Holiday Inn Express in Saugus. Michael Burke, registrar for Harvard’s Faculty of Art and Sciences, did the same with his car, as did Sean Palfrey, co-master of Adams House.Members of the Harvard community took to Twitter in force, using the hashtag #virtualvisitas, to reach out to the students. “The Harvard community thrives on the resourcefulness of its members,” said Harvard College Fellow Carla D. Martin. “#virtualvisitas is a great example of that.” Screenshot of TwitterA slice of Harvard at LoganStudent Yusuph Mkangara arrived at Logan at 9 a.m. from Columbus, Ohio, with a friend who was also headed to Visitas. Knowing that the MBTA had already been shut down, they waited and checked their smartphones until they received an email from Harvard officials telling them to meet in Terminal E.They arrived at the terminal’s “Camp Harvard” and shared pizza with other students while University officials helped them sort out their options. The resulting get-together wasn’t Visitas, but it was a little slice of Harvard nonetheless, Mkangara said.“The weird beauty of the situation is I’ve gone to other visiting programs, and I’ve never gotten to meet more than, say, 10 people,” he said. “These are the people who are going to be my classmates. … It puts a damper on it that we can’t see the campus and meet upperclassmen, but it’s been wonderful to know that this is a sample of who we’re going to be with.”Though his spirits were high, Mkangara recognized he would have an even harder choice ahead of him as he decided between Harvard — which he had not visited — and Yale.“Harvard was my dream school, my No. 1,” he said. “This visit was really supposed to make my final decision for me. It’s going to be a lot tougher now.” (On Saturday, though, Mkangara was coming to campus. At 10 a.m. he tweeted “Headed to #Harvard. #TheAmericanRESOLVE  #IvyDreams!”)Despite their disappointment, the students at Logan remained upbeat. They snapped pictures with potential future classmates and posted them to Facebook, and played impromptu “get to know you” games. Many of the students who were staying the night even opted for the Saugus hotel instead of one located at the airport, so they could continue bonding with their new friends.“They just wanted to stay together,” said Selsby.Dean William Fitzsimmons and Noah Selsby, assistant dean for administration, ordered pizza to feed the 85 students and close to 20 parents who they tracked down at Logan. Photo by Noah SelsbyHandling a difficult situationThe afternoon and evening proved a lesson in character. As the head of Harvard admissions, Fitzsimmons said one of the qualities he looks for in prospective students is their ability to handle difficult situations.“It’s really been an amazing thing watching how the students have come together, and the parents have been very understanding. We’ve seen an enormous amount of grace under pressure,” he said, adding that the University would cover any additional costs for the students and their families, including meals, hotels, and flight-change fees. “We’ve made it possible for them not to incur any financial loss as a result of this tragedy.”As the clock spun toward 9 p.m., Fitzsimmons and Selsby were still waiting for a young woman who was arriving from New Delhi. Suddenly, the weary student approached. “I’m delighted we found you,” exclaimed the dean.There were other developments concerning the new class in Harvard’s virtual world. Members of the Harvard community took to Twitter in force, using the hashtag #virtualvisitas, to reach out to the students. Throughout the day, tweets poured in from Harvard faculty, students, alumni, and staff who encouraged students with questions to get in touch.Like countless residents of the Greater Boston area, Harvard College Fellow Carla D. Martin was stuck inside monitoring the manhunt when she saw the Harvard tweet about #virtualvisitas. A 2003 graduate of the College who went on to earn her masters and her Ph.D. from Harvard, Martin tweeted out a note inviting members of the Class of 2017 to get in touch with questions about her specialties: African and African American studies, social anthropology, and music.Greetings from virtual Veritas“Since we all are on lockdown today, it’s a good way to put our energy into something positive,” said Martin on Friday afternoon. Soon, she noticed many alumni from her year, and even her current Harvard students, joining in the virtual conversation. “The Harvard community thrives on the resourcefulness of its members,” Martin said. “#virtualvisitas is a great example of that.”Kirkland resident Ibrahim Khan was in Los Angeles with some of his Harvard roommates, headed to the music festival Coachella and using Twitter to follow the news in Boston, when he read a tweet about #virtualvisitas.“Harvard 2017ers, I’m a junior in Kirkland and happy to answer any questions you have. I hope you are all staying safe,” Khan tweeted out.While the University has no plans to reschedule Visitas, Fitzsimmons said he would consider extending the acceptance deadline beyond May 1 for students who had planned to attend the weekend event. In addition, the University will continue to connect with undecided incoming freshmen via email, phone, and social media, he said, to help them in any way possible.“We will do whatever we can to help them in making their decision,” said Fitzsimmons.last_img read more

Exotic Christmas Gifts

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first_imgIf you’re shopping for a holiday gift plant, you’re bound to see some odd, exoticplants among your garden center offerings.Some may be growing on what looks like little stumps. Most have brightly colored leavesor peculiar flowers and thick, waxy leaves.They’re called bromeliads.”Bromeliaceae is a very large family of plants,” said Paul Thomas, ahorticulturist with the University of Georgia Extension Service. “They’re epiphytic,which means they grow on trees, usually in very tropical environments.”The bromeliads you’re apt to buy in stores aren’t Georgia products. They come fromSouth and Central America, from Peru and Chile up through Mexico.”Georgia has a native bromeliad,” Thomas said. “It’s called Spanishmoss, which is a Tillandsia plant. As you go further south into Florida, you’llfind many other Tillandsias.”Another famous bromeliad is the pineapple. That’s one of the biggest plants in thefamily, although there are a few bigger species.”So you have bromeliads that you eat, and you have some that can be used aspacking material,” Thomas said. “Another whole group is floriferous — they’regrown for their exotic flowers.”Among these plants, the ones you’ll find in stores this Christmas and throughout theyear, are Cryptomeria, which are sometimes called “Christmas stars” andother names. “They’re noted for their multicolored, flat, pineapple-likeleaves,” Thomas said. “They make a wonderful indoor ground cover and neat potplants.”One spectacular bromeliad is a Vriesia. “This plant has huge red bracts onthe flower scape,” he said. “It sends up what looks like a large, bright redsword, which opens up to reveal bright blue flowers.”Bromeliads come in countless shapes and sizes, from tiny things to giants. And thegreat thing about them, Thomas said, is “they’re all fairly easy to grow.”They grow best in medium light. So they do well in east- or west-facing windows. Andthey grow well under artificial light.”You can carry them outdoors in the summer, and they’ll bloom like crazy,”Thomas said.But remember, they’re epiphytes — they grow on other plants. “They like to bewatered, but they’re used to having the water run off,” he said. “You can growthem well in a pot in a regular potting mix, but you have to let the mix dry out from timeto time.”Or you can attach them to slabs of bark. “They’ll slowly root into the bark,”he said, “but you’ll have to water them more often.”A unique thing about watering bromeliads, Thomas said, is that their leaves arecomplete rosettes, forming perfect cups.”That’s how a tree dweller survives,” he said. “They’re used to catchingwater that way. So water the plant from top to bottom to keep adequate moisture in thosecups.”To keep the plant looking its best, you’ll need to give it a thorough shower everycouple of weeks or so.These plants don’t like a lot of fertilizer, though. Thomas’ rule-of-thumb is to dividethe label recommendations of your normal houseplant fertilizer by four.Bromeliads are annuals in Georgia. They’re not cold-tolerant. In south Florida, though,they keep growing as long as people take care of them.”You can have bromeliads that are 10 or 15 years old,” Thomas said, “ifyou bring them inside when it turns cool and keep them watered.”Bromeliads are resistant to most diseases, as long as you don’t let the roots getsaturated. They’re resistant to most insects, too.And even apartment dwellers who don’t have many windows can have big collections ofbromeliads.”Many of these plants are tiny,” Thomas said. “The entire plant may bethe size of your thumb. And they grow very slowly. So you can have a big collection ofbromeliads on a single window sill.”last_img read more

Welch announces staff changes

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first_imgUS Rep. Peter Welch announced Tuesday a set of staff transitions geared toward supporting his work on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, to which he was appointed in January.Welch hired Stephanie Krenrich as Senior Legislative Assistant with a focus on health, education, housing and the environment. Mary Sprayregen, who previously served as Welch s Business Liaison in his Vermont office, has joined the Congressman s Washington office as a Legislative Assistant with a focus on business, energy, telecommunications and appropriations. I am pleased to welcome Stephanie Krenrich to our team and Mary Sprayregen to our Washington office, Welch said. Stephanie has proven herself as an accomplished legislative assistant and brings a great deal of knowledge and experience to our office. Mary was an invaluable asset to our Vermont office and to the state s business community, and I am excited she will be joining our Washington team.Stephanie Krenrich (Senior Legislative Assistant), a six-year veteran of the House, brings extensive legislative experience to the Welch office. Krenrich previously served as Legislative Assistant for Rep. Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ) and for Rep. Lane Evans (D-Ill.). Before that, she served as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer for the Montana Legal Services Association in Helena. Krenrich graduated from New York University with a degree in politics and will graduate from Johns Hopkins University with an M.A. in government later this year.Mary Sprayregen (Legislative Assistant), a native of Charlotte, Vt., has worked in Congressman Welch s Vermont office as Business Liaison since January, 2007. Prior to that, Sprayregen served as Director of Government Affairs for the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce and GBIC. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Skidmore College with a B.A. in sociology and law, Sprayregen has also worked as a policy researcher evaluating Vermont s reparative probation program and as an English teacher in Italy.Source: Representative Welchlast_img read more

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