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Video: Fantasy Showdown — Bristol

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first_img___________________________________________________________________________________________We apologize. We are having technical issues with our comment sections and fan community and it is temporarily unavailable. We are actively working on these issues and hope to have it up and running soon. We are also working on enhancements to provide a better forum for our fans. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.last_img

If he builds it, the artists come

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first_imgThe Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts is one of the most famous buildings at Harvard. And like many important structures, Le Corbusier’s only North American masterpiece has been preserved down to the smallest of details — the patina of the concrete floors, the bold primary colors of accent walls.But to Ed Lloyd, the Carpenter Center’s first-floor entry hall is a blank slate, ready to be wiped clean and reimagined every other month. As the center’s exhibitions manager, Lloyd has the job of reconfiguring the building’s 2,500-square-foot Main Gallery (as well as its smaller Sert Gallery) up to six times a year to suit the ideas, aesthetics, and whims of the artists whose work is shown there.“It’s a beautiful room,” Lloyd said one afternoon, relaxing in front of “Hellos and Goodbyes,” a series of prints of waving hands that is part of the gallery’s latest exhibition, “Annette Lemieux: Unfinished Business.” But there’s always a caveat: ????You have to compromise.”Because nothing can be permanently altered in the glass-and-concrete space, Lloyd starts fresh with each exhibition, right down to constructing the white walls. In every case, his goal is to bring artists’ work to life despite any constraints. He’s equal parts handyman, designer, organizer, negotiator, and visionary.The job lends itself to extremes, as when performance artist and provocateur William Pope.L staged “Corbu Pops” at the Center in 2009. The frenetic show involved turning a bench into a puppet stage, shooting a video piece, creating theater lighting, hiring a New Jersey sculptor to create models, coordinating rehearsals of a student performance, and locating five gallons of Vaseline to cover a large table in the middle of the room. (Why the petroleum jelly? “You’d have to speak to the artist about that,” Lloyd demurred.)Other times, Lloyd does more tearing down than building. For a 2007 Félix González-Torres exhibition, he cleared out the normally austere Main Gallery and covered the floor with 2,500 pounds of foil-wrapped candies, filling the room with a glittering, golden glow.“It was really elegant and beautiful and simple,” Lloyd said.People skills are critical. On any given day, Lloyd interacts with artists, curators, assistants, trade workers, and movers, a mix of the scholarly, the free-spirited, and the blue collar. Most important, he must build trust with the artists in each show.“It’s important that the artist communicates to you what they want and that they believe you can execute it,” he said. “Once an artist is comfortable with you and you have that dialogue, you can make decisions without having to check in constantly. But you have to build that relationship.”He prefers to design in his head first, sketching later on floor plans, and never relying on models, which can create a false sense of the space.“I know how the room works and what it lends itself to,” he said. “It’s just like making a painting or a sculpture. You start with that same aesthetic process.”Lloyd grew up in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. As a boy, he was drawn to Skidmore College’s art gallery. He moved to Boston in the 1980s to attend the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and slowly worked toward a degree in painting, taking part-time jobs in galleries, artists’ studios, and the school’s exhibition department to pay his bills.“I always needed to work, so anything I could do to stay within a gallery or the arts was a plus,” he said. After graduating in 1990, he eventually became exhibitions manager at the Museum School’s Grossman Gallery, where he stayed for 12 years. He came to the Carpenter Center in 2005.He shares his South End home with his wife, a curator. Being married to a fellow art professional helps keep him sane and inspired in his work.“I can go home with problems, and they can be understood,” he said.When he’s not working, Lloyd spends a lot of time outdoors, in part to counteract the mental strain of staring at the same two rooms for a living: “Everywhere, white walls,” he joked. He also golfs — an admittedly unlikely hobby — at Boston’s public courses, where he can avoid the “golf carts and cigars and plaid-pants” crowd.Of course, Lloyd also sees other shows, but he often finds it difficult to quiet his internal exhibitions manager.“The design becomes my nemesis for enjoying the art,” he said with a laugh. At other galleries and museums, he often finds himself scrutinizing “not the show itself, but the process of how it got there, and how and why it was decided.”If he and his team are doing their job well, Lloyd said, their work shouldn’t be noticed at all. It’s the perfect job for a modest guy who eschews the spotlight. “When a show is perfectly done, perfectly designed,” he said, “the work that I do is not there. You don’t see it.”last_img read more

With Visitas canceled, Harvard improvises

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first_imgWilliam R. Fitzsimmons was running the Boston Marathon with his wife, Pat, on Monday when the downtown bombings forced them off the course at mile 20. On Friday, Harvard College’s dean of admissions and financial aid again was dealing with matters beyond his control, in this case an area-wide lockdown. He was greeting high school students at Logan Airport as they arrived for the College’s planned program for newly admitted students, Visitas.Nearly 1,400 students who had been accepted to Harvard, some of them coming from as far as Australia and India, were heading to Cambridge for three days of activities, before security officials decided to shut down the Boston area early Friday to hunt for the remaining marathon bombing suspect. The edict meant Harvard officials had to cancel Visitas.“With the region-wide lockdown and all the uncertainty and anxiety created on campus by shootings and the ongoing manhunt, we decided to alert the people not to even begin their trips, and to give those on their way a chance to turn around,” Fitzsimmons said Saturday. “You couldn’t even get to Cambridge yesterday. And by the time the situation was over last night, too many people had already changed their travel plans.”The annual weekend known as Visitas is a much-loved introduction to the Harvard experience. Admitted freshmen, often accompanied by family members, come for their first true taste of campus life. Students stay with hosts in the freshmen dorms and Harvard Houses. They attend parties, dances, lectures, panel discussions, and activity fairs. They eat in the dining halls and explore the University’s diverse academic and extracurricular offerings.Harvard officials posted a message on the Harvard College Admissions website just before 7 a.m. Friday, added the same message to the Facebook page that had been created for members of the incoming Class of 2017, and emailed all admitted students and their Harvard hosts, saying the University was closed and Visitas registration had been suspended. Three hours later, another message went out asking those who had not yet begun traveling to Cambridge not to start out, and requesting students already en route to “stay where you are for the time being.”By noon, decision had been madeAs the day wore on, University officials, including Fitzsimmons and admissions officers and Visitas co-chairs Amelia Muller and Mike Esposito, held several conference calls to determine the event’s future. By noon, the decision had been made: Visitas was canceled.Saturday afternoon, Harvard President Drew Faust emailed a note to the prospective members of the Class of 2017, offering them her regrets at the change of plans, and encouraging them to make Harvard a part of their future.“Whether you are an aspiring artist or scientist, whether you are from Minneapolis or Mumbai,” wrote Faust, “whether your passions find you on the playing field or in the orchestra pit, whether you draw your intellectual energy from parsing texts or debating policy issues or writing code, I hope we will have the privilege of your joining the Harvard community.”Melanie Slone, an admitted member of the class, left her hometown of Bellbrook, Ohio, at 6 a.m. Friday with her friend Jake Brewer, who had been admitted at Boston University, to make the long drive to visit the colleges they will soon call home. They were cruising through New York when Slone received an email from Harvard saying the weekend was canceled.Though they turned around and headed home, Slone seemed undeterred.“I’m still coming to Harvard next year, and I’m still very excited,” she said.While Visitas would have kicked off officially with an address from Faust, hundreds of early arriving students, many traveling with their parents, were already on their way. Many landed at Logan Friday morning. Noah Selsby, Harvard’s assistant dean for administration, who lives a 5-minute ride from the airport, headed to the international terminal. There, with help from Massport officials who put up signs directing those arriving to a section on the terminal’s ground floor, he began tracking down students and explaining the shutdown.Fitzsimmons soon joined him. Together they ordered pizza for the approximately 85 students and close to 20 parents, helped some reschedule return flights for later that day, and found hotel rooms for the remainder. Gene Corbin, assistant dean of public service in the Office of Student Life, grabbed some colleagues, borrowed a number of vans from Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House, and hurried to the airport to help shuttle students to a Holiday Inn Express in Saugus. Michael Burke, registrar for Harvard’s Faculty of Art and Sciences, did the same with his car, as did Sean Palfrey, co-master of Adams House.Members of the Harvard community took to Twitter in force, using the hashtag #virtualvisitas, to reach out to the students. “The Harvard community thrives on the resourcefulness of its members,” said Harvard College Fellow Carla D. Martin. “#virtualvisitas is a great example of that.” Screenshot of TwitterA slice of Harvard at LoganStudent Yusuph Mkangara arrived at Logan at 9 a.m. from Columbus, Ohio, with a friend who was also headed to Visitas. Knowing that the MBTA had already been shut down, they waited and checked their smartphones until they received an email from Harvard officials telling them to meet in Terminal E.They arrived at the terminal’s “Camp Harvard” and shared pizza with other students while University officials helped them sort out their options. The resulting get-together wasn’t Visitas, but it was a little slice of Harvard nonetheless, Mkangara said.“The weird beauty of the situation is I’ve gone to other visiting programs, and I’ve never gotten to meet more than, say, 10 people,” he said. “These are the people who are going to be my classmates. … It puts a damper on it that we can’t see the campus and meet upperclassmen, but it’s been wonderful to know that this is a sample of who we’re going to be with.”Though his spirits were high, Mkangara recognized he would have an even harder choice ahead of him as he decided between Harvard — which he had not visited — and Yale.“Harvard was my dream school, my No. 1,” he said. “This visit was really supposed to make my final decision for me. It’s going to be a lot tougher now.” (On Saturday, though, Mkangara was coming to campus. At 10 a.m. he tweeted “Headed to #Harvard. #TheAmericanRESOLVE  #IvyDreams!”)Despite their disappointment, the students at Logan remained upbeat. They snapped pictures with potential future classmates and posted them to Facebook, and played impromptu “get to know you” games. Many of the students who were staying the night even opted for the Saugus hotel instead of one located at the airport, so they could continue bonding with their new friends.“They just wanted to stay together,” said Selsby.Dean William Fitzsimmons and Noah Selsby, assistant dean for administration, ordered pizza to feed the 85 students and close to 20 parents who they tracked down at Logan. Photo by Noah SelsbyHandling a difficult situationThe afternoon and evening proved a lesson in character. As the head of Harvard admissions, Fitzsimmons said one of the qualities he looks for in prospective students is their ability to handle difficult situations.“It’s really been an amazing thing watching how the students have come together, and the parents have been very understanding. We’ve seen an enormous amount of grace under pressure,” he said, adding that the University would cover any additional costs for the students and their families, including meals, hotels, and flight-change fees. “We’ve made it possible for them not to incur any financial loss as a result of this tragedy.”As the clock spun toward 9 p.m., Fitzsimmons and Selsby were still waiting for a young woman who was arriving from New Delhi. Suddenly, the weary student approached. “I’m delighted we found you,” exclaimed the dean.There were other developments concerning the new class in Harvard’s virtual world. Members of the Harvard community took to Twitter in force, using the hashtag #virtualvisitas, to reach out to the students. Throughout the day, tweets poured in from Harvard faculty, students, alumni, and staff who encouraged students with questions to get in touch.Like countless residents of the Greater Boston area, Harvard College Fellow Carla D. Martin was stuck inside monitoring the manhunt when she saw the Harvard tweet about #virtualvisitas. A 2003 graduate of the College who went on to earn her masters and her Ph.D. from Harvard, Martin tweeted out a note inviting members of the Class of 2017 to get in touch with questions about her specialties: African and African American studies, social anthropology, and music.Greetings from virtual Veritas“Since we all are on lockdown today, it’s a good way to put our energy into something positive,” said Martin on Friday afternoon. Soon, she noticed many alumni from her year, and even her current Harvard students, joining in the virtual conversation. “The Harvard community thrives on the resourcefulness of its members,” Martin said. “#virtualvisitas is a great example of that.”Kirkland resident Ibrahim Khan was in Los Angeles with some of his Harvard roommates, headed to the music festival Coachella and using Twitter to follow the news in Boston, when he read a tweet about #virtualvisitas.“Harvard 2017ers, I’m a junior in Kirkland and happy to answer any questions you have. I hope you are all staying safe,” Khan tweeted out.While the University has no plans to reschedule Visitas, Fitzsimmons said he would consider extending the acceptance deadline beyond May 1 for students who had planned to attend the weekend event. In addition, the University will continue to connect with undecided incoming freshmen via email, phone, and social media, he said, to help them in any way possible.“We will do whatever we can to help them in making their decision,” said Fitzsimmons.last_img read more

Exotic Christmas Gifts

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first_imgIf you’re shopping for a holiday gift plant, you’re bound to see some odd, exoticplants among your garden center offerings.Some may be growing on what looks like little stumps. Most have brightly colored leavesor peculiar flowers and thick, waxy leaves.They’re called bromeliads.”Bromeliaceae is a very large family of plants,” said Paul Thomas, ahorticulturist with the University of Georgia Extension Service. “They’re epiphytic,which means they grow on trees, usually in very tropical environments.”The bromeliads you’re apt to buy in stores aren’t Georgia products. They come fromSouth and Central America, from Peru and Chile up through Mexico.”Georgia has a native bromeliad,” Thomas said. “It’s called Spanishmoss, which is a Tillandsia plant. As you go further south into Florida, you’llfind many other Tillandsias.”Another famous bromeliad is the pineapple. That’s one of the biggest plants in thefamily, although there are a few bigger species.”So you have bromeliads that you eat, and you have some that can be used aspacking material,” Thomas said. “Another whole group is floriferous — they’regrown for their exotic flowers.”Among these plants, the ones you’ll find in stores this Christmas and throughout theyear, are Cryptomeria, which are sometimes called “Christmas stars” andother names. “They’re noted for their multicolored, flat, pineapple-likeleaves,” Thomas said. “They make a wonderful indoor ground cover and neat potplants.”One spectacular bromeliad is a Vriesia. “This plant has huge red bracts onthe flower scape,” he said. “It sends up what looks like a large, bright redsword, which opens up to reveal bright blue flowers.”Bromeliads come in countless shapes and sizes, from tiny things to giants. And thegreat thing about them, Thomas said, is “they’re all fairly easy to grow.”They grow best in medium light. So they do well in east- or west-facing windows. Andthey grow well under artificial light.”You can carry them outdoors in the summer, and they’ll bloom like crazy,”Thomas said.But remember, they’re epiphytes — they grow on other plants. “They like to bewatered, but they’re used to having the water run off,” he said. “You can growthem well in a pot in a regular potting mix, but you have to let the mix dry out from timeto time.”Or you can attach them to slabs of bark. “They’ll slowly root into the bark,”he said, “but you’ll have to water them more often.”A unique thing about watering bromeliads, Thomas said, is that their leaves arecomplete rosettes, forming perfect cups.”That’s how a tree dweller survives,” he said. “They’re used to catchingwater that way. So water the plant from top to bottom to keep adequate moisture in thosecups.”To keep the plant looking its best, you’ll need to give it a thorough shower everycouple of weeks or so.These plants don’t like a lot of fertilizer, though. Thomas’ rule-of-thumb is to dividethe label recommendations of your normal houseplant fertilizer by four.Bromeliads are annuals in Georgia. They’re not cold-tolerant. In south Florida, though,they keep growing as long as people take care of them.”You can have bromeliads that are 10 or 15 years old,” Thomas said, “ifyou bring them inside when it turns cool and keep them watered.”Bromeliads are resistant to most diseases, as long as you don’t let the roots getsaturated. They’re resistant to most insects, too.And even apartment dwellers who don’t have many windows can have big collections ofbromeliads.”Many of these plants are tiny,” Thomas said. “The entire plant may bethe size of your thumb. And they grow very slowly. So you can have a big collection ofbromeliads on a single window sill.”last_img read more

Welch announces staff changes

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first_imgUS Rep. Peter Welch announced Tuesday a set of staff transitions geared toward supporting his work on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, to which he was appointed in January.Welch hired Stephanie Krenrich as Senior Legislative Assistant with a focus on health, education, housing and the environment. Mary Sprayregen, who previously served as Welch s Business Liaison in his Vermont office, has joined the Congressman s Washington office as a Legislative Assistant with a focus on business, energy, telecommunications and appropriations. I am pleased to welcome Stephanie Krenrich to our team and Mary Sprayregen to our Washington office, Welch said. Stephanie has proven herself as an accomplished legislative assistant and brings a great deal of knowledge and experience to our office. Mary was an invaluable asset to our Vermont office and to the state s business community, and I am excited she will be joining our Washington team.Stephanie Krenrich (Senior Legislative Assistant), a six-year veteran of the House, brings extensive legislative experience to the Welch office. Krenrich previously served as Legislative Assistant for Rep. Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ) and for Rep. Lane Evans (D-Ill.). Before that, she served as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer for the Montana Legal Services Association in Helena. Krenrich graduated from New York University with a degree in politics and will graduate from Johns Hopkins University with an M.A. in government later this year.Mary Sprayregen (Legislative Assistant), a native of Charlotte, Vt., has worked in Congressman Welch s Vermont office as Business Liaison since January, 2007. Prior to that, Sprayregen served as Director of Government Affairs for the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce and GBIC. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Skidmore College with a B.A. in sociology and law, Sprayregen has also worked as a policy researcher evaluating Vermont s reparative probation program and as an English teacher in Italy.Source: Representative Welchlast_img read more

How Summit Credit Union is changing lives with its ‘Project Money’ program

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first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Many of us are constantly looking on how we can build a better financial foundation, get out of debt, or simply get a better handle on our finances. Where do you go for this guidance? Well, how about your credit union?Summit Credit Union is changing financial lives with its highly successful “Project Money” program for seven years, helping members find a firm footing financially through friendly competition. continue reading »last_img read more

Reform package of tourism laws adopted

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first_imgGET INVOLVED IN THE PUBLIC DEBATE ON THE MANNER AND CONDITIONS FOR OBTAINING CONCESSIONS ON TOURIST LAND IN CAMPSITES Cappelli also said that these laws are aimed at making tourist boards (TZ) financially self-sufficient and more involved in destination management. “This is one of the first steps to finally put everything in its place and to see if we manage destinations at all, if we do it well and how many tourists there are in a destination at all. An important role in this is taken over by the current CNTB Head Office, which is becoming practically a marketing agency, something like “Visit Britain”, a German tourist organization, etc. “said Cappelli. DRAFT PROPOSAL OF TOURIST LAW PACKAGES Cappelli: The three new tourism laws are a major reform and decentralizing step forward These are the final proposals of the law on tourist boards and the promotion of Croatian tourism, membership fees in tourist boards and the tourist tax, which the Government sent to Parliament today. Regarding the Law on Membership Fees in Tourist Boards, Minister Cappelli pointed out that the rate for calculating the membership fee was 28 to five, which relieved the economy of HRK 11 million. Also, 21 activities are exempt from paying that membership fee, while some new activities have been introduced, such as banks. “More will be encouraged through the fund for underdeveloped areas and the continent, for which 9 percent will be allocated compared to the previous 7,5 percent, and of these funds will be allocated to regional tourist boards that earn less than HRK 500 thousand of revenue per year, as a difference up to the amount of HRK 500 thousand. However, after the expiration of five years, the funds will be distributed to tourist boards and regional and local in these areas through a public tender”, Explained Cappelli, adding that he wants to equalize everything so that they can ‘start’ equally.The Law on Tourist Tax stipulates that in the future the amount will no longer be determined by a Government decree, but will be determined by county assemblies, and the Minister will prescribe only minimum and maximum amounts, for example from 10 to 15.”We have introduced a 2 percent novelty in both membership fees and tourist fees for projects and programs of joint tourist boards, and an important thing about the fee is the introduction of charging options for cruisers in maritime and inland waterway transport, but the decision is left to city councils , if they want they can importSaid Cappelli. Photo: Government of the Republic of Croatia At today’s 150th Session of the Government of the Republic of Croatia, the reform was adopted package of tourism laws. RELATED NEWS: The laws are expected to be on the parliamentary agenda as early as next week. The law on tourist land is coming soonHe also announced that a change was coming soon of the Law on Tourist Land, which is important for investments, as well as to prepare the development of a new strategy for the development of Croatian tourism from 2020 onwards, which, according to Cappelli, “this Government will pass the most important laws for tourism before the expiration of the mandate.” 20 years, to encourage further investment and get a stronger, better and more efficient system needed in tourism, ”concluded Cappelli. The three tourism laws that the Government sent to the Parliament today are a big reform and decentralizing step forward, because large funds and decision-making are left to cities and counties, said the Minister of Tourism. Gari Cappelli at a press conference after the Government session and added that the mentioned laws are reform and go for the improvement of the system of tourist boards and its harmonization with modern trends. He also pointed out that the law on tourist boards encourages the association of tourist boards, which is happening in the field even before the law is passed, for example in the Imotski region, and similar announcements are made from Gorski Kotar, Kvarner, Hvar, Makarska Riviera and elsewhere. is, according to him, proof that it is going in the right direction.last_img read more

Post-pandemic foreign policy must change, former minister says

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first_imgA former top diplomat has sparked a debate about the direction of Indonesian foreign policy as the rules-based international order comes under increasing pressure for its management of the pandemic and the ensuing economic crisis.Former foreign minister Hassan Wirajuda called on the nation to pivot away from multilateralism and focus its efforts on bilateral and regional diplomacy, after what he said was a lack of leadership by the United Nations and international agencies.Hassan’s appeal touches on criticism of the UN’s slow COVID-19 response, as the organization and its related bodies have been embroiled in the geopolitical rivalry between China and the United States. “The United Nations and international organizations are no longer effective,” Hassan declared as he criticized the World Health Organization for allowing an attack on its credibility.Read also: The strange war against the WHO amid its battle with COVID-19He said that over the past six months, the pandemic had managed to speed up the end of globalization, evident in the way countries were becoming more dependent on their own national responses and bilateral cooperation initiatives and less on the multilateral system.Hassan took Indonesia’s cooperation with South Korea on the production of face masks and personal protective equipment as an example of the current development. “Understanding the great changes in the global and regional landscape, both in geopolitical and geoeconomic [terms], it is necessary to refocus Indonesian diplomacy after the pandemic,” he said during an online discussion on Wednesday.Read also: Insight: COVID-19: The challenge to multilateralism and regionalismHassan said that while the 1945 Constitution maintained that Indonesia had to contribute to world peace, the nation should also be realistic about the fact that efforts to restructure the world order had not been successful.Indonesia’s foreign policy mission was formed on the basis of an excerpt from the Preamble of the Constitution, in which the formation of the government was partly predicated on the goal of establishing “a world order based on freedom, abiding peace and social justice”.Going forward, bilateral diplomacy should strive for tangible and measurable targets in order to strengthen “national post-pandemic independence” in a range of areas as new global trends emerge, said the former minister, who is credited with preparing the current cohort of senior Foreign Ministry officials.He also said that regional diplomacy was needed to help protect Indonesia “from our existential threat as a nation state” and that the nation’s diplomacy must be more grounded.Hassan’s criticism of the global order comes ahead of the UN’s 75th anniversary and amid a physical shutdown of the organization as a result of the pandemic. This has limited diplomatic efforts and helped embolden nations that are skeptical of the body’s professed multilateral ideals.Hasan’s comments also follow Indonesia’s latest forays into UN leadership. The country has secured a seat on the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and serves on the Security Council and the Human Rights Commission.Read also: Indonesia secures seat on United Nations Economic and Social CouncilOn many occasions, the Foreign Ministry, led by Retno Marsudi, has insisted upon the need to maintain the multilateral system to ensure global access to vaccines, medical supplies and equipment and to mitigate the economic impacts of the outbreak.Retno again defended multilateralism on Thursday at a virtual meeting between ASEAN and Russia, saying the global fight against COVID-19 should be seized as an opportunity to strengthen collaboration among countries.She raised the issue of eroding trust among nations and stressed the need for all parties to set aside their differences.“Indonesia wants to see multilateralism work in a more effective way – a multilateralism that puts forward collective interests and prevents the mighty from taking everything,” the minister said.Read also: Indonesia stresses need for multilateralism in ASEAN-Russia meetingSeparately, Deputy Foreign Minister Mahendra Siregar acknowledged growing concerns that the global supply chain was becoming too dependent on a very limited number of countries.Such dependency had become an unacceptable risk, he said, as the world had witnessed scarcity in medical supplies and equipment earlier this year because many of the raw materials for mass production came from only one or two countries.“This can be interpreted as a nationalist or protectionist attitude, but I see it as a consequence of, and the lessons learned from, what we have been through over the last few months,” Mahendra said during a public lecture on Wednesday.Indonesia recorded a record surge in COVID-19 cases on Thursday, with 1,331 new confirmed cases, a day after the country officially surpassed Singapore, in gross terms, with the highest number of recorded infections in Southeast Asia. Indonesia’s population is about 48 times larger than Singapore’s.Read also: Indonesia records another record number of new COVID-19 casesThe foreign service has been actively involved in global health initiatives and in forging bilateral deals, which observers say have helped ease the burden on the state’s pandemic response.“We see all of this disruption not as a source of nervousness but as an opportunity. As some wise people have said, ‘We should never waste a good crisis,’” Mahendra said.Topics :last_img read more

A mammoth sized mansion in Maudsland will go under the hammer

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first_imgMammoth mansionPOISED on a 4,736sq m block, this enormous Maudsland property captures hinterland views and has space for up to 10 cars. With a commanding presence in Maudsland’s new estate, Huntington Downs, the five-bedroom home was custom built in 2011 by builder Tony Trimarchi to use as his personal home. gcb realestate 20 Huntington Drive Maudsland 30 March 2017“The current owner has landscaped a lot of the sloping property and has created an outdoor entertaining area with a fire pit and timber decking so you can enjoy the views from the top,” Mr Contreras said.The property has a sustainable design with solar panels and a water tank.The master planned community is eight minutes from the motorway. 20 Huntington Drive MaudslandThe home at 20 Huntington Drive has high ceilings, concrete floors and a large open plan design.Daniel O’Halloran bought the property with his partner Yvonne Carberry in 2013.Platinum Properties Real Estate agent Antonio Contreras who is marketing the property describes the it as Maudsland’s trophy home. 20 Huntington Drive Maudsland“I have had a lot of interest from interstate buyers but predominantly Brisbane buyers with big families who are after rural living that is still convenient to town.“It is the best of both worlds with Hinterland but you’re only minutes from Helensvale.”The home includes a cabana, pool house and swimming pool.center_img 20 Huntington Drive Maudsland“There are only a small number of homes in the estate, it’s still a very new community but this home outshines most in the area,” Mr Contreras said.“It was built on a grand scale and bedrooms are larger than a regular home.”More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North9 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoMr Contreras said buyers were attracted to the average homes in the estate. 20 Huntington Drive Maudsland20 Huntington Drive Maudsland5 4 10Auction: April 9, 11amFeatures: Firepit, swimming pool and timber flooringArea: 4,736sq mAgents: Joe Farr and Antonio Contreras, Platinum Properties Real Estate, Runaway BayInspection: By appointmentlast_img read more

First oil flows from Hail field offshore Abu Dhabi

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first_imgSpanish oil and gas company Cepsa and Japanese petrochemicals firm Cosmo Oil have started oil production from the Hail oil field offshore Abu Dhabi. Hail oil field was put into production on Tuesday, November 7 in the Abu Dhabi Oil Company (ADOC) concession by Cepsa and Cosmo Oil, through the company Cosmo Abu Dhabi Energy Exploration & Production, which is one of ADOC’s shareholders with a 64.4% stake.Cepsa and Cosmo created Cosmo Abu Dhabi Energy Exploration & Production three years ago to operate in Abu Dhabi and look for new opportunities in the United Arab Emirates.Hail is the fourth offshore crude oil field to start production in the ADOC concession in addition to the Mubarraz field, Umm Al-Anbar field and Neewat Al- Ghalan fields. All of them are located in shallow waters to the West of Abu Dhabi and were put into production in 2017, 1973, 1989, and 1995, respectively.The Hail field will allow Cepsa to significantly increase its production. The Hail field is adjacent to the existing fields, making maximum use of existing facilities. It is located on an artificial island communicated via subsea pipeline to current production and export facilities on Mubarraz Island. The development also includes ten producing wells.The Hail oil field was acquired when the existing oil fields renewed their concessions for 30 years on December 12, 2012. After the acquisition of the concession, ADOC carried out the analysis process such as the 3D seismic survey and drilling of the appraisal wells, reclamation of the new artificial island and construction of facilities, as well as drilling new wells.Cepsa holds a 20% stake in Cosmo Abu Dhabi Energy Exploration & Production and the other 80% interest belongs to Cosmo Oil. Both Cepsa and Cosmo form part of Mubadala Investment Company’s portfolio (Cepsa 100% and Cosmo 20.8%).According to Cosmo’s statement on Wednesday, the production from the Hail field is the first oil field development in the Middle East by a Japanese operator since 2011.Cosmo added that Hail oil field production volume was estimated to be equivalent to that of the existing oil fields.last_img read more