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Clinical Director, Cancer Imaging Program

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first_imgThe Department of Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, inconjunction with the University of MarylandMarlene & Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center(UMGCCC) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine isrecruiting for an outstanding M.D. or M.D/Ph.D. cancer imagingspecialist (Associate to Full Professor level) who has an activefederally-funded research program to head the UMGCCC Cancer ImagingProgram. Primary appointment will be within the Department ofDiagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine.This Cancer Imaging Program is a newly formed developing programthat will complement five other well-established programs offeredunder the UMGCCC. The successful candidate is expected to have aproductive and funded research program focused on cancer imaging.Upon hire, in addition to establishing their own research program,the candidate is expected to participate in and initiate imagingrelated clinical trials, collaborate with researchers within theimaging program and other active programs within the UMGCCC, mentorstudents, post-doctoral associates and/or physician scientists,present their work at national meetings, and publish in high-impactjournals. The appointee will provide leadership to the CancerImaging Program and create an environment that fosterscollaborations between investigators from various cancer researchprograms and fosters translational clinical research. The incumbentcandidate along with his/her co-leader from basic sciences willwork closely with the Director and the Associate Director of UMGCCCto formulate organizational structure of the Cancer ImagingProgram. The position will also have some clinical and teachingresponsibilities and the successful candidate will need anunwavering commitment to clinical excellence, innovation, andeducation. ABR certification and the ability to obtain Marylandstate license are required. Competitive start-up and salary packagewill be provided and will be commensurate with experience.The successful candidate will join a rapidly growing researchprogram within the Department of Diagnostic Radiology & NuclearMedicine in various areas. These include molecular imaging,hyperpolarized MR imaging, MR guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS),interventional imaging and development of quantitative imagingmarkers. Clinical research is a main focus of the department withactive research in all divisions within radiology using state ofthe art imaging technologies. Recently thedepartment became the Focused Ultrasound Foundation Center ofExcellence based on significant contributions made towardstranslating MRgFUS to treat essential tremors, Parkinson’s disease,neuropathic pain and very recently were successful in creatingblood brain barrier disruption for delivering nanoparticles. Theclinical radiology program, particularly the neuro, chest, body andmusculoskeletal programs provides strong support for all clinicalresearch initiated within UMGCCC .Qualifications :For immediate consideration, please apply online and send a coverletter and a recent CV, including names and contact information ofthree references to the following link: Clinical Director, Cancerimaging ProgramFor additional questions after submitting application, please [email protected] is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Allqualified applicants will receive consideration for employmentwithout regard to sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race,color, religion, national origin, disability, protected Veteranstatus, age, or any other characteristic protected by law orpolicy. We value diversity and how it enriches our academic andscientific community and strive toward cultivating an inclusiveenvironment that supports all employees.last_img read more

Student Test Scores Drop In New ILEARN Exam

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first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Student Test Scores Drop In New ILEARN ExamAugust 26, 2019, By Brynna SentelTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS – The results of the ILEARN state standardized test have so shocked government leaders that they already are performing damage control.Gov. Eric Holcomb called on the Indiana General Assembly Monday to enact legislation that would spare schools and students from being evaluated on the standardized test results for at least another year.LEARN, the Indiana Learning Evaluation Assessment Readiness Network test which is a shorter rebranded version of the ISTEP+ test was administered to Indiana schools during the 2018-19 school year to students in the third to eighth grades. The results won’t be released to the public until next Wednesday.But they won’t be the kind of report card to boast about.“The results will show a decrease compared to the previously administered ISTEP+ test,” Holcomb said in a statement. “Since this is the first year of the ILEARN assessment, I will ask Superintendent (of Public Instruction) Jennifer McCormick to support my request that the General Assembly take action to hold schools harmless so the test scores do not have an adverse impact on teacher evaluations and schools’ letter grades for the 2018-19 school year.”McCormick later issued a statement saying that “we are proposing legislative action addressing the negative impact on educators, schools, districts, and communities.”Senate President Pro Tempore Rodric Bray, R-Martinsville and House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, both said in statements that they support giving the schools a year for adjustment.McCormick indicated the English and language arts scores, as well as math scores, were lower across the state.“The combination of the rigors associated with this newly-aligned college and career readiness assessment, national normative data and the defined established performance cuts all contributed to the lower performance levels,” McCormick said. “While frustrating, performance dips at some level were expected, as previously experienced in 2014-2015 with the onset of the then-newly implemented ISTEP+.”Keith Gambill, president of the Indiana State Teachers Association, called on lawmakers to pass the legislation Holcomb and McCormick are seeking at its November organizational meeting, usually a one-day event, rather than waiting for the legislative session that starts in January.But he also criticized the use of such testing to penalize schools and teachers.“Our students, teachers, and communities are much more than just a test score,” Gambill said. “We should not rely on these scores to label our schools and communities with a letter grade or negatively impact teachers’ evaluation and pay. ILEARN is yet another example of Indiana’s continued use of standardized tests and constant policy turmoil that harms students and discourages teachers to remain in the profession.”Rep. Bob Behning, the Indianapolis Republican who is chairman of the House Education Committee, said lawmakers “are taking a hard look at our overall state accountability system.”The priority, he said, is preparing students for “life after high school, whether they enter the workforce immediately or continue their education.”“We knew there would be an adjustment period as we transitioned from ISTEP+ to ILEARN,” he added. “While these results are not the ones we hoped for, the value of Hoosier students and teachers is not defined by test scores, but by the learning being accomplished in the classroom.”Democrats in the legislature agreed that these first ILEARN scores shouldn’t be used to judge schools, but said it’s just another reason why the legislature needs to rethink how much it meddles in school exams, as standardized testing has gone through numerous iterations in Indiana.House Minority Leader Phil GiaQuinta, D-Fort Wayne, called the test scores “a symptom of a larger problem.”“The bottom line is that Republicans have been running an education system in Indiana for over 10 years the doesn’t adequately pay our teachers, underfunds our traditional public schools and is failing to test our kids correctly,” he said.Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, D-Anderson, said that “this is a learning opportunity for lawmakers to understand how much pressure our teachers and students are facing to perform well on exams while wasting countless hours testing instead of investing in valuable learning moments.”FOOTNOTE: Brynna Sentel is a reporter at TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalists.last_img read more

California: bumper almond crop

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first_imgThe Californian almond crop for 2008/9 should produce 1.5m lbs of almond “meat” – the usable part of the nut, minus the shell – according to the United States Department of Agriculture’s statistics service. The forecast is up 3 percent from the May 7, 2008 subjective forecast of 1.460 billion pounds. The forecast is funded by the Almond Board of California. The average nut set per tree is 7,452, up 1 percent from the 2007 almond crop. Richard Waycott, the Almond Board of California’s President and CEO, commented: “This forecast continues the upward trend established in the 2006/2007 indicating the possibility of another record crop year. The California almond industry is well positioned to meet the ever-growing global demand for almonds.”last_img read more

Totting it up for tots

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first_imgThe pitter-patter of tiny feet is not everyone’s cup of tea. A mother let’s call her Jane Smith tells how her mums and toddlers group has boycotted their local branch of Starbucks in Hampshire after the manager was a little too honest.On the group’s final visit, the kids were playing among the empty sofas. “There was a man sitting nearby on his laptop who decided to shout out at us about our children, saying he was trying to work. My friend asked the manager: ’Do you have a problem with me bringing my children into your shop?’ and he said ’Yes’. We were absolutely stunned.”Starbucks’ head office is “terribly sorry” to hear of the incident, and insists that “children are always welcome”. The fact is that welcoming mothers with children, babies and toddlers can be a demanding business equipment has to be bought, menus have to be looked at, attitudes overhauled. So is it worth going after the junior customer?Many in the bakery sector, however, report that they do not make any special provisions for babies and children in eat-in areas, although they sell items such as cute biscuits targeted at children. Those that do offer child-friendly facilities include Scottish chain Aulds. Development director Fiona Phillips says: “We normally try to provide baby-changing facilities, one or two high-chairs per shop and have a children’s lunchbox on the menu.”But there is a problem with space, she says what is known as “pram jam”: “In small coffee shops, if the younger customer is actively encouraged, the pushchairs and prams and toy areas can take up considerable space and reduce that available for tables and chairs. To cater well for children, the coffee shop tends to need to be bigger.”Steven Halstead, who owns Norwich’s Cafe Morello with his wife Pam, is proud to fly the flag for child-friendliness. And his bank manager shares his pleasure. The café only has nine tables, but there is always room for a little one, even though parked buggies form a corral sometimes.Halstead says: “We love children, and we love them coming in here. It started with a high chair and a couple of booster seats, and we installed changing facilities a couple of years ago.”The café’s menu is all homemade and it offers child portions and drinks he says such as lukewarm hot chocolate which will not burn a child’s mouth. His staff will heat up bottles and babyfood without any mention of “health and safety” which is often cited in cafés to avoid the inconvenience of heating bottles.”The odd customer moans a bit if a baby is crying, but that happens very rarely. If anyone complains about breast-feeding I tell them to leave,” adds Halstead, whose company ethos comes from the heart.But being child-friendly has kept the business very profitable he says. The mothers with babies and older children tend to come in at quieter times, rather than the lunchtime peak, which allows a steady turnover throughout the day. And the café has built up a strong and loyal following in the area as the children grow up.Outside the café sector, and at the other end of the scale, successful 782 pub chain Wetherspoon’s growing success suggests it knows what it is doing. It is now targeting the younger market as it muscles in on traditional coffee shop territory. Wetherspoon’s offers a kid’s menu, designed by children’s nutrition pin-up Annabel Karmel, coffee and cakes, plus other requisites of child-friendliness high-chairs, changing facilities, children’s TV, drawing equipment.Paul Ettinger, business development director of Caffè Nero reports a similar position: “A lot of mums and babies’ clubs come into Caffè Nero and we make sure we have products that are suitable. There is an issue of space, however facilities for buggies for example. We have to make sure there is space for everyone.”Keeping it cleanStaying on top of cleanliness is also vital. A “what’s-on” website reviewing Jane Smith’s branch of Starbucks gives further insight. “The carpet area in particular is filthy and hosts a very large buggy brigade every morning,” says one review.”It has always been absolutely filthy, with food debris all over the floor in the sofa area and I’m sorry to have to say this it reeks of baby sick,” says another.A premises that encourages children will probably have to step up the cleaning schedule to make sure the environment stays pleasant for all. But for more traditional and old-fashioned businesses, currently happy in the comfort zone of serving old age pensioners, actually attracting a younger clientèle makes sense if the company is to survive and thrive. What cheaper way is there to do that than by installing a flipdown changing mat in the toilet and putting some high-chairs out?Cafés and eateries that pass muster soon gain a reputation spread by word-of-mouth among the local “mums Mafia” and, increasingly, on social networking sites and websites with local listings, or those such as mumsnet and netmums.The Jane Smith Starbucks story from earlier, for example, was subject of a lively debate on Facebook on the merits of petitions, boycotts and, perhaps, more “direct action”.Here’s the end of that story: “We’d been going there weekly for at least a year, mainly as we thought it was child-friendly. Also, we all bought drinks and cakes for all of us each time, spending £20-£30. This man was sat using their wifi with just one small drink. I couldn’t help but notice, over his shoulder, that he was actually shopping online, not working.”Maybe Jane should have asked the manager: “Do you have a problem with us putting £1,000+ a year off-peak revenue into your till?” The answer might have been quite different, something along the lines of, “Let me give the floor a quick clean.” Child-friendly checklist Enter mum, toddler in tow, scanning the café as a checklist plays out in her head: high-chair, check; space to park the buggy, check; any sign of a toilet with baby changing facilities and a buggy-wide gangway through the chairs? You may think that selling gingerbread men makes you child-friendly. Think again. Customers bringing babies and children into your premises are looking for a lot more than a few cute products for example:l space to park buggies perhaps an awning or a back room could be used?l high-chairs stackable ones that aren’t too heavy to drag round l baby-changing facilities and soap and paper tissues on handl bottle/food warming facilities motorway service stations offer microwaves, utensils and disposable bibsl a play area for toddlers also make sure the front door is secure so they cannot run onto the roadl toys, books and drawing equipment.l staff primed to help customers carrying trays if also pushing a buggy/praml good-quality/value food and drink for children organic super-premium products with super mark-ups fit that description with this demographicl clean premises the floor should be clean enough to eat off as that’s what may happenl a friendly atmosphere. Would your café cut the mustard? Mums on the net frank assessments of local café establishments may be found online, on blogs and review sites. How would you measure up against these comments?”Staff are always helpful and always offer to carry my tray to a table while I push the buggy.””I thought this place was dreadful! Full of OAPs tut-tutting at my three-year-old and his friend, who were not even running around or anything! Never going there again and the food’s totally overpriced!” “Table corners are perfect height for bumping toddlers heads, there are no high-chairs or toys or special menus or anything. I cannot remember seeing a baby-change in the one tiny toilet either.””I really like this café. It’s clean, bright and has good high-chairs. The staff are great and always carry the high-chair to the table for me and bring my coffee too!””So great for bigger meets, obviously nice surroundings, plenty of space for buggies, Hipp organic babyfood jars for sale (a bit pricey though). They also have baby beakers, bowls, spoons and a microwave out on a table for you to use to heat up baby food.”last_img read more

News story: Changes to the manual of trade marks practice

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first_imgUser feedback identified some errors, so we have corrected those errors and used the opportunity to make some further changes.The most noticeable change is the document’s structure. We have divided the examination practice content into four individual parts. They are as follows: None of the revisions establishes any major changes in examination practice and procedure.Later this year we will change the format of the Manual from a PDF format to a website-orientated format to match our Manual of Patent Practice and the Registered Designs Examination Practice Guide.The presentation of the Trade Marks manual on the website has changed. It has now been brought into line with the Design and Patent manuals as part of the government initiative to replace all pdf versions of such documents. The new format allows for easy searching of terms, something which was not possible using the pdf version.There are no changes to existing practice in this update, it is purely presentational.If you have any feedback please contact the manual editor. part A: Introduction part B: Alphabetical list of examination practice part C: Notifications part D: Overcoming objectionslast_img read more

‘Ellie the Elephant’ tackles COVID-19

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first_imgIn an effort to combat the discrimination that has intensified with COVID-19, educate children about the origin of the virus, and the precautionary measures necessary to stay safe, the Harvard Undergraduate UNICEF Club (HUNICEF) created an educational coloring book: “Ellie the Elephant.”By following Ellie’s day, children will learn about the origin of the virus, safety measures to abide by when outside, and new terminology about the pandemic. The coloring book is available to download for free here or you can order a printed copy for $5 (shipping included). All profits from selling printed copies will be donated to a COVID-relief fund.HUNICEF hopes to foster a public health aware generation and provide information about the best public health practices to keep our community and schools healthy and work toward a safer future, together. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Women Entrepreneurs Discuss Real Opportunities, Real Solutions, at DWEN Summit

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first_imgThis week, women entrepreneurs from around the world are gathering in San Francisco for the 8th annual Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network (DWEN) Summit. Representing 20 countries and more than 20 industries, these business leaders will share best practices, collaborate on business opportunities and formulate action plans for the advancement of women entrepreneurs.Dell is committed to advocating for entrepreneurs, the engine for innovation, economic growth and job creation globally. With this year’s Summit theme, “Real Opportunities, Real Solutions,” attendees will take deep dives on topics including emerging technology trends, alternative methods of finance and how to approach business in changing political landscapes.The festivities will kick off with a keynote by Nely Galan, entrepreneur, Emmy Award-winning producer and women’s empowerment advocate. More than 10 other influential women entrepreneurs will be onstage to share their advice and lessons learned. Some of these speakers include:Nicola Blackwood, former member of parliamentCarolyn Rodz, founder of Circular Board, a collaborative accelerator for growth-oriented female entrepreneursAmy Millman, president of Springboard Enterprises, a non-profit venture catalyst for women-led companiesEileen Gittins, CEO and co-founder of Bossygrl, a starter kit for female entrepreneurs, enabling women of all ages to create and grow real businesses, via their phonesMichele Perras, director of global ecosystem at Pivotal and advisor and mentor at Alchemist Accelerator, where she works with early-stage B2B/SaaS startupsLeah Busque, co-founder, executive chairwoman and former CEO of TaskRabbit, which was valued at over $100 millionAnd many more passionate women entrepreneursFostering a powerful community of women entrepreneurs and leaders starts with our girls, so we are thrilled to bring back the DWEN Girls’ Track developed for ages 12-16. Few programs today equip girls with the skills to pursue their career interests and passions. This is especially true when it comes to Science, Engineering, Math and Technology (STEM) – fields often dominated by males and now critical to building a successful business. As DWEN connects female entrepreneurs with networks, sources of capital, knowledge and technology, the Girls’ Track invests in girls so that their path to entrepreneurship can be a guided one.WE Cities 2017 Ranks Top 50 Cities for Women EntrepreneursAt DWEN Summit, we’ll be releasing results from our 2017 Women Entrepreneur Cities Index (WE Cities) – a unique global study commissioned by Dell to assess and compare cities around the world in terms of their ability to attract and foster high-impact women entrepreneurs.This year’s WE Cities ranks the top 50 cities – expanding on last year’s count of 25 – for women entrepreneurs based on five key pillars: market, culture, capital, talent and technology. This analysis provides data-driven research and clear calls to action to improve the landscape for women entrepreneurs, which in turn dramatically lifts a city’s economic prospects. For further analysis of results, check out the full report.Since its inception, DWEN has fostered a community of like-minded women who are looking for opportunities to grow their businesses. Every year, I am so inspired by the women (and girls!) attending DWEN Summit, and I expect this year will be no different as we welcome our largest and most diverse group yet. You can follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #DWEN, or by following @DellInnovators.Video highlights from the 2017 DWEN Summit are now available to watch here:last_img read more

Measure would help state attorneys, PDs with loans

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first_img Measure would help state attorneys, PDs with loans Associate Editor A few weeks ago, a young attorney came to Sen. Skip Campbell’s office and begged for a job. He made only $28,000 and had $135,000 in student loans hanging over his head.“Unfortunately, I didn’t have a job to offer him,” said Campbell, D-Tamarac.But what Campbell offered the Senate Committee on the Judiciary was SB 250, which would create a student loan repayment program for certain assistant state attorneys and assistant public defenders.Campbell called it a good bill that provides an incentive for young lawyers to stay in their jobs longer than three years. The bill passed out of the committee unanimously, even though Sen. Rod Smith, D-Gainesville, chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Article V Implementation and the Judiciary, predicted it will become a bill without funding because of the lean budget.The proposed legislation provides that once an assistant state attorney or assistant public defender serves in that job for three years, the Justice Administrative Commission would make yearly payments of $3,000 to the student loan lender on behalf of the attorney. When an attorney completes six years of continuous service, the payment amount would be increased to $5,000. Student loan assistance would end when the loan is paid off, when the attorney completes 12 years of continuous service, or when payments made on behalf of the attorney equal $44,000.According to Senate Judiciary staff, an in-state student at Florida State University College of Law pays $5,393 a year; an out-of-state student pays $19,624 a year. FSU students are allowed to borrow as much as $18,500 per academic year, or $55,000 for the three-year law school program, according to the FSU Financial Aid Office.Law school tuition takes a giant leap at private schools, such as Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad School of Law, where tuition is $22,500 each year for a full-time student.In the end, many law school graduates simply can’t afford to work for the state trial courts.“On behalf of the Florida Public Defender Association, we very much support this bill,” said Second Circuit Public Defender Nancy Daniels. “It is a very hard reality in our offices that we lose our attorneys.”Starting salaries for assistant public defenders and assistant state attorneys were increased to $37,566 beginning December 1, 2003.“We are able to recruit these days with the starting salaries,” Daniels said, “But at the two-year mark, when their loans build up and can’t be consolidated, we lose our attorneys very regularly. Both state attorneys and public defenders suffer with very severe turnover problems. We think this would help us with recruitment and turnover. Even if the bill is passed as a substantive bill this year would be helpful, and we could tell our recruits that it is there and maybe will be funded in the future.”Smith said: “The issue, as you know, is if we fund this and it takes $600,000, that is $600,000 out of your workload. Which would you choose?”“We’d rather have both,” Daniels said with smile.“Which one would you choose?” pressed the senator and former state attorney of the Eighth Judicial Circuit.“We understand the issue there,” Daniels answered.Campbell tried to put a positive spin on the economic forecast.“The economy is heating up, according to the papers. I know the Revenue Estimating Conference says we have $500,000 more than we thought. If we can make it an unfunded law, when we have the funds, we can kick it in. I feel strongly that the third branch of government is underfunded,” Campbell said.“I hope the legislature will wake up that there are three equal branches and they all need to be funded. Maybe the prediction of Sen. Smith will not come true, and we will have a few extra bucks to help these attorneys.”Campbell said he wanted to include trial staff attorneys in the bill, as well, but those positions (which pay an annual minimum salary of $44,328) are funded through a different source — the Office of State Courts Administrator.“To keep this bill as clean as we can, we have to remove them,” Campbell said. “I will tell staff attorneys and guardian ad litem attorneys that I will work to get them the same type of assistance, hopefully, later in the process. But we can’t do it in this bill.”Sen. Dave Aronberg, D-Greenacres, asked about including assistant attorneys general, too.“I probably got 500 e-mails from lawyers who want to be included,” Campbell said. “But AGs aren’t funded through the same source.”Smith said while he supports the bill, he knows the state can’t afford it.“As for putting in the AGs, it doesn’t matter, because we aren’t going to fund it anyway,” Smith said. January 15, 2004 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Measure would help state attorneys, PDs with loanslast_img read more

CUNA Task Force Chair explains unified structure

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first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Tina OremAfter CUNA’s announcement May 6 that it may rebrand and restructure itself, Suncoast CEO Tom Dorety, who is the chairman of CUNA’s System Structure and Governance Task Force, shared more details with CU Times about how the change could affect agreements with affiliate leagues, create more league accountability, establish an advocacy fund and even rebrand leagues.The trade association is considering changing its name to America’s Credit Unions, retaining credit unions’ league choice and changing its governance structure, including reducing the size of the CUNA board. continue reading »last_img read more

Police investigating incident on West Side of Binghamton

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first_imgStay with 12 News as we follow this developing story. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Binghamton Police Department is investigating an incident that occurred on the West Side of the city Friday morning. The Binghamton Police Department tells 12 News more information will be released soon.last_img

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