VTS to acquire office-tracking app for about $100M

VTS to acquire office-tracking app for about $100M

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first_imgVTS CEO Nick Romito and Rise Buildings CEO Prasan Kale (VTS, Rise Buildings)As companies consider how they can safely bring employees back to offices, mobile apps that can monitor worker movements — and thus ensure they’re abiding by Covid-19 safety protocols — are growing in popularity.One such app, Rise Buildings, is set to be acquired by New York startup VTS for around $100 million, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources familiar with the transaction. Rise is a Chicago-based startup that has a mobile app used in approximately 350 buildings totaling over 130 million square feet of office space.Its CEO, Prasan Kale, said that individual data is also kept anonymous, and that employees can opt out of using it.A similar app, Toronto-based Lane, is used in more than 300 buildings in eight countries. It launched its first funding round in May, which raised $10 million. The company says that it’s now being used by big office landlords, including Brookfield Office Properties, Oxford Properties and Tishman Studio.ADVERTISEMENTEmployers can use these apps to see if a conference room is too crowded or to see how many people are sitting in a particular space, according to the report. They can also be used to report issues to building management.For landlords, the apps provide an opportunity to see how tenants are using their buildings, including anticipating which ones may be bringing in additional employees or scaling down.Nick Romito, the CEO of VTS, told the publication that his firm has been watching the nascent office app category since before the pandemic, and now sees it as an asset for landlords.“In the return-to-work every owner has to make sure their tenants know what’s going on,” he said.[WSJ] — Keith Larsen Tags Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Commercial Real Estateoffice marketProptechlast_img read more

The influence of seasonal variation, diet and physical activity on Ssrum lipids in young men in Antarctica

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first_imgThe long-term effects of diet, physical activity and seasonal variation on serum lipids have been studied over a period of one year (1961) in members of the British and South African Antarctic Surveys based at Halley Bay (75.30°S) and Sanae (70.30°S). The duration of the study spanned roughly three seasons: (1) February to April (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –12 to –21°c., strenuous activity and average daily food intake of 3,850 calories; (2) April to September (winter) with polar night and outside temperatures ranging from –23 to –35°c., minimal activity and a food intake of 3,363 calories; and (3) September to January (summer) with daylight and outside temperatures ranging from –6 to –14°c., strenuous activity (including sledging journeys) and food intake of 3,663 calories. Seasonal changes in serum total cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride levels were minimal although physical activity and dietary intake showed considerable variation; the latter factors apparently balancing each other. The changes in the alpha- and beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were significant. In winter beta-lipoprotein cholesterol levels rose significantly while alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol levels fell significantly. Similar significant changes were shown after sledging journeys; increased activity and energy expenditure resulting in decreased beta-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration with a corresponding increase in alpha-lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. One month after the sledging journeys, the levels had returned to those which existed before sledging. Studies with subjects spending their second year in the polar regions showed attenuation of all lipid parameters investigated.last_img read more

Tests of Antarctic soils for insect parasitic nematodes

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first_imgNematodes of the families Heterorhabditidae and Steinernematidae are obligate parasites of a wide range of insects (Poinar 1979). The third stage juvenile of these nematodes is a non-feeding infective form which carries symbiotic insect-pathogenic bacteria (Xenorhabdus spp.) in its intestine. Under favourable conditions the juveniles can survive for months in the soil. They are attracted to and enter insects. After invading the haemocoel they release the symbiont. The bacteria multiply, kill the host by septicaemia, and provide suitable conditions for nematode growth and reproduction. After one to two weeks, the newly formed infective juveniles leave the cadaver and seek new hosts.last_img read more

Rock moisture data from Livingston Island (maritime antarctic) and implications for weathering processes

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first_imgRock moisture content was determined for rock samples on different aspects of rock outcrops on Livingston Island during a summer season. As a result of the dominant rainbearing northerly winds the southern aspect usually has rock moisture levels lower than the northern. The southern aspect, however, experiences high rock moisture levels during periods of snowmelt; snow accumulates on the southern, lee-side of the rock outcrops. Wetting and drying events are more frequent on the northern exposure, although not as common as at a site open through the full 360°, while the southern aspect tends to experience continuous, low moisture levels with infrequent dry events. Contrary to earlier suggestions, freeze–thaw weathering does not appear to be a major factor during the summer. Although rock moisture levels are conducive to freeze–thaw, rock temperatures rarely go below 0°C. Rather, it appears that weathering due to wetting and drying may be more common on the northern aspects than was previously thought while chemical weathering is active on southerly aspects. Rock moisture levels may support rock damage due to segregation ice during the winter freeze when the rate of freezing is slowed by the overlying snow cover.last_img read more

Distribution of foraging by female Antarctic fur seals

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first_imgThe study examined the distribution of critical habitat for foraging by female Antarctic fur seals breeding at the island of South Georgia. Bathymetric features of the continental shelf around the island of South Georgia were an important indicator for the localisation of foraging. This pattern was consistent among years of different prey availability. Lactating females were constrained to forage mainly within 100 km of the location at which the offspring was being raised. When this constraint was removed at the end of lactation, females foraged to much greater ranges and dispersed to specific regions of the continental shelf east of Patagonia (>1000 km) and to the northern edge of the Antarctic pack ice (500 km). The empirical distribution of foraging during the breeding season was used to develop a function that described the foraging distribution for the whole breeding population of females. The result was consistent with past observations from ship-based surveys and it allowed estimation of the spatial impact of breeding female fur seals on krill at South Georgia. This suggested that, in extreme cases and assuming that krill influx is limited, female fur seals could eat most of the krill present in some regions where they forage intensively. However, mean consumption was about one-tenth of the mean density of krill.last_img read more

Algophagus mites (Astigmata: Algophagidae) from the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands: habitat-related morphology and taxonomic descriptions

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first_imgFive populations of habitat-specific, morphologically distinct Algophagus mites (Astigmata: Algophagidae) were found to occur on the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward islands. Although these mites did not differ among themselves with respect to idiosomal setal characteristics, which were also similar to those of known sub-Antarctic Algophagus taxa, morphometric analyses revealed leg and idiosomal size differences. In addition to morphometric differences, leg setal positions and porose axillary organ structure, indicated that the morphotypes were taxonomically discrete. The taxa were found to include the known A. antarcticus Hughes, 1955, A. laticollaris Fain, 1974 (new status), a sub-species of A. semicollaris Fain, 1974, and two new species, A. brachytarsus sp. nov. and A. macrolithus sp. nov. With the exception of A. semicollaris, the taxa are described or redescribed in this paper. Morphological features of the females in particular, and notably leg proportions, claw dimensions, and apodeme positions, corroborate discrete terrestrial (A. brachytarsus and A. macrolithus) and aquatic forms (A. antarcticus, A. laticollaris, and A. semicollaris), and vary in a manner suggesting a functional relationship to habitat occupation by the various taxa.last_img read more

An investigation of avoidance by Antarctic krill of RRS James Clark Ross using the Autosub-2 autonomous underwater vehicle

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first_imgThe autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Autosub-2 was deployed on eight missions ahead of RRS James Clark Ross in the northern Weddell Sea and in the Bransfield Strait, Southern Ocean, to assess avoidance of the research vessel by Antarctic krill Euphausia superba. The AUV was equipped with the same type of scientific echosounder as the research vessel (Simrad EK500 operating at 38 and 120 kHz) and measured the density of krill along transect acoustically (g m(-2) wet mass) prior to the ship’s arrival. We hypothesised that if krill avoided the ship, perhaps in response to radiated noise, then the ship should detect less krill than the AUV which is known to have much lower noise levels than the ship. We were unable to detect any significant difference between the density of krill detected by the ship or the AUV, either at the transect level or at finer scales within transects. We conclude, therefore, that avoidance by krill of RRS James Clark Ross will not significantly bias acoustic estimates of krill abundance by this vessel.last_img read more

Combined morphological and molecular analysis of individual nematodes through short-term preservation in formalin

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first_imgSmall metazoans such as marine nematodes are increasingly identified using both molecular and morphological techniques. Formalin is the preferred fixative for morphological analysis but specimens become unsuitable for molecular study due to formalin-induced modification of DNA. Nematodes fixed in ethanol work well for molecular studies but become unsuitable for taxonomy due to shrinkage. Here we show for the first time that formalin can be used as a short-term fixative (≤ 7 days) for marine nematodes, allowing both morphological and molecular work to be conducted on the same individual. No sequence ambiguities were detected in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) following short-term formalin preservation.last_img read more

Strong site-fidelity increases vulnerability of common bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus in a mass tourism destination in the western Mediterranean Sea

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first_imgThe local population of common bottlenose dolphin in the Balearic Islands coastal waters, a mass tourism destination in the western Mediterranean subject to increasing anthropogenic pressures, was monitored over a three-year period. Photo-identification surveys provided a relatively small population estimate, even though the islands are considered to be a hotspot for the species in the Mediterranean. Dolphins showed strong site-fidelity and relatively limited mobility across the archipelago, which makes them highly dependent on waters which are severely affected by overfishing, habitat degradation and boat disturbance resulting from a continuously-growing tourism and shipping industry. Ecosystem-based management actions are urgently needed to ensure the conservation of this fragile population of bottlenose dolphins. Conservation measures should be developed within the already-existing political and legal marine biodiversity conservation framework and in collaboration with local authorities and stakeholders.last_img read more

Jackson’s 19 pts lead GCU past Utah Valley in WAC opener

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first_imgGrand Canyon (8-6) closed out the first half with a 12-4 run in the last 5½ minutes to lead 36-27 at the break. Connor MacDougall made a layup with 14:10 to go and Utah Valley came as close as 42-40 before Lever converted a 3-point play. McDougall added a pair of free throws later to reduce the Wolverines’ deficit to 49-48 but they’d never get closer. January 3, 2019 /Sports News – Local Jackson’s 19 pts lead GCU past Utah Valley in WAC opener Carlos Johnson added 10 points for the Lopes. Both teams struggled shooting from the field (each were 38 percent) but made up for it at the foul line; Utah Valley 15 of 16 and GCU 19 of 24. Written by Benjamin Nakwaasah scored 15 for Utah Valley (11-5) and Baylee Steele scored 12. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPHOENIX (AP) — Matt Jackson scored 19 points and Alessandro Lever scored 14 and Grand Canyon beat Utah Valley 71-60 in a Western Athletic Conference opener for both teams Thursday night. Associated Presslast_img read more

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