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Witness testifies to seeing perpetrators with murder weapon

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first_imgAs the murder trial into the death of Antonio Isles continues, one witness has testified to seeing the deceased being beaten by several persons using a piece of wood.Two persons are currently before Justice Navindra Singh and a 12-member jury charged with the murder of Isles, 40, who was a seaman and who resided at Pike Street, Kitty, Georgetown. Isles was beaten to death by several persons at Pike Street, Kitty.Kevin Washington, 18, and Dennecia Halley, 15, are both facing the murder charge which read that between March 1 and 3, 2013, they murdered Isles. They duo were juveniles at the time of the alleged murder – Halley was 12 years old and Washington was 15 years old.According to the Police report, on March 1, 2013, the deceased was beaten by several persons at Pike Street. He was admitted to the Georgetown Public Hospital where he subsequently succumbed to his injuries.An autopsy performed by State Pathologist, Dr Nehaul Singh revealed that Isles died as a result of a fractured skull.The case is being prosecuted by State Prosecutor Michael Shahoud in association with Prosecutor Orinthia Schmidt. Washington and Halley are being represented by Attorneys Peter Hugh and Dexter Todd respectively.On Wednesday, the Prosecutors continued to present their case and called an eyewitness to the stand who testified that she saw several persons attacking the deceased. She also related that one of the perpetrators was using a large piece of lumber to hit the seaman about his body. The prosecutors are expected to present more witnesses today.last_img read more

Nigeria’s Presidential Commission on Small Arms on Learning Visit to Liberia

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first_imgLiNCSA vice chairperson Bennietta T. Jarbo (R), Chairman Fromayan and retired General of the Nigerian Army, Major Olayinka Akinyemi Oshinowo alongside other delegates.-Nigeria hopes to Learn from Liberia’s experienceA 5-man delegation from the office of Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, currently serving as the nucleus of the proposed Nigeria National Commission on Small Arms and Light Weapons, arrived in the country over the weekend for a week long working and experiential learning visit with its counterpart, the Liberia National Commission on Small Arms and Light Weapons (LiCNSA).James M. Fromayan, chairman of LiNCSA, who spoke to journalists at a press conference in Monrovia yesterday, said the purpose of the delegation’s visit is to do a week long case study that will enable them to transition from a presidential committee on small arms to a national commission on small arms.Chairman Fromayan said as the Nigerian government tries to comply with the ECOWAS convention, which he said aims to establish a national structure that will oversee the management of small arms as regards the proliferation, prevention and eradication of light weapons in that country and the region, they saw it fit to visit Liberia to use it as a case study.According to Fromayan, Liberia, Ivory Coast and Ghana have made significant progress with respect to the standards set by ECOWAS, and with Liberia being one of the countries far ahead in this regard, the Nigerian government considered it prudent to come to Liberia to do a case study, he emphasized.He said over the years Liberia has established a National Commission on Small Arms and has been working very hard to maintain its status by putting in place proper systems and working with national security agencies to ensure that small arms within the region are registered and tracked accordingly.Fromayan re-emphasized that Ghana and Ivory Coast have also made significant progress as well.He said the Nigerian government has a presidential committee on small arms (PRESSCOM) which is in transition to becoming a functional and fully fledged commission. And because Nigeria is determined to make sure that they establish such a body, they decided to come to Liberia, Fromayan declared.“While they are here they will be visiting some key security institutions and some personalities within our society,” he said.He said during the week-long tour Liberia will share experience with their Nigeria counterparts to provide the necessary technical knowledge that will enable them form a full commission on small arms.Meanwhile, a retired General of the Nigerian Army, Olayinka Akinyemi Oshinowo, who is heading the five-man delegation, lauded the government of government for its efforts to successfully establish a capable commission.General Oshinowo said he was so impressed with the level of work being done by LiNCSA and based on that it was important for them to visit Liberia to understand the technical aspects on how Liberia has made such significant progress in the prevention of the proliferation of small arms that Nigeria can learn from and adopt.“We actually choose to come to Liberia because we knew that Liberia has been through bad times before in terms of arms circulation during the country’s civil conflict and now is a time we must start learning from Liberia.“We are here to know the processes and the challenges you went through and the prospects, and how we will be able to interface with the government and other international organizations in the process of carrying out our assignments,” he said.Oshinowo also stated that small arms and light weapons are like weapons of mass destruction, “because a single arm can create a lot of problems and as such we need to make sure that we get these out of the region. I hope that for this one week that we are going to stay here, there will be a lot that will be learned.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

US funds $500,000 project to promote transparency in extractive sectors

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first_imgThe United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has funded an Extractive Industries Transparency Project, expected to aid in the proper management and operations of the entire extractive industry. This initiative, pegged at a whopping US$500,000, would have birthed after partnerships from the Guyana Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) Secretariat, the Multi-Stakeholder Group and the industry and civil societies. Expected to commence in September 2020, the entire programme will be implemented through the Pan American Development Foundation (PADF).In a statement issued by the US Embassy in Georgetown, it was stated that efforts behind this project are linked to building capacity for administration and management of these resources and filling the gaps which currently exist.“Programme support will also address required changes in data collection, monitoring and reporting systems that support Guyana’s attainment of the EITI standard. Activities will include streamlining systematic public disclosure of data from the oil, gas, mining, forestry and fishery sectors, and raising awareness among citizens about the importance of transparency and accountability in the extractives sector”.According to USAID, the discovery of oil heightens the need for such initiative, in ensuring accountability and responsible management.“The discovery of vast offshore oil reserves in 2017 constituted a milestone for Guyana’s economic prospects and is expected to rapidly propel Guyana’s economy upward. During this transition period, transparency, accountability and good governance will determine Guyana’s ability to responsibly manage its extractive resources and ensure revenues benefit the Guyanese people, and this programme supports attainment of these standards”.The EITI is a global standard for the good governance of oil, gas and mineral resources. Guyana will be producing first oil in a matter of months, making this a crucial project at this time.The country has been EITI compliant since 2017 and its first report was submitted in April this year ahead of the deadline that was set. In the report, it was revealed that the extractive industry in Guyana, particularly gold mining, has contributed to 65.1 per cent of Guyana’s total exports for 2017.According to the report, total revenues from the sector in the 2017 fiscal year amounted to $20.8 billion. The Guyana Gold Board, to which gold declarations are made, accounted for 33 per cent of this revenue. This is followed by the Guyana Revenue Authority, 32 per cent and the Ministry of Finance, 18 per cent.Gold and other minerals contributed $17.4 billion or 84 per cent of revenue from the extractive industries. On the other hand, oil and gas contributed $2.8 billion or 14 per cent. Bauxite, one of Guyana’s oldest industries, contributed $479 million or 2 per cent.The extractive industries’ contribution to exports has a dollar value of 193.2 billion. Besides the sector’s contribution to exports, it contributed 9.3 per cent to total Government revenues and 4.2 per cent to Guyana’s total employment. Its contribution to Guyana’s overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 20 per cent.The document also consisted of a number of recommendations inked by the crafters, one of which called for an independent audit for all financial data presented in the extractive sector.It stated that routine disclosure of the data required by the EITI Standard and the financial data should be subjected to “credible, independent audit, applying international standards”. This was given from the fact that while state agencies provided requisite data, it was not independently audited, as stated in the EITI standard.Adding to that, the report contended that much of the data on the number of revenues collected or budgetary allocations were not electronically preserved. As such, if total transparency is to be addressed, systems would have to be implemented to change the format of the data.One of the key ideas was to develop an EITI database within Government agencies to enhance the management information systems. These agencies included the Guyana Revenue Authority, the Guyana Gold Board, the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission, the National Insurance Scheme, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Finance Ministry.last_img read more

Father stabs son to death

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first_imgAn argument between family members turned deadly on Saturday evening when a father stabbed his son to death.Dead is Satesh Kevin Sookdeo of Lot 217 Fifth Street, Foulis, East Coast Demerara.Reports are at about 20:35h, the 44-year-old man and his wife had an argument when he grabbed her by the neck and began choking her. Seeing what was happening to his mother the 21-year-old and another sibling intervened, but this angered the father, who broke a louvre pane and stabbed his son to his chest.Neighbours rushed to the family’s aid after hearing screams but by then the younger Sookdeo had already died. The Police were called, and the father was taken into custody.The 21-year-old was taken to the Georgetown Public Hospital where he was pronounced dead. His body is at the GPHC mortuary awaiting a post-mortem examination. He was student at the Government Technical Institute pursuing the refrigeration technician course.An investigation has been launched.last_img read more

Beltran to coach Lancers

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first_imgLa Serna High School named as its new football coach Friday, keeping the selection in the family. Beltran served seven years as an assistant coach for Ken LaVigne, who resigned after last season. Beltran, 42, coached running backs last year but also has coached special teams, linebackers and defensive ends. This will be his first head-coaching position. “He really impressed the panel involved in the interview process,” Lancers athletic director Steve Hemenway said. “We know that Ken laid an excellent foundation for turning out fine young men, and we feel coach Beltran will continue that process. “(Beltran) is extremely excited about the opportunity and is anxious to continue building the program.” Beltran, also a special-education teacher at the school, said his goals are to “make the Lancers competitive every year and to go as far as possible in the playoffs.” “I know that coach LaVigne did a good job and he is a tough act to follow,” Beltran said Friday. “There will be some deviation in terms of Xs and Os, but we will do a lot of what he did program-wise and I intend to build on what he started.” Beltran, selected from a pool of 26 applicants, said his philosophy involves playing good hard-nosed football, but that doesn’t mean the Lancers intend to just run the ball. center_img “We’ll evaluate our strength and weaknesses and adjust,” Beltran said. “We’ll do what the talent dictates we can do.” Beltran said that building his staff is a work in progress. Margarito Beltran roger.murray@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3046. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Study: Mail delivery improved

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first_imgWASHINGTON – Chronic mail delays in Los Angeles have declined over the past year, but millions of letters and magazines continue to arrive late, a new federal audit has found. A three-month investigation by the Inspector General of the U.S. Postal Service concluded that the Los Angeles Processing and Distribution Center has slashed backlogs by more than half – particularly for first-class, priority mail and packages. But while auditors praised the facility for “significant improvements,” they also called for action in fixing the still-plagued standard mail and periodical deliveries. “Improvements were still necessary in the timely processing of these types of mail,” investigators wrote, noting that 1 million periodicals and 9.2 million pieces of mail were delivered late in July 2006 alone. Margarita Lara, a mail supervisor at the Los Angeles Unified School District, also said she has not noticed any improvements. “We’re having a lot of problems with delivery time,” Lara said. “Our main problems are our payroll. Recently it wasn’t getting to people for a week.” According to auditors, the delays were at their worst from July 2005 to May 2006. Investigators primarily blamed the closing of a Marina Del Rey processing center that displaced workers and created an overflow of mail to the Los Angeles center. The other culprit was retrofitting of mail-sorting machines that caused machines to be taken out of service. The retrofitting was finished in July. By August, investigators said delays in delivery of priority mail and packages had been eradicated entirely, and the customer service district “met or exceeded national averages for service standards.” Periodicals, meanwhile, experienced a 77 percent decline in delays, while standard-mail delays dipped only 34 percent. As of August, 5.4 million pieces of mail in L.A. arrived late to their destinations. The facility also has appointed a new plant manager and created a new system to report potential delays and take action quickly – actions auditors said should reduce delayed mail. But Kaye said she recently mailed a letter to a friend in Pittsburgh and it took five days. “Come on, five days?” she said. “A horse could have gone faster.” lisa.friedman@langnews.com (202) 662-8731160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The report came after months of complaints from local residents and demands for action by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles. On Wednesday, Waxman said he remains concerned about the quality of mail service. “While USPS has tried to be responsive, I continue to hear that mail service to both homes and offices is poor in portions of my congressional district,” Waxman said. Loretta Kaye of Tarzana said she has experienced mail delays for more than a year and has not seen any improvement like auditors reported. “I get people’s tax returns from Ventura Boulevard in Encino,” Kaye said. “My impression is that it’s gotten worse. “Why do I get people’s mail who don’t even live near me? And it gets kind of ridiculous that we have to keep calling (and saying), `Where’s my mail?”‘ last_img

“We were robbed!” Panama World Cup team hotel raided during Oslo match

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first_imgPolice say objects worth around 53,000 euros ($62,000) were taken from three rooms in a downtown Oslo hotel, explaining thieves are thought to have used an old magnetic room key or a stolen one and that video footage would be examined.Police spokeswoman Aslaug Rohne told AFP the robbery probably took place at the same time as Panama were being beaten by Norway on Wednesday in a match that ended 1-0.Panama will make their World Cup debut in Russia, where the central Americans will face England, Belgium and Tunisia in Group G.Panama kick off their campaign against Belgium in Sochi on June 18, the same day group G opponents Tunisia host England0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Norway’s Joshua King scoring against Panama, whose hotel rooms were robbed on Wednesday during the game © NTB Scanpix/AFP / Hagan, FredrikOSLO, Norway, Jun 7 – At around the time that World Cup minnows Panama were playing Norway this week, thieves were busy rifling their Oslo hotel rooms, police told AFP on Thursday.The Panamanian football federation tweeted: “Three #Panamayor hotel rooms were robbed in Oslo, Norway. Norwegian police are at the scene looking for clues.”last_img read more

ASSESSMENT OF DONEGAL CHEMICAL DUMPSITES NEEDED BEFORE LIVES LOST – CLAIM

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first_imgCouncillor John Shéamais Ó Fearraigh has demanded that the Government commission an immediate and thorough risk assessment report into chemical munitions’ dumpsites located off the Donegal Coast.Location of known chemical munitions dumpsites (Red Stars) off the Donegal Coast.)Councillor Ó Fearraigh, who earlier this month raised the issue in a motion put before Donegal County Council, says that the Government must now take urgent action and investigate these sites as they could pose a very real and substantive risk to the public.Cllr Ó Fearraigh said “Earlier this month, following concerns from local residents in the west of the county about this issue, I put forward a motion before Donegal County Council in which I called on the Department of the Marine to investigate claims that hundreds of barrels containing potentially toxic and hazardous material lie dumped just a few miles off the coast of Donegal.” “Past investigations by intergovernmental organisations and research agencies have confirmed that sites containing such material do in fact exist and have their origins dating back as far as the First World War.”“A report compiled in 2010 by the OSPAR Commission into past dumping at sea of chemical weapons and munitions, explicitly states that there are in excess of 150 known dumping locations throughout the convention area of which Ireland is a contracted party.”He added that while many of these dump sites contain conventional weaponry, some have been found to hold chemical munitions with the report finding that five such dumping sites have been identified off the Donegal coast.“According to the report, marine dumped chemical munitions pose a very real and substantive risk to life, particularly if it’s found that such weapons contain substances such as mustard agent or phosphorus which are both strongly mutagenic and carcinogenic.” “The report states that much of what we know about these dumping sites comes from information supplied to Ireland by the various overseas contracted parties and organisations such as NATO, the Royal Society in the UK, the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment and the Scottish Office of Agriculture, the Environment and Fisheries Department.”“It’s crucial if we are ever to know the true extent of the risk posed by these chemical weapons present off our county’s coastline that the Government here initiates a report into these sites so that the true nature of the problem may be made known.”“As well as my motion earlier this month into this issue, my party colleague Deputy Pearse Doherty has also tabled a Parliamentary Question to the Minister for the Marine in which he has asked what action the Minister plans to take to investigate this matter.”“Working together, we are now calling on the Government to immediately commission an immediate and thorough risk assessment report into chemical munitions’ dumpsites located off the Donegal Coast before the worst should happen and lives are lost.”“This is a very serious situation and one which the Government cannot simply afford to ignore any longer.” ASSESSMENT OF DONEGAL CHEMICAL DUMPSITES NEEDED BEFORE LIVES LOST – CLAIM was last modified: October 19th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:chemical dumpsitesdonegallast_img read more

Live updates: Energized Raiders beat Broncos 27-14

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first_imgGet live updates, news and analysis Monday at 5:15 p.m. when the Raiders play the Broncos in perhaps their last game ever at the Oakland Coliseum.It remains to be seen if this will be the final game here in Oakland, but the Raiders (3-11) would like to go out in style, just in case it us. They’ll be taking on a Denver team that was eliminated from playoff contention when it fell to 6-8 by losing to the Browns a week ago. Oakland had one of its worst performances of the …last_img

Origin of Life: Claiming Something for Almost Nothing

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first_imgGetting life to emerge from nonliving chemicals is either a cinch or the most impossible thing in the universe, depending on whom you ask.  Let’s look at a couple of recent papers that suggest the origin of life was no big deal.    A press release from the University of Colorado advertised a paper by Michael Yarus and team in PNAS.1  The team, funded by a $415,610 grant from the National Institutes of Health, concocted a “Tiny RNA Molecule With Big Implications for the Origin of Life.”  It’s the smallest ribozyme yet, with only five nucleotides, and it is able to “catalyze a key reaction that would be needed to synthesize proteins.”  Tom Blumenthal, a colleague working with Yarus, said, “Nobody expected an RNA molecule this small and simple to be able to do such a complicated thing as that.”  By implication, this ribozyme could have been a stepping stone on the way to larger and more complex molecules of life.    Yarus has been a strong proponent of the “RNA World” hypothesis.  The team’s findings argue that RNA enzymes (ribozymes) did not have to be as complex at first to have a function.  He said, “If there exists that kind of mini-catalyst, a ‘sister’ to the one we describe, the world of the replicators would also jump a long step closer and we could really feel we were closing in on the first things on Earth that could undergo Darwinian evolution.”  He refers to the fact that Darwinian evolution by natural selection cannot be invoked till there is a replicator – a system able to duplicate its parts accurately.  Yarus admitted, “the tiny replicator has not been found, and that its existence will be decided by experiments not yet done, perhaps not yet imagined.”    But does this work support a naturalistic origin of life?  A key question is whether the molecule would form under plausible prebiotic conditions.  Here’s how the paper described their work in the lab to get this molecule:RNA was synthesized by Dharmacon. GUGGC = 5’-GUGGC-30 ; GCCU – 5’P-GCCU-3’ ; 5’OH-GCCU = 5’-GCCU-3’ ; GCCU20dU = 5’-GCC-2’-dU; GCC = 5’-GCC-3’ ; dGdCdCrU = 5’-dGdCdCU-3’ . RNA GCC3’dU was prepared by first synthesizing 5’-O-(4,4’- Dimethoxytrityl)3’-deoxyuridine as follows: 3’-deoxyuridine (MP Biomedicals; 991 mg, 0.434 mmol) was dissolved in 5 mL anhydrous pyridine and pyridine was then removed under vacuum while stirring.  Solid was then redissolved in 2 mL pyridine.  Dimethoxytrityl chloride (170 mg, 0.499 mmol) was dissolved in 12 mL pyridine and slowly added to 3’-deoxyuridine solution.  Solution was stirred at room temperature for 4 h.  All solutions were sequestered from exposure to air throughout.    Reaction was then quenched by addition of 5 mL methanol, and solvent was removed by rotary evaporation.  Remaining solvent evaporated overnight in a vacuum chamber.  Product was then dissolved in 1 mL acetonitrile and purified through a silica column (acetonitrile elution).  Final product fractions (confirmed through TLC, 1.1 hexane:acetonitrile) were pooled and rotary evaporated.  Yield was 71%. Dimethoxytrityl-protected 30dU was then sent to Dharmacon for immobilization of 30-dU on glass and synthesis of 5’-GCC-3’-dU.    PheAMP, PheUMP, and MetAMP were synthesized by the method of Berg (25) with modifications and purification as described in ref. 6.  Yield was as follows: PheAMP 85%, PheUMP 67%, and MetAMP 36%.Even more purification and isolation steps under controlled conditions, using multiple solvents at various temperatures, were needed to prevent cross-reactions.  It is doubtful such complex lab procedures have analogues in nature.  They started with pre-existing ribose, furthermore, and did not state whether it was one-handed.  The putative ribozyme function only consisted of one step of a complex multi-step reaction in living organisms: “The small ribozyme initially trans-phenylalanylates a partially complementary 4-nt RNA selectively at its terminal 2’-ribose hydroxyl using PheAMP, the natural form for activated amino acid.”    The team’s interpretation of the significance of their work relies heavily on imagination: “The ultimate importance of these observations may lie partly in the unknown number of other reactions that can be accelerated by comparably small RNAs.”  They simply assumed that a “geochemical source” would be able to produce a suite of other five-nucleotide ribozymes, including theirs.  “On one hand, with this few ribonucleotides to dispose in space, there may not be other similar nucleotide structures that are both stable and capable of catalysis,” they concluded.  But then they relied on future work and imagination: “On the other hand, for obvious reasons, it will be extraordinarily important to look for other tiny RNA active centers, now knowing they can exist.”  Finally, another reason they worked on the RNA-World hypothesis is that they recognized that “it is implausible that primitive peptides were synthesized using already-formed protein catalysts….”  It must be remembered, too, that these chemical reactions, even if they could occur naturally, have no forward-looking capacity.  They have no desire or power to direct their work toward the goal of producing life.  Because natural selection is out of the question before accurate self-replication, any success will be strictly due to chance.    A prerequisite for RNA is sugar.  How did they arise?  Another recent paper in Science might be called the rock candy theory for the origin of life.2  The authors argue that sugars might form naturally in the formose reaction and be stabilized in silicates.  They called this a “bottom-up synthesis of sugar silicates.”  Recognizing that previous work on the formose reaction produced mixtures that were complex and unstable, they argued that “Silicate selects for sugars with a specific stereochemistry and sequesters them from rapid decomposition.  Given the abundance of silicate minerals, these observations suggest that formose-like reactions may provide a feasible pathway for the abiotic formation of biologically important sugars, such as ribose.”  For a summary of this paper, see Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) press release.  The research was supported by the National Science Foundation, Dow Corning Corp. and Schlumberger Ltd.    The formose reaction “is a possible process whereby sugars form abiotically,” they said.  “This reaction converts formaldehyde (HCHO; C1) to a variety of sugars, in the presence of strong bases, organic bases, or minerals.”  Problem is, it “generates a plethora of unstable sugars, of which the key sugar, ribose, is present in a very small proportion.”  And, “An additional drawback is that the products from the formose mechanism are racemic [mixed-handed], whereas sugars under terrestrial biological conditions are homochiral” (one-handed).  Their work showed that some of these limitations can be overcome with silicates.    A look through the paper, however, shows complex lab procedures that are hard to justify in nature.  They claimed that “This bottom-up synthesis of sugar silicates is a plausible prebiotic process,” but noted that the sugars “oligomerize very slowly” and “uncomplexed higher sugars decompose rapidly under alkaline conditions.”  The RSC article states, though, that high alkaline conditions are required for the scenario, and that most of the silicates formed in weathering processes are consumed by other reactions.  To delay the decomposition, the sugars have to be complexed quickly on silicates or clays.  But they did not say how complexing the sugars with silicates might prevent, rather than accelerate, downstream biogenetic reactions.  So in their best-case scenario, some sugars might form in the formose reaction, and be sequestered in silicate complexes.  Ribose (essential for RNA) would constitute a tiny fraction of product (see 11/05/2004).    At some point, something would have had to take the correct sugars out of the silicate cabinet and use them to assemble RNA while preventing damaging cross-reactions occurring with other compounds.  Even then, the problem of sequencing the nucleotides – the key question – has not been addressed.  Where did the genetic code come from?  One ribozyme is not a code.  Unless and until all the ingredients for a self-replicating system are accounted for, none of these suggestive steps constitute progress toward the origin of life.1.  Turk, Chumachenko and Yarus, “Multiple translational products from a five-nucleotide ribozyme,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences February 22, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0912895107.2.  Lambert, Gurusamy-Thangavelu and Ma, “The Silicate-Mediated Formose Reaction: Bottom-Up Synthesis of Sugar Silicates,” Science, 19 February 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5968, pp. 984-986, DOI: 10.1126/science.1182669.Origin-of-life research suffers from a glaring flaw: lack of critical analysis.  Papers and press releases like this should immediately be subjected to unbiased criticism: “Those are not plausible prebiotic conditions!” or “How would nature sequester the desired compounds from damaging cross-reactions without the techniques you used?”  Many more questions should be asked.  Instead, because secular science has a vested interest in making the origin of life sound simple on the way to Darwinism, the journals allow these views to be aired uncontested.  It presents a false impression that science is making progress toward an answer in little, cumulative steps.  Institutions like the University of Colorado also have a vested interest in making their professors look good in the media.    If Big Science would do its job, the creationists and intelligent design community would not have to be cast in the role of spoil sports, showing why these ideas won’t work.  They won’t work anyway, but other insiders, not just the expelled, should be saying so.  After all, much of the work was paid for with taxpayer dollars.  Where are the watchdogs?THE ROCK CANDY THEORY OF THE ORIGIN OF LIFEIn the Big Rock Candy Mountains, science takes a holiday;Your funding comes around once a week and it’s Darwin Day every day.You never have to clean your lab or put formose away;There’s a little white lie you can wink your eye,Notions jump so high they can touch the skyIn the Big Rock Candy Mountains.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more